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AR 87/2009 OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE

(Consolidated up to 213/2018)

ALBERTA REGULATION 87/2009

Occupational Health and Safety Act

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE

Table of Contents

Core Requirements Applicable
to All Industries

TUPart 1
Definitions and General Application

                                                                                                                                     1 Definitions

             1.1       Farming and ranching operations

             1.2       Domestic workers

                2       Repealed

             2.1       Repealed

             2.2       Designated person to prepare plan

                3       Adoption of standards

             3.1       Previous editions of referenced standards

            4, 5       Repealed

                6       Coming into force

TUPart 2UT
Hazard Assessment, Elimination and ControlUT

                                                                                                                                     7 Hazard assessment

                8       Worker participation

                9       Hazard elimination and control

              10       Emergency control of hazard

              11       Repealed

Part 3
Specifications and Certifications

                                                                                                                                   12 Following specifications

           12.1       Following specifications on a farm or ranch

              13       Manufacturer’s and professional engineer’s specifications

              14       Certification by a professional engineer

              15       Approved equipment

Requirements Applicable to All Industries

Part 4U
Chemical Hazards, Biological Hazards
and Harmful Substances

                                                                                                                                   16 Worker exposure to harmful substances

              17       Exposure to multiple substances

              18       Exposure during shifts longer than 8 hours

              19       Review of exposure limits

              20       Airborne concentration measurements

              21       Potential worker exposure

              22       Worker overexposure

              23       Worker decontamination

              24       Emergency baths, showers, eye wash equipment

              25       Prohibited activities

              26       Codes of practice

              27       Storage of harmful substances

              28       General provisions for asbestos, silica, coal dust and lead

              29       Restricted area

              30       Protective clothing used in restricted areas containing
asbestos or lead

              31       Release of asbestos

              32       Prohibitions related to asbestos

              33       Asbestos in air distribution systems

              34       Asbestos in a building to be demolished

              35       Encapsulation, enclosure or removal of asbestos

              36       Notification of a project

              37      Asbestos worker course

              38       Containment and labelling of asbestos waste

              39       Use of crystalline silica in abrasive blasting

              40       Health assessments for workers exposed to asbestos,
silica or coal dust

              41       Lead exposure control plan

              42       Lead — air monitoring

              43       Medical monitoring for lead

           43.1       Controlling mould exposure

Part 5
Confined Spaces

              44       Code of practice

              45       Hazard assessment

              46       Training

              47       Entry permit system

              48       Safety and protection — generally

              49       Protection — hazardous substances and energy

              50       Unauthorized entry

              51       Traffic hazards

              52       Testing the atmosphere

              53       Ventilation and purging

              54       Inerting

              55       Emergency response

              56      Tending worker

              57       Entry and exit

              58       Retaining records

Part 6
Cranes, Hoists and Lifting Devices

General Requirements

              59       Application

              60       Not commercially manufactured

              61       Identification of components

              62       Rated load capacity

              63       Load charts

              64       Operator requirements

              65       Log books

              66       Preventing an unsafe lift

              67       Preventing collisions

              68       Load weight

           68.1       Lift calculation

              69       Loads over work areas

              70       Tag and hoisting lines

              71       Hand signals

              72       Controls

              73       Repairs and modifications

              74       Containers for hoisting

              75       A‑Frames and gin poles

           75.1       Suspended personnel baskets

Cantilever Hoists

              76       Installation and use

Chimney Hoists

              77       Equipment requirements

              78       Operator responsibilities

              79       Worker in lifting device

Hand‑Operated Hoists

              80       Holding suspended load

Material Hoists

              81       Safety code for material hoists

              82       Rider restriction

              83       Gate interlocks

              84       Operator responsibilities

              85       Signal systems

              86       Hoist brakes

              87       Location protected

Mobile Cranes and Boom Trucks

              88       Safety code for mobile cranes

           88.1       Personnel baskets

              89       Non‑destructive testing

              90       Counterweights and outriggers

              91       Warning device

              92       Preventing damage

           92.1       Load blocks

           92.2       Outriggers

Overhead Cranes

              93       Electrical components and functions

              94       Maintenance and inspection

              95       Safe movement

           95.1       Controls

Personnel Hoists

              96       Safety code for personnel hoists

Roofer’s Hoists

              97       Safe use and design

Tower and Building Shaft Hoists

              98       Protective enclosure

              99       Design

Tower Cranes

            100       Safety code for tower cranes

            101       Limit devices

            102       Operation

            103       Changing components

            104       Test weights

            105       Structural testing and examination

            106       Wind and temperature limitations

            107       Multiple cranes

Underground Shaft Hoists

            108       Safety requirements

            109       Operator responsibilities

            110       Hoist cage

            111       Unguided suspended cage

Vehicle Hoists

            112       Safety standards

            113       Safe use

Winching Operations

            114       Safe practices

Part 7
Emergency Preparedness and Response

            115       Emergency response plan

            116       Contents of plan

            117       Rescue and evacuation workers

            118       Equipment

Part 8
Entrances, Walkways, Stairways and Ladders

Entrances, Walkways, Stairways

            119       Safe entry and exit

            120       Doors

            121       Walkways, runways and ramps

            122       Stairways

            123       Handrails on stairways

Ladders — General

            124       Restriction on use

            125       Prohibition on single rail

            126       Prohibition on painting

            127       Use near energized electrical equipment

            128       Ladders on extending booms

Crawl Board or Roof Ladder

            129       Safe use

Fixed Ladders

            130       Design criteria

            131       Fixed ladders in manholes

            132       Rest platform exemption

Portable Ladders

            133       Prohibition

            134       Constructed portable ladder

            135       Manufactured portable ladder

            136       Securing and positioning

            137       Fall protection

Part 9
Fall Protection

            138       Rescue personnel exemption

            139       General protection

            140       Fall protection plan

            141       Instruction of workers

            142       Full body harness

        142.1       Body belt

        142.2       Lanyard

        142.3      Shock absorber

            143       Connectors, carabiners and snap hooks

            144       Fall arresters

            145       Self‑retracting device

            146       Descent control device

            147       Life safety rope

            148      Adjustable lanyard for work positioning

        148.1      Rope adjustment device for work positioning

            149       Wood pole climbing

            150       Equipment compatibility

        150.1       Inspection and maintenance

        150.2       Removal from service

        150.3       Prusik and similar knots

            151       Clearance, maximum arresting force and swing

Anchors

            152       Anchor strength — permanent

        152.1       Anchor strength — temporary

        152.2       Duty to use anchors

        152.3       Independence of anchors

        152.4       Wire rope sling as anchor

            153       Flexible and rigid horizontal lifeline systems

        153.1       Installation of horizontal lifeline systems

            154       Fixed ladders and climbable structures

            155       Fall protection on vehicles and loads

            156       Boom‑supported work platforms and aerial devices

            157       Water danger

            158       Leading edge fall protection system

            159       Procedures in place of fall protection equipment

            160       Work positioning

            161       Control zones

Part 10
Fire and Explosion Hazards

        161.1       Flammable or explosive atmospheres a hazard

General Protection and Prevention

            162       Prohibitions

        162.1       Classification of work sites

            163       Procedures and precautions

            164       Contaminated clothing and skin

            165       Protective procedures and precautions
in hazardous locations

            166       Internal combustion engines

            167       Flare stacks, flare pits and flares

            168       Industrial furnaces and fired heaters

            169       Hot work

            170       Hot taps

        170.1       Spray operations

            171       Compressed and liquefied gas

        171.1       Welding — general

        171.2       Gas welding or allied process

Welding Services From Vehicles

            172       Storage compartments

            173       Horizontal cylinder storage

            174       Handling cylinders

Isolating Pipes and Pipelines

            175       Isolating methods

            176       Pigging

Part 11
First Aid

            177       Training standards

            178       Providing services, supplies, equipment

            179       Location of first aid

            180       Emergency transportation

            181       First aid providers

            182       Duty to report injury or illness

            183       Record of injury or illness

            184       First aid records access

Part 12
General Safety Precautions

            185       Housekeeping

            186       Lighting

            187       Pallets and storage racks

        187.1       Placement of roofing materials

            188       Restraining hoses and piping

            189       Securing equipment and materials

            190       Skeleton structures

            191       Signallers

            192       Stabilizing masonry walls

            193       Tire servicing

            194       Vehicle traffic control

            195       Working on ice

Part 13
Joint Work Site Health and Safety
Committees and Health and
Safety Representatives

            196       Application of this Part

            197       Terms of reference

            198       Additional duties of a joint work site
health and safety committee

            199       Disclosure of personal information

            200       Duties of employers, contractors and prime contractors

            201       Training standards

            202       Inspection of work site with officer

203 ‑ 207       Repealed

Part 14
Lifting and Handling Loads

            208       Equipment

            209       Adapting heavy or awkward loads

        209.1       Work site design — health care facilities

        209.2       Patient/client/resident handling

            210       Assessing manual handling hazards

            211       Musculoskeletal injuries

        211.1       Training to prevent musculoskeletal injury

Part 15
Managing the Control
of Hazardous Energy

            212       Isolation

            213       Verifying isolation

Securing Isolation

            214       Securing by individual workers

            215       Securing by a group

        215.1       Securing by complex group control

        215.2       Securing remotely controlled systems

        215.3       Returning to operation

Piping and Pigging

        215.4       Isolating piping

        215.5       Pigging and testing of pipelines

Part 16
Noise Exposure

            216       Duty to reduce

            217       Noise control design

            218       Worker exposure to noise

            219       Noise exposure assessment

            220       Results recorded

            221       Noise management program

            222       Hearing protection

            223       Audiometric testing

            224       Credit of time

Part 17
Overhead Power Lines

            225       Safe limit of approach distances

            226       Transported loads, equipment and buildings

            227       Utility worker and tree trimmer exemption

Part 18
Personal Protective Equipment

            228       Duty to use personal protective equipment

Eye Protection

            229       Compliance with standards

            230       Contact lenses

            231       Electric arc welding

Flame Resistant Clothing

            232       Use of flame resistant clothing

Foot Protection

            233       Footwear

Head Protection

            234       Industrial headwear

            235       Bicycles and skates

            236       All‑terrain vehicles, snow vehicles, motorcycles

            237       Fire fighters

            238       Bump hat

            239       Exemption from wearing headwear

Life Jackets and Personal
Flotation Devices

            240       Compliance with standards

            241       Use of jackets and flotation devices

Limb and Body Protection

            242       Limb and body protection

            243       Skin protection

Respiratory Protective Equipment

            244       Respiratory dangers

            245       Code of practice

            246       Approval of equipment

            247       Selection of equipment

            248       Storage and use

            249       Quality of breathing air

            250       Effective facial seal

            251       Equipment for immediate danger

            252       Equipment — no immediate danger

            253      Air purifying equipment

            254       Emergency escape equipment

            255       Abrasive blasting operations

Part 19
Powered Mobile Equipment

            256       Operator responsibilities

            257       Visual inspection

        257.1       Visual inspection on a farm or ranch

            258       Dangerous movement

            259       Pedestrian traffic

            260       Inspection and maintenance

            261       Maintenance on elevated parts

            262       Starting engines

            263       Unattended equipment

            264       Lights

            265       Windows and windshields

            266       Other safety equipment

            267       Warning signal

            268       Bulkheads

            269      Guards and screens

            270       Rollover protective structures

        270.1       Rollover protective structures on farm or ranch

            271       Equipment with rollover protection

            272       Falling objects protective structures

            273       Recertification after modification

            274       Fuel tank in cab

            275       Worker transportation

            276       Riding on loads

        276.1       Transportation on mobile equipment on a farm or ranch

            277       Hazardous loads

            278       Tank trucks

            279       Refuelling

All‑Terrain Vehicles and Snow Vehicles

            280       Three‑wheeled all‑terrain cycles

            281       Operator’s manual

            282      Load and slope limitations

Forklift Trucks

            283       Load chart

            284       Seat belt

Pile Driving Equipment and Practices

            285       Chocking

            286       Pile hoisting

            287       Restraining hoses and connections

            288       Brake bands and clutches

            289       Timber piles

            290       Crane boom inspection

Personal Vehicle for Work Purposes

        290.1       Licensing and mechanical inspection

Concrete Pump Trucks

        290.2       Safety requirements

Part 20
Radiation Exposure

            291       Prevention and protection

Part 21
Rigging

            292       Breaking strength

        292.1       Safety factors

            293       Load ratings

            294       Inspection

            295       Prohibition

            296       Rigging protection

            297       Standards

            298       Slings

            299       Rope wound on drum

            300       Cable clips

            301       Ferrules

            302       Matching components

            303       Safety latches

            304       Makeshift rigging and welding

Rejection Criteria

            305       Synthetic fibre slings

            306       Wire rope

            307       Metal mesh slings

            308       Electric arc damage

            309       Damaged hooks

Part 22
Safeguards

            310       Safeguards

            311       Tampering with safeguards

            312       No safeguards

            313       Building shafts

            314       Covering openings

            315       Guardrails

            316       Hoppers, bins and chutes

            317       Machine failure

            318       Protection from falling objects

            319       Push stick or block

            320       Safety nets

            321       Toe boards

            322       Wire mesh

Part 23
Scaffolds and Temporary Work Platforms

Scaffolds

            323       CSA Standard applies

            324       Design

            325       Load

            326       Tagging requirements

            327       Vertical ladder on scaffold

            328       Working from a ladder

            329       Scaffold planks

            330       Scaffold platform

            331       Metal scaffolding

            332       Bracket scaffolds

            333       Double‑pole scaffolds

            334       Free‑standing or rolling scaffolds

            335       Half‑horse scaffolds

            336       Ladderjack scaffolds

            337       Needle‑beam scaffolds

            338       Outrigger scaffolds

            339       Roofing brackets

            340       Single‑pole scaffolds

            341       Suspended scaffolds

            342       Swingstage scaffolds

            343       Requirements for swingstage scaffold

            344       Safety on swingstage scaffolds

            345       Workers on swingstage scaffolds

Elevating Platforms and
Aerial Devices

            346       Worker safety

            347       Standards

            348       Permanent suspension powered work platforms

            349       Fork‑mounted work platforms

            350       Suspended man baskets

            351       Boatswain’s chairs

            352       Temporary supporting structures

            353       Fly form deck panels

Part 24
Toilets and Washing Facilities

            354       Restrictions by employer

            355       Drinking fluids

            356       Exception

            357       Toilet facilities

            358       Water and drainage

            359       Hand cleaning facilities

            360       Supplies and waste receptacle

            361       Condition of facilities

Part 25
Tools, Equipment and Machinery

            362       Contact by clothing, etc.

            363       Machines close together

            364       Moving workers

        364.1       Moving workers on a farm or ranch

            365       Starting machinery

            366       Preventing machine activation

            367       Operator responsibilities

            368       Controls

            369       Immobilizing machinery

            370      Drive belts

            371      Continuous‑feed machinery

            372       Elevated conveyor belts

            373       Crossing conveyor belts

            374       Actuated fastening tools

            375       Grinders

            376       Chainsaws

            377       Circular saw blades

            378       Band saw blades

            379       Band saw wheels

            380       Power‑fed circular saws

            381       Cut‑off saws

            382       Sawmill head rig

            383       Sawmill log carriage

            384       Robots

            385       Teaching a robot

Part 26
Ventilation Systems

            386       Application

            387       Design

            388       Safety

Part 27
Violence and Harassment

            389       Hazard assessment

            390       Violence prevention plan

        390.1       Violence prevention policy

        390.2       Violence prevention procedures

        390.3       Domestic violence

        390.4       Harassment prevention plan

        390.5       Harassment prevention policy

        390.6       Harassment prevention procedures

        390.7       Review of plans

            391       Training of workers

        391.1       Investigation and reporting of incidents

        391.2       Treatment or referral

            392       Entitlement to pay

        392.1       Retail fuel and convenience store worker safety application

        392.2       Additional requirements for violence prevention plan

        392.3       Additional training required

        392.4       Review of violence prevention plan and worker training

        392.5       Personal emergency transmitter

        392.6       Mandatory fuel prepayment

Part 28
Working Alone

            393     Application

            394     Precautions required

Part 29
Workplace Hazardous Materials
Information System (WHMIS)

        394.1       Definitions

            395       Application

            396      Hazardous waste

            397       Training

            398       Label required

            399       Production or manufacture

            400       Decanted products

            401       Placards

            402       Transfer of hazardous products

            403       Laboratory samples

            404       Safety data sheet — supplier

            405       Safety data sheet — employer

            406       Information current

            407       Availability of safety data sheet

            408       Claim for disclosure exemption

            409       Interim non‑disclosure

            410       Exemption from disclosure

            411       Duty to disclose information

            412       Information — confidential

            413       Information to medical professional

            414       Limits on disclosure

Requirements Applicable to Specific
Industries and Activities

Part 30
Demolition

            415       Worker in charge

            416       Location of equipment

            417       Hazardous substances

            418       Use of explosives

            419       Disconnecting services

            420       Materials chute

            421       Dismantling buildings

            422       Building shaft demolitions

Part 31
Diving Operations

            423       Application

            424       Employer responsibilities

425 436       Repealed

            437       Intakes, pipes and tunnels

438 ‑ 440       Repealed

Part 32
Excavating and Tunnelling

            441       Disturbing the ground

            442       Classification of soil type

            443       Soil stabilization

            444       Marking an excavation

            445       Water hazard

            446       Worker access

            447       Locating buried or concrete‑embedded facilities

            448       Exposing buried facilities

            449       Exemption

            450       Methods of protection

            451       Cutting back walls

            452       Loose materials

            453       Spoil piles

            454       Power pole support

            455       Safe entry and exit

            456       Temporary protective structures

            457       Alternatives to temporary protective structures

            458       Installation of shoring, stringers or bracing

            459       Access for powered mobile equipment

            460       Dumping block

            461       Underground shafts

            462       Drilled or bored underground shaft

            463       Prohibition

            464       Tunnel

Part 33
Explosives

            465       Application

            466       Burning material

            467       Safe work procedures

            468       Blasters

            469       Reporting incidents involving explosives

Handling Explosives

            470       Canadian guidelines

            471       Intermittent storage

            472       Light sources in magazines

            473       Transporting explosives

            474       Oldest used first

            475       Deteriorated or damaged explosive

            476       Unused explosives

            477       Appropriate quantities

            478       Cutting or piercing

            479       Cartridge explosives

            480       Tools

            481       Priming

            482     Length of safety fuse assemblies

            483       Detonators

            484       Storms

Drilling

            485       Drilling location

            486      Bootleg

            487       Size of drill hole

            488       Prohibition

Loading

            489       Unwinding detonator leg wires

            490       Static electricity

            491       Tamping explosives

            492       Sequential firing

            493       Detonation within 30 days

            494       Detonator leg wires

            495       Testing detonators and circuits

            496       Damaged leads and wires

            497       Connecting down lines to trunk cords

Firing

            498       Community protection

            499       Safe distance

            500       Stray electric currents

            501       Overhead power line

            502       Above‑ground charge

            503       Radiofrequency transmitters

            504       Length of fuse assembly

            505       Blasting machine

            506       Shunting the firing line

            507       Loaded hole

Destroying Explosives

            508       Standards

            509       Misfire waiting period

            510       Withdrawing a misfire

            511       Destroying a misfire

            512       Abandoned charge

            513       Removal of waste

            514       Loss or theft

Specific Blasting Activities

            515       Avalanche control

            516       Oil well blasting

            517       Seismic blasting and drilling

Part 34
Forestry

            518       Felling and bucking

            519       Hand felling

            520       Mechanized feller or limber

            521       Operator protective structures

            522       Road warnings

            523       Partially cut trees

            524       Logging trucks

            525       Traffic safety

Part 35
Health Care and Industries with
Biological Hazards

        525.1       Exposure control

        525.2       Medical sharps

            526       Sharps containers

            527       Recapping needles

        527.1       Recapping needles at a farm or ranch

            528       Policies and procedures

            529       Limited exposure

            530       Post‑exposure management

Part 36
Mining

Division 1
General

            531       Application

            532       Building safety

            533       Mine plans

            534       Record retention

            535       Excavation

            536       Open stockpiles

            537       Dust from drills

            538       Light metal alloys

            539       Surface haul roads

            540       Discard from mines

            541       Mine walls

            542       Dumping block

            543       Environmental monitoring of hazardous gases

            544       Reporting dangerous occurrences

Fire Prevention and Emergency Response

            545       Emergency response station

            546       Emergency response team

            547       Fire fighting training

            548      Fire precautions

            549       Fireproofing of roadways

            550       Conveyor clearance

            551       Fire detection systems

            552       Emergency warning system

            553       Evacuation

            554       Fire fighting equipment

            555       Fire extinguishers

            556       Location of equipment

            557       Water supply

            558       Water control valves

            559       Refuge stations

Electrical Systems

            560       Electrical standards

            561       Notice to Director

            562       Electrical installations

            563       Surface facilities

            564       Underground coal mine

            565       Equipment supply systems

            566       Batteries

            567       Overhead power lines

            568       Ground fault protection

            569       Switchgear

            570       Grounding

            571       Electric welding

            572       Hand held electrical drills

Rubber‑Tired, Self‑Propelled Machines

            573       Approval

            574       Standards

            575       Prototype machine

            576       Representative machines

            577       Emergency energy

            578       Hydraulic brakes

            579       Dual brake systems

            580       Emergency brakes

            581       Air brakes

            582       Auxiliary air reservoirs

            583       Front wheel brake control

            584       Parking brakes

            585       Periodic service brake testing

            586       Tests

            587       Maintenance records

            588       Auxiliary steering

            589       Auxiliary pump

            590       Auxiliary steering standards

            591       Design safety factors

            592       Clearance lights

            593       Clear view

            594       Lights

            595       Clearances

            596       Unattended machines

Diesel Power

            597       Diesel powered machine

Conveyors

            598       Fire resistance

            599       Stopping

            600       Travelling room

            601       Combustible dust

            602       Clearances

            603       Riding conveyor belts

            604       Examination

            605       Carbon monoxide monitors

            606       Conveyor roadways

Division 2
Explosives

            607       Theft of explosives

            608       Non‑sparking tools

            609       Underground mine blaster

            610       Surface mine blaster

            611       Magazines

            612       Illumination of magazines

            613       Stored explosives

            614       Electric detonators

            615       Access to explosives

            616       Removal from magazine

            617       Priority of use

            618       Magazine record

            619       Explosive location

Transportation

            620       Removal and transfer

            621       Restriction on open flames

            622       Vehicle requirements

            623       Protection from weather

            624       Original packaging

            625       Detonators

            626       Vehicle breakdown

Operational Procedures

            627       Manufacturer’s specifications

            628       Unsafe explosives

            629       Blast area control

            630       Access to blast area

            631       General duties

            632       Secondary blasting

            633       Mine blaster’s record

            634       Damaged blasting wires

            635       Blasting machine control

Undetonated or Abandoned Explosives

            636       Unused explosives

            637       Misfire procedures

            638       Abandoned explosive

Blasting Machines and Circuits

            639       Testing and initiation

            640       Blasting apparatus

            641       Circuit testing

            642       Circuit requirement

Surface Mines

            643       Application

            644       Signs

            645       Blast holes

            646       Electrical storm

            647       Detonating cord

            648       Ignition precautions

            649       Safety fuses

            650       Electrical cables and wires

            651       Electric blasting

            652       Burning explosives

            653       Misfires

            654       Drilling near explosives

            655       Storage

            656       Blasting warnings

            657       Charged holes

Underground Mines and Tunnels

            658       Application

            659       Permitted explosives

            660       Electric conveyance

            661       Mine shaft conveyance

            662       Transport underground

            663       Drilling distances

            664       Underground mine blaster

            665       Blasting cable

            666       Use of detonators

            667       Same manufacturer

            668       Series connection

            669       Water

            670       Stemming

            671       Firing in the same round

            672       Misfires

            673       Misfire detonation

            674       Leaving a misfire

            675       Compressed air

            676       Shock blasting

            677     Surface shots

            678       Permanent firing station

            679       Secondary blasting

Division 3
Underground Coal Mines

            680       Application

            681       Annual plan

            682       Underground coal mine surveyor

Mine Workers

            683       Supervision

            684       Required qualifications

            685       Mine manager

            686       Combined operations

            687       Working alone

            688       Unsafe conditions

            689       Shift change

            690       Shift report

            691       Record of workers

            692       Self rescuers

            693      Means of ignition

            694       No smoking warnings

Mine Equipment

        694.1       Recognizing international standards

            695       Propane installations

            696       Bulk fuel storage

            697       Voice communication

            698       Location

            699       Permanently attended stations

            700       Portal

            701       Mine outlets

            702       Escape ways

            703       Manholes

Vehicles

            704       Underground fuel stations

            705       Diesel fuel

            706       Control of equipment

Roof and Side Support

            707       Support system

            708       Extractions

            709       Operating procedures

            710       Removal of ground supports

Ventilation System

            711       Ventilation system

            712       Air velocity

            713       Return airway

            714       Doors

            715       Stoppings

            716       Seals

            717       Chutes

            718       Splits

            719       Fans

            720       Reverse flows

            721      Surface fans

            722       Booster fans

            723       Auxiliary fans

            724       Brattice, vent tubes

            725       Operating procedures for booster and auxiliary fans

            726       Stopping fan

            727       Ventilation monitoring

            728       Cross cuts

            729       Operating in split

Gas and Dust Control

            730       Gas inspections

            731       Flammable gas levels

            732       Diesel vehicle roads

            733       Degassing procedures

            734       Gas removal

            735       Unused areas

            736       Sealed off areas

            737       Approval of devices for testing and measuring

            738       Combustible gas detector

            739       Portable detector

            740       Breakdown of detector

            741       Roof bolting

            742       Airborne dust

            743       Incombustible dust

            744       Sampling of settled dust

Explosion Control

            745       Explosion barriers

            746       Welding, cutting and soldering

            747       Pillars

            748       Drill holes

            749       Water or gas

        749.1      Shaft access and hoisting equipment

Part 37
Oil and Gas Wells

            750       Application

            751       Competent supervisor

            752       Breathing equipment

            753       Operating load of derrick or mast

            754       Derricks and masts

            755       Log book

            756       Drillers

            757       Geophysical operations

            758       Drilling rig, service rig, and snubbing unit inspections

            759       Overloaded service rig trucks

            760       Safety check

            761       Exits from enclosures

            762       Emergency escape route

            763       Guy lines

            764       Ground anchors

            765      Trailer pipe rack

            766       Drawworks

            767       Brakes

            768       Weight indicators

            769       Travelling blocks

            770       Tugger or travelling block

            771       Catheads

            772       Racking pipes

            773       Rotary table danger zone

            774       Tong safety

            775       Counterweights

            776       Drilling fluid

            777       Rig tank or pit enclosures

            778       Prohibition on fuel storage

            779       Drill stem testing

            780       Well swabbing

            781       Well servicing

            782       Well stimulation

            783       Well site piping system

            784       Gas sample containers

Part 38 — Expired

Part 39
Tree Care Operations

            792       Application

            793       Safe work practices

            794       Fall protection and work positioning

            795       Harness standards

            796       Knot exemption

Part 40
Utility Workers — Electrical

797 ‑ 798       Application

            799       Protective devices or equipment

            800       Safe work practices for electric utilities and rural electrification associations

            801       Safe work practices for industrial power producers

            802       Coordinated work

            803       Communication lines, cables

            804       Work on energized electrical equipment or
lines (above 750 volts)

Part 41
Work Requiring Rope Access

General Requirements

805 ‑ 807       Exemptions

808 ‑ 810       Rope access safe work plan

            811       Safe work practices

            812       Instruction of workers

            813       Tools and equipment

            814       Equipment compatibility

            815       Inspection and maintenance

816 ‑ 818       Low stretch (static) and high stretch (dynamic) rope

            819       Cow’s tail

            820       Removal from service

821 ‑ 822       Worker rescue

Industrial Rope Access Work

823 ‑ 825     Safe work practices

            826       Worker competency

            827      Worker’s personal logbook

828 ‑ 829       Maximum arrest force, clearance, anchor strength

            830       Safety line

831 ‑ 833       Head protection

            834       Full body harness

835 ‑ 836       Connecting components

            837       Ascenders

            838       Back‑up devices

            839       Descenders

Non‑industrial Rope Access Work

            840       Safe work practices


            841       Worker competency

842 ‑ 843       Fall factor, clearance, anchorage strength

844 ‑ 846       Head protection

            847       Sit harness

            848       Full body harness

            849       Connecting components


Schedules

Core Requirements Applicable
to All Industries

Part 1
Definitions and General Application

Definitions

1   In this Code,

                                          “abate” means to encapsulate, enclose or remove asbestos‑containing material;

                                          “abnormal audiogram” means an audiogram that indicates

                                          (a)    the threshold in either ear is more than 25 dB at 500, 1000 or 2000 Hz,

                                          (b)    the threshold in either ear is more than 60 dB at 3000, 4000 or 6000 Hz, or

                                          (c)    there is one‑sided hearing loss with the difference in hearing threshold level between the better and the poorer ear exceeding the average of 30 dB at 3000, 4000 and 6000 Hz;

                                          “abnormal shift” means a threshold shift, in either ear, of 15 dB at two consecutive test frequencies from 1000 Hz up to and including 6000 Hz when compared to the baseline test;

                                          “acceptance” means an acceptance issued under section 55 of the Act;

                                          “Act” means the Occupational Health and Safety Act;

                                          “actively transmitting” with respect to radiofrequency transmitters includes being set to “on” or “standby” mode;

                                          “actuated fastening tool” means a tool that uses a pneumatic, hydraulic, explosive or electric source of energy to bring about its action;

                                          “acute illness or injury” means a physical injury or sudden occurrence of an illness that results in the need for immediate care;

                                          “advanced care paramedic” or “ACP” means an advanced care paramedic under the Paramedics Profession Regulation (AR 151/2016);

                                          “advanced first aider” means an emergency medical responder, primary care paramedic, nurse or other person who holds a certificate in advanced first aid from an approved training agency;

                                          “aerial device” means a telescoping or articulating unit used for positioning a personnel basket, bucket, platform or other device at an elevated work location;

                                          “all‑terrain vehicle” means a wheeled or tracked motor vehicle designed primarily for travel on unprepared surfaces, such as open country and marshland, but does not include a snow vehicle or farming, ranching or construction machinery;

                                          “anchor” means an engineered component for coupling a fall arrest or travel restraint system to an anchorage;

                                          “anchorage” means a structure, or part of a structure, that is capable of safely withstanding any potential forces applied by a fall protection system;

                                          “ANSI” means the American National Standards Institute;

                                          “API” means the American Petroleum Institute;

                                          “approved by a Director” or “approved by the Director” means an approval issued under section 56 of the Act;

                                          “approved to” means that the product bears the approval or certification mark of a nationally accredited third‑party testing organization, certifying that the product complies with the referenced standard;

                                          “approved training agency” means a person or organization that enters into an agreement with a Director of Medical Services under section 177;

                                          “asbestos waste” means material that is discarded because there is a reasonable chance that asbestos might be released from it and become airborne, including protective clothing that is contaminated with asbestos;

                                          “ASME” means the American Society of Mechanical Engineers;

                                          “ASSE” means the American Society of Safety Engineers;

                                          “ASTM” means the American Society for Testing and Materials;

                                          “audiometer” means a device meeting the specifications of an audiometer described in ANSI Standard S3.6‑2004, Specification for Audiometers;

                                          “audiometric technician” means a person who has passed an audiometric technician course approved by a Director of Medical Services, or has been approved by a Director of Medical Services as having the equivalent of an approved audiometric technician course and who, in either case, has passed a requalification examination when requested to do so by a Director of Medical Services;

                                          “authorized worker” in sections 562 to 569 means a competent worker authorized by the employer to install, change or repair electrical equipment;

                                          “AWG” means, with respect to electrical conductors, American Wire Gauge;

                                          “biohazardous material” means a pathogenic organism, including a bloodborne pathogen, that, because of its known or reasonably believed ability to cause disease in humans, would be classified as Risk Group 2, 3 or 4 as defined in the Human Pathogens and Toxins Act (Canada), or any material contaminated with such an organism;

                                          “blaster” means a worker who holds a valid blaster’s permit issued under the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation;

                                          “blasting area” means the location at which explosives are being prepared, fired or destroyed or in which armed charges are known or believed to exist, and, except at a mine site, extends at least 50 metres in all directions from the location;

                                          “blasting machine” means a portable device used to initiate detonation;

                                          “blasting mat” means a heavy mat made of woven rope, steel wire or chain, or improvised from other material, placed over loaded holes to prevent earth, rock and debris from being thrown in the air by the detonated explosive;

                                          “boatswain’s chair” means a seat that is suspended from ropes, from which one person works on the side of a building;

                                          “body belt” means a body support consisting of a strap with a means for securing it about the waist and attaching it to other components;

                                          “boom” means the part of a structure that is attached to a crane or lifting device superstructure and used to support the upper end of the hoisting tackle;

                                          “boom truck” means a truck that is equipped with a hydraulically driven structure or device that

                                          (a)    is mounted on a turret that is secured to a truck,

                                          (b)    is supported to provide stability, and

                                          (c)    is equipped with a boom that

                                                    (i)    is telescoping or articulating, and

                                                   (ii)    can swing or hoist or raise and lower its load;

                                          “bootleg” means that portion of a drill hole or borehole that

                                          (a)    is not destroyed after an explosive charge is detonated in it, and

                                          (b)    may or may not contain explosives;

                                          “BSI” means the British Standards Institute;

                                          “building shaft” means an enclosed vertical opening in a building or structure extending to two or more floors or levels, including an elevator, a ventilation shaft, a stairwell or a service shaft;

                                          “buried facility” means anything buried or constructed below ground level respecting electricity, communications, water, sewage, oil, gas or other substances including, but not limited to, the pipes, conduits, ducts, cables, wires, valves, manholes, catch basins and attachments to them;

                                          “Canadian Electrical Code” means CSA Standard C22.1‑06, Canadian Electrical Code, Part 1, Safety Standard for Electrical Installations;

                                          “CANMET” means the Canadian Explosives Atmospheres Laboratory, Canadian Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology, Natural Resources Canada;

                                          “cantilever hoist” means a hoist in which the car travels on rails that may be an integral part of a vertical mast and on a vertical plane out‑board from the mast;

                                          “carabiner” means a connecting component that

                                          (a)    generally consists of a trapezoidal or oval body with a self‑locking gate that requires at least two consecutive, deliberate actions to open to permit the body to receive an object and that, when released, automatically closes and locks to prevent unintentional opening, and

                                          (b)    has an ultimate tensile strength of at least 22.2 kilonewtons;

                                          “CEN” means the European Committee for Standardization;

                                          “certified by a professional engineer” means stamped and signed by a professional engineer as described in section 14;

                                          “CGSB” means the Canadian General Standards Board;

                                          “chimney hoist” means a hoist used to lift workers, materials or equipment during the construction of a chimney;

                                          “climbable structure” means an engineered or architectural work where the primary method of accessing the structure is by climbing the structure with the principle means of support being the climber’s hands and feet;

                                          “close work site” means a work site that is not more than 20 minutes travel time from a health care facility, under normal travel conditions using available means of transportation;

                                          “combustible dust” means a dust that can create an explosive atmosphere when it is suspended in air in ignitable concentrations;

                                          “combustible liquid” means a liquid that has a flash point at or above 37.8ºC, as determined by using the methods described in the Alberta Fire Code (1997);

                                          “combined operation” in Part 36 means surface and underground mining activity at the same mine site, whether or not the mine material is being extracted from one or more connected or unconnected seams;

                                          “concrete pump truck” in Part 19 means powered mobile equipment that is comprised of a concrete pump, a distribution boom or mast, delivery pipes and the equipment on which they are mounted;

                                          “confined space” means a restricted space which may become hazardous to a worker entering it because of

                                          (a)    an atmosphere that is or may be injurious by reason of oxygen deficiency or enrichment, flammability, explosivity or toxicity,

                                          (b)    a condition or changing set of circumstances within the space that presents a potential for injury or illness, or

                                          (c)    the potential or inherent characteristics of an activity which can produce adverse or harmful consequences within the space;

                                          “contaminant” means a chemical, biological or radiological material in a concentration that will likely endanger the health and safety of a worker if it is inhaled, ingested or absorbed;

                                          “contaminated” means affected by the presence of a harmful substance on workers or at the work site in a quantity sufficient to pose a risk to health;

                                          “contaminated environment” means a work site that contains or may contain a contaminant;

                                          “control system isolating device” means a device that physically prevents activation of a system used for remotely controlling the operation of equipment;

                                          “control zone” means the area within 2 metres of an unguarded edge of a level, elevated work surface that has a slope of no more than 4 degrees;

                                          “cow’s tail” in Part 41 means a short strap, lanyard or sling connected to the main attachment point of a harness;

                                          “CPSC” means the Consumer Product Safety Commission;

                                          “crane” means equipment that is designed to lift loads, lower loads and move loads horizontally when they are lifted;

                                          “CSA” means the Canadian Standards Association;

                                          “3 decibel exchange rate” means that when the sound energy doubles, the decibel level increases by three;

                                          “dBA” means a measure of sound level in decibels using a reference sound pressure of 20 micropascals when measured on the A‑weighting network of a sound level meter;

                                          “demolition” means the tearing down, destruction, breaking up or razing of the whole or part of a building or structure;

                                          “designated signaller” means a person designated to give signals in accordance with section 191;

                                          “detonating cord” means a cord containing explosives of sufficient strength to detonate other explosives;

                                          “detonator” means a blasting detonator, an electric blasting detonator or a similar device used to detonate explosives;

                                          “detonator leg wire” means an electric wire attached to a detonator;

                                          “direct supervision” means that a competent worker

                                          (a)    is personally and visually supervising the worker who is not competent, and

                                          (b)    is able to communicate readily and clearly with the worker who is not competent;

                                          “Director” in Part 36 means the Director of Inspection whose duties include mines;

                                          “discard” means solid or liquid material that is removed or rejected during mining or processing operations because it has no current use, but that may be of future use;

                                          “distant work site” means a work site that is more than 20 minutes but less than 40 minutes travel time from a health care facility, under normal travel conditions using available means of transportation;

                                          “electric blasting detonator” means a shell containing a charge of detonating compound designed to be fired by an electric current;

                                          “electric utility” has the meaning assigned to it by the Electric Utilities Act;

                                          “electromagnetic radiation” includes radiation used or found in association with

                                          (a)    broadcasting,

                                          (b)    mobile communications systems,

                                          (c)    remote control signal stations,

                                          (d)    television and radio transmitters,

                                          (e)    industrial radiofrequency heaters,

                                          (f)    equipment used for geophysical surveys,

                                          (g)    radar,

                                          (h)    atmospheric electrical storms, and

                                           (i)    cellular telephone systems;

                                          “emergency first aider” means a person who holds a certificate in emergency first aid from an approved training agency;

                                          “emergency medical responder” means an emergency medical responder under the Paramedics Profession Regulation (AR 151/2016);

                                          “emergency response plan” means the emergency response plan required under Part 7;

                                          “excavation” in Part 32 means a dug out area of ground but does not include a tunnel, underground shaft or open pit mine;

                                          “excess noise” means noise that exceeds the limits specified in section 218;

                                          “explosive” means a chemical compound or mixture that by fire, friction, impact, percussion or detonation may cause a sudden release of gases at a pressure capable of producing destructive effects to adjacent objects or of killing or injuring a person;

                                          “explosive atmosphere” means an atmosphere that

                                          (a)    contains a substance in a mixture with air, under atmospheric conditions and at a concentration between the substance’s lower explosive limit and upper explosive limit, and

                                          (b)    is capable of producing destructive effects to adjacent objects or of killing or injuring a person;

                                          “exposed worker” means a worker who may reasonably be expected to work in a restricted area at least 30 work days in a 12‑month period;

                                          “fall arresting device” means a part of a worker’s personal protective equipment that stops the worker’s fall and does not allow the worker to fall farther;

                                          “fall protection system” means

                                          (a)    a personal fall arrest system,

                                          (b)    a travel restraint system,

                                          (c)    fabric or netting panels intended for leading edge protection,

                                          (d)    a safety net,

                                          (e)    a control zone, or

                                          (f)    use of procedures in place of fall protection equipment;

                                          “fall restrict equipment” means a component of a fall restrict system that, when combined with other subcomponents and elements, allows the climber of a wood pole to remain at his or her work position with both hands free, and that performs a limited fall arrest function when the climber loses contact between his or her spurs and the pole;

                                          “fall restrict system” means a combination of a work positioning system and fall restrict equipment;

                                          “fibre” means a particulate material with

                                          (a)    a diameter equal to or less than 3 micrometres,

                                          (b)    a length equal to or greater than 5 micrometres, and

                                          (c)    a length to diameter ratio equal to or greater than 3 to 1;

                                          “first aid” means the immediate and temporary care given to an injured or ill person at a work site using available equipment, supplies, facilities or services, including treatment to sustain life, to prevent a condition from becoming worse or to promote recovery;

                                          “first aider” means an emergency first aider, standard first aider or advanced first aider designated by an employer to provide first aid to workers at a work site;

                                          “fixed ladder” means a ladder that is permanently fixed to a supporting structure in a vertical position or at an angle of not more than 15 degrees from vertical and that does not lean back;

                                          “flammable liquid” means a liquid with

                                          (a)    a flash point below 37.8°C, and

                                          (b)    a vapour pressure of not more than 275.8 kilopascals (absolute), as determined by ASTM Standard D323‑06, Standard Test Method for Vapour Pressure of Petroleum Products (Reid Method);

                                          “flammable substance” means

                                          (a)    a flammable gas or liquid,

                                          (b)    the vapour of a flammable or combustible liquid,

                                          (c)    dust that can create an explosive atmosphere when suspended in air in ignitable concentrations, or

                                          (d)    ignitable fibres;

                                          “flash point” means the minimum temperature at which a liquid in a container gives off vapour in sufficient concentration to form an ignitable mixture with air near the surface of the liquid, as determined by using the methods described in the Alberta Fire Code (1997);

                                          “fly form deck panel” means a temporary supporting structure used as a modular falsework that is intended to be, and capable of being, moved from floor to floor and re‑used during a construction project;

                                          “free fall distance” means the vertical distance between the point from which a worker falls to the point at which deceleration begins because of the action of a personal fall arrest system;

                                          “full body harness” means a body support consisting of connected straps designed to distribute force over at least the thighs, shoulders and pelvis, to which a lanyard or lifeline or connecting component can be attached;

                                          “gob” means an area of a mine from which coal has been extracted and the roof allowed to cave in;

                                          “grinder accessory” means an abrasive wheel, cutting disc, wire wheel, buffing or polishing disc, or other similar product;

                                          “GVW” means the manufacturer’s rated gross vehicle weight;

                                          “hand expose zone” means the strip of land

                                          (a)    1 metre wide on each side of the locate marks for a buried facility other than a high pressure pipeline, or

                                          (b)    5 metres wide on each side of the locate marks for a high pressure pipeline;

                                          “hand tool” means hand‑held equipment that depends on the energy of the worker for its direct effect and does not have a pneumatic, hydraulic, electrical or chemical energy source for its operation;

                                          “handling” with respect to explosives includes preparing, loading, firing, burning or destroying explosives or detonators;

                                          “hazard assessment” means an assessment made in accordance with section 7 or 21;

                                          “hazardous energy” in Part 15 means electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, nuclear, thermal, gravitational or any other form of energy that could cause injury due to the unintended motion, energizing, start‑up or release of such stored or residual energy in machinery, equipment, piping, pipelines or process systems;

                                          “hazardous location” in Part 10 means a place where fire or explosion hazards may exist due to flammable gases or vapours, flammable or combustible liquids, combustible dust or ignitable fibres or flyings, as described in the Canadian Electrical Code;

                                          “health care facility” means a hospital, medical clinic or physician’s office that can dispense emergency medical treatment during the time the workers are at the work site;

                                          “heavy duty scaffold” means a scaffold that

                                          (a)    is designed to support the equivalent of an evenly distributed load of more than 122 kilograms per square metre but not more than 367 kilograms per square metre, and

                                          (b)    has planks with a span of not more than 2.3 metres;

                                          “high hazard work” means work described in Schedule 2, Table 2;

                                          “high pressure pipeline” means a pipeline operating at a pressure of 700 kilopascals or greater;

                                          “hoist” means equipment that is designed to lift and lower loads;

                                          “horizontal lifeline system” means a system composed of a synthetic or wire rope, secured horizontally between 2 or more anchor points, to which a worker attaches a personal fall arrest system or travel restraint system;

                                          “hot tap” means a process of penetrating through the pressure‑containing barrier of a pipeline, line, piping system, tank, vessel, pump casing, compressor casing or similar facility that has not been totally isolated, depressurized, purged and cleaned;

                                          “hot work” means work in which a flame is used or sparks or other sources of ignition may be produced, including

                                          (a)    cutting, welding, burning, air gouging, riveting, drilling, grinding and chipping,

                                          (b)    using electrical equipment not classified for use in a hazardous location, and

                                          (c)    introducing a combustion engine to a work process;

                                          “hours of darkness” means the period from 30 minutes after sunset to 30 minutes before sunrise, or any time when, because of insufficient light or unfavourable atmospheric conditions, persons or vehicles cannot be seen at a distance of 150 metres;

                                          “IEC” means the International Electrotechnical Commission;

                                          “immediately dangerous to life or health” means circumstances in which the atmosphere is deficient in oxygen or the concentration of a harmful substance in the atmosphere

                                          (a)    is an immediate threat to life,

                                          (b)    may affect health irreversibly,

                                          (c)    may have future adverse effects on health, or

                                          (d)    may interfere with a worker’s ability to escape from a dangerous atmosphere;

                                          “incombustible dust” means a pulverized inert mine material of light colour,

                                          (a)    100% of which passes through a 20 mesh sieve,

                                          (b)    not less than 70% by weight of which passes, when dry, through a 200 mesh sieve, and

                                          (c)    that does not contain more than 5% combustible matter or 4% free and combined silica;

                                          “industrial power producer” in Part 40 means an employer authorized in Alberta to generate electrical energy as an independent power producer or solely for its own use in manufacturing or in the handling of material;

                                          “industrial rope access work” in Part 41 means work activities at height which incorporate a working line, safety line and full body harness in combination with other devices that allow a worker to ascend, descend and traverse to and from a work area under his or her own control;

                                          “inerting” means to intentionally flood the atmosphere inside a confined space with an inert gas to eliminate the hazard of igniting flammable vapours;

                                          “ionizing radiation” in section 291 means high‑energy electromagnetic radiation that is capable of disrupting the structure of atoms or molecules;

                                          “ISO” means the International Organization for Standardization;

                                          “isolated” means to have separated, disconnected, de‑energized or depressurized;

                                          “isolated work site” means a work site that is 40 minutes or more travel time from the work site to a health care facility under normal travel conditions using available means of transportation;

                                          “jib” means an extension to a boom that is attached to the boom tip to provide additional boom length;

                                          “Joint First Aid Training Standards Board” means the Joint First Aid Training Standards Board established under the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation;

                                          “Lex” means the level of a worker’s total exposure to noise in dBA, averaged over the entire workday and adjusted to an equivalent 8‑hour exposure measured in accordance with section 219 and based on a 3 decibel exchange rate;

                                          “ladderjack scaffold” means a scaffold erected by attaching a bracket to a ladder to support the scaffold planks;

                                          “lanyard” means a flexible line of webbing or synthetic or wire rope that is used to secure a full body harness or safety belt to a lifeline or anchor point;

                                          “leading edge” means the edge of a floor, roof or formwork for a floor or other walking/working surface which changes location as additional floor, roof, decking or formwork sections are placed, formed or constructed;

                                          “life jacket” means personal protective equipment capable of supporting a person with the head above water in a face‑up position without the direct effort of the person wearing the equipment;

                                          “lifeline” means a synthetic or wire rope, rigged from one or more anchor points, to which a worker’s lanyard or other part of a personal fall arrest system is attached;

                                          “light duty scaffold” means a scaffold that

                                          (a)    is designed to support the equivalent of an evenly distributed load of not more than 122 kilograms per square metre, and

                                          (b)    has planks with a span of not more than 3 metres;

                                          “low hazard work” means work described in Schedule 2, Table 1;

                                          “lower explosive limit” means the lower value of the range of concentrations of a substance, in a mixture with air, at which the substance may ignite;

                                          “lumber” means wood that is spruce‑pine‑fir (S‑P‑F) or better, of Number 2 grade or better and, if referred to by dimensions, meets the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA‑O141‑05, Softwood Lumber, or the requirements of the NLGA Standard, Standard Grading Rules for Canadian Lumber (2003);

                                          “machinery” means a combination of mechanical parts that transmits from one part to another, or otherwise modifies, force, motion or energy that comes from hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical or electrical reactions or from other sources, and includes vehicles;

                                          “magazine” with respect to explosives means a building, storehouse, structure or place in which an explosive is kept or stored, but does not include

                                          (a)    a vehicle in which an explosive is kept for the purpose of moving the explosive from place to place, or,

                                          (b)    a place at which the blending or assembling of the non‑explosive component parts of an explosive is allowed;

                                          “manufacturer’s rated capacity” means the maximum capacity, speed, load, depth of operation or working pressure, as the case may be, recommended by the specifications of the manufacturer of the equipment for the operation of the equipment under the circumstances prevailing at the time it is operated;

                                          “material hoist” means a hoist that is not designed to lift people;

                                          “medical sharp” in Part 35 means a needle device, scalpel, lancet or any other medical device that can reasonably be expected to penetrate the skin or other part of the body;

                                          “medium hazard work” means work that is neither low hazard work nor high hazard work;

                                          “meets the requirements of” means a manufacturer’s self‑declaration that the product complies with the referenced standard is acceptable;

                                          “mine blaster” means a surface mine blaster or an underground mine blaster;

                                          “mine entrance” means a surface entrance to a mine at the point above where excavation began or will begin but does not include a mined out area that has been reclaimed;

                                          “mine level” in Part 36 means a horizontal excavation in the ground or in strata of an underground mine that is usable

                                          (a)    for drainage or ventilation, or

                                          (b)    as an entrance or exit for workers or mine materials to or from a mine or part of a mine;

                                          “mine material” means material that may be taken into or out of a mine including naturally occurring materials, equipment and supplies;

                                          “mine official” means an underground coal mine manager or underground coal mine foreman;

                                          “mine plan” means a map, including a profile or section, of a mine or part of a mine, certified as correct by the mine surveyor;

                                          “mine shaft” in Part 36 means an excavation at an angle of 45 degrees or greater from the horizontal that is usable

                                          (a)    for drainage or ventilation, or

                                          (b)    as an entrance or exit for workers or mine materials to or from a mine or part of a mine;

                                          “mine tunnel” in Part 36 means an excavation at an angle of less than 45 degrees from the horizontal, including inclines and declines, that is usable

                                          (a)    for drainage or ventilation, or

                                          (b)    as an entrance or exit for workers or mine materials to or from a mine or part of a mine;

                                          “mine wall” means the exposed face of an excavation in a surface mine from ground level to the working level;

                                          “misfire” means a drill hole, borehole or device containing an explosive charge that did not explode when detonation was attempted;

                                          “mobile crane” means a crane, other than a boom truck, that

                                          (a)    incorporates a power driven drum and cable or rope to lift, lower or move loads,

                                          (b)    is equipped with a lattice or telescoping boom capable of moving in the vertical plane, and

                                          (c)    is mounted on a base or chassis, either crawler‑ or wheel‑mounted, to provide mobility;

                                          “mobile equipment” means equipment that is

                                          (a)    capable of moving under its own power or of being pulled or carried, and

                                          (b)    not intended to be secured to land or a structure;

                                          “musculoskeletal injury” means an injury to a worker of the muscles, tendons, ligaments, joints, nerves, blood vessels or related soft tissues that are caused or aggravated by work, including overexertion injuries and overuse injuries;

                                          “NFPA” means the National Fire Protection Association;

                                          “NIOSH” means the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health;

                                          “NLGA” means the National Lumber Grades Authority;

                                          “noise” means sound energy at a work site;

                                          “non‑industrial rope access work” in Part 41 means work activities performed within a recreational or sport context that incorporate a working line and a sit harness or full body harness in combination with other devices during

                                          (a)    mountaineering, caving and canyoning activities requiring the use of rope access techniques, or

                                          (b)    climbing on artificial structures designed and built for the purpose of sport climbing;

                                          “nurse” means a registered nurse who is a member of the College and Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta established under the Health Professions Act and who is an advanced first aider;

                                          “occupational exposure limit (OEL)” with respect to a substance, means the occupational exposure limit established in Schedule 1, Table 2 for that substance;

                                          “occupational rope access” in Part 41 includes both industrial and non‑industrial rope access work;

                                          “operate” with respect to machinery or equipment includes using or handling the machinery or equipment;

                                          “OSHA” means the Occupational Safety and Health Administration;

                                          “outlet” in Part 36 means a shaft, slope, incline, decline, adit, tunnel, level or other means of entry to or exit from an underground mine;

                                          “outrigger scaffold” means a supported scaffold that consists of a platform resting on outrigger beams (thrustouts) projecting beyond the wall or face of the building or structure, with inboard ends secured inside the building or structure;

                                          “parenteral contact” means piercing mucous membranes or the skin;

                                          “particulate not otherwise regulated” means insoluble particulate composed of substances that do not have an occupational exposure limit;

                                          “permanent” when referring to a structure, process or action, means that it is intended to last indefinitely;

                                          “permanent suspension powered work platform” means a suspension powered work platform that is a permanent part of a building or structure;

                                          “permitted explosive” means an explosive that is listed as such by the Chief Inspector of Explosives, Natural Resources Canada;

                                          “personal fall arrest system” means personal protective equipment that will stop a worker’s fall before the worker hits a surface below the worker;

                                          “personal flotation device” means personal protective equipment capable of supporting a person with the head above water, without the direct effort of the person wearing the equipment;

                                          “personal protective equipment” means equipment or clothing worn by a person for protection from health or safety hazards associated with conditions at a work site;

                                          “PIP” means Process Industry Practices;

                                          “pipeline” has the meaning assigned to it by the Pipeline Act;

                                          “portable ladder” means any ladder that is not a fixed ladder;

                                          “portable power cables” in Part 36 means portable trailing cables as specified in the applicable sections of CSA Standard CAN/CSA‑M421‑00 (R2007), Use of Electricity in Mines;

                                          “portal” means a structure at the entrance to an underground mine, including any at the surface and any for a distance underground of 30 metres,

                                          (a)    that is used to support the ground and protect workers, or

                                          (b)    where outlets, other than vertical shafts, reach the surface;

                                          “powered mobile equipment” means a self‑propelled machine or combination of machines, including a prime mover or a motor vehicle, designed to manipulate or move material or to provide a powered aerial device for workers;

                                          “primary care paramedic” means a primary care paramedic under the Paramedics Profession Regulation (AR 151/2016);

                                          “prime” with respect to explosives means to attach a safety fuse assembly or detonator;

                                          “processing plant” in section 532 means a facility where coal, minerals or other products of a mine are cleaned, sized or prepared for sale or use;

                                          “professional engineer” means a professional engineer under the Engineering and Geoscience Professions Act;

                                          “pulmonary function technician” means a person who

                                          (a)    has passed, or has been approved by a Director of Medical Services as having done the equivalent of passing, a pulmonary function technician course approved by a Director of Medical Services, and

                                          (b)    if so required by a Director of Medical Services, has passed a re‑qualification examination approved by such a Director;

                                          “purge” means to remove a substance by displacing it with another substance;

                                          “quarry” means an operation involved in the mining of limestone, sandstone or another industrial mineral;

                                          “radiofrequency transmitters” means transmitters that include radio towers, television towers, portable two‑way radio base stations and repeaters, portable two‑way radios and cellular telephones;

                                          “respirable particulate” means airborne particulate collected and analyzed using NIOSH Method 0600 (Particulates Not Otherwise Regulated, Respirable);

                                          “restricted area” means an area of a work site where there is a reasonable chance that the airborne concentration of asbestos, silica, coal dust or lead exceeds or may exceed the occupational exposure limit for one or more of the substances;

                                          “restricted space” means an enclosed or partially enclosed space, not designed or intended for continuous human occupancy, that has a restricted, limited or impeded means of entry or exit because of its construction;

                                          “rural electrification association” in Part 40 means an association under the Rural Utilities Act whose purpose is to supply electricity to its members;

                                          “SAE” means the Society of Automotive Engineers;

                                          “safe patient/client/resident handling” in Part 14 means lifting, transferring or repositioning by the use of engineering controls, lifting and transfer aids or assistive devices, by lift teams or other trained staff rather than by sole use of worker body strength;

                                          “safeguard” means a guard, shield, guardrail, fence, gate, barrier, toe board, protective enclosure, safety net, handrail or other device designed to protect workers operating equipment or machinery, but does not include personal protective equipment;

                                          “safety‑engineered medical sharp” in Part 35 means a medical sharp that is designed to, or has a built‑in safety feature or mechanism that will, eliminate or minimize the risk of accidental parenteral contact while or after the sharp is used;

                                          “safety fuse” means a train of black powder that

                                          (a)    is tightly wrapped and enclosed in a series of textiles and waterproof materials,

                                          (b)    can be connected to a detonator, and

                                          (c)    burns internally at a continuous and uniform rate when ignited;

                                          “safety fuse assembly” means a safety fuse to which a detonator is attached;

                                          “scaffold” means a temporary work platform and its supporting structure used for supporting workers or materials or both, but does not include suspended cages, permanent suspension powered work platforms, boatswain’s chairs, elevating platforms, aerial devices, fork‑mounted work platforms, temporary supporting structures and fly form deck panels;

                                          “secure” in Part 15 means ensuring that an energy‑isolating device cannot be released or activated;

                                          “sharps” means needles, knives, scalpels, blades, scissors and other items that can cut or puncture a person, that may also be contaminated with a biohazardous material;

                                          “shock absorber” means a device intended to reduce the force on a worker when a personal fall arrest system is operating;

                                          “small utility vehicle” in Part 18 means a small vehicle designated for off‑road use, equipped with a bench‑type seat and a steering wheel, and designed to transport more than one person;

                                          “snow vehicle” means a motor vehicle designated or intended to be driven exclusively or chiefly on snow or ice;

                                          “snubbing” in Part 37 means the act of moving tubulars into or out of a well bore when pressure is contained in the well through the use of stripping components or closed blowout preventers (BOPs), and mechanical force is required to move the tubing in order to overcome the hydraulic force exerted on the tubular in the well bore;

                                          “split” in Part 36 means a separate fresh air ventilation circuit in which the intake air comes directly from the main intake airway and the return air goes directly to the main return airway;

                                          “spoil pile” means waste material excavated from an excavation, tunnel or underground shaft;

                                          “standard first aider” means a first aider who holds a certificate in standard first aid from an approved training agency;

                                          “surface mine” means a mine worked by strip mining, open pit mining or other surface method, including auger mining;

                                          “surface mine blaster” means a worker who holds a valid surface mine blaster’s certificate issued under the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation;

                                          “suspended scaffold” means a work platform suspended from above by wires or ropes;

                                          “swing drop distance” means, in a fall‑arresting action, the vertical drop from the onset of the swinging motion to the point of initial contact with a structure;

                                          “temporary” with respect to a structure, process or action, means that it is not intended to last indefinitely;

                                          “temporary protective structure” means a structure or device designed to provide protection to workers, in an excavation, tunnel or underground shaft, from cave‑ins, collapses or sliding or rolling materials and includes shoring, bracing, piles, planking or cages;

                                          “temporary supporting structures” means falsework, forms, fly form deck panels, shoring, braces or cables that are used to support a structure temporarily or to stabilize materials or earthworks until they are self‑supporting or their instability is otherwise overcome, and includes a thrustout materials landing platform;

                                          “total fall distance” means the vertical distance from the point at which a worker falls to the point where the fall stops after all personal fall arrest system components have extended;

                                          “total particulate” means airborne particulate collected and analyzed using NIOSH Method 0500 (Particulates Not Otherwise Regulated, Total);

                                          “tower crane” means a crane that

                                          (a)    is designed to incorporate a power driven drum and cable, a rope and a vertical mast or a tower and jib,

                                          (b)    is of the travelling, fixed or climbing type, and

                                          (c)    is not used to lift people;

                                          “tower hoist” means a hoist

                                          (a)    with a tower that is an integral part of it or supports it,

                                          (b)    that travels between fixed guides, and

                                          (c)    that is not used to lift people;

                                          “travel restraint system” means a type of fall protection system, including guardrails or similar barriers, that prevents a worker from travelling to the edge of a structure or to a work position from which the worker could fall;

                                          “trench” means a long narrow dug out area of ground that is deeper than its width at the bottom;

                                          “tunnel” in Part 36 means an underground passage with an incline of less than 45 degrees from the horizontal;

                                          “UIAA” means the Union Internationale des Associations d’Alpinisme;

                                          “ULC” means the Underwriters’ Laboratories of Canada;

                                          “underground coal mine electrical superintendent” means a worker who holds a valid underground coal mine electrical superintendent’s certificate issued under the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation;

                                          “underground coal mine foreman” means a worker who holds a valid underground coal mine foreman’s certificate issued under the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation;

                                          “underground coal mine manager” means a worker who holds a valid underground coal mine manager’s certificate issued under the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation;

                                          “underground mine” means a mine other than a surface mine;

                                          “underground mine blaster” means a worker who holds a valid underground mine blaster’s certificate issued under the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation;

                                          “underground shaft” means an underground passage with an incline of 45 degrees or more from the horizontal, including a drilled or bored pile or caisson, that is used primarily for the transportation of workers or materials;

                                          “underground shaft hoist” means a hoist used in an underground shaft to gain entry to and exit from a tunnel or underground space, and includes a device for conveying mine material;

                                          “utility employee” in Part 40 means a worker engaged in the work of an electric utility, industrial power producer or rural electrification association;

                                          “vehicle” means a device in, on or by which a person or thing may be transported or drawn, and includes a combination of vehicles;

                                          “ventilation stopping” in Part 36 means a structure that directs air flow or separates intake and return air systems;

                                          “welding or allied process” in Part 10 means any specific type of electric or oxy‑fuel gas welding or cutting process, including those processes referred to in Appendix A of CSA Standard W117.2‑06, Safety in Welding, Cutting and Allied Processes;

                                          “work area” means a place at a work site where a worker is, or may be, during work or during a work break;

                                          “work positioning system” means a system of components attached to a vertical safety line and including a full body harness, descent controllers and positioning lanyards used to support or suspend a worker in tension at a work position;

                                          “working face” means the surface from which mineable material, overburden or waste material is being removed;

                                          “workings” means the area where excavation is occurring in a mine.

AR 87/2009 s1;56/2018

Farming and ranching operations

1.1   In this Code, “farming and ranching operation” includes

                                 (a)    the production of crops, including fruits and vegetables, through the cultivation of land,

                                 (b)    the raising and maintenance of animals or birds, or

                                 (c)    the keeping of bees,

but does not include

                                 (d)    the processing of food or other products from the operations referred to in clauses (a) through (c),

                                 (e)    the operation of a greenhouse, mushroom farm, nursery or sod farm,

                                 (f)    landscaping, or

                                 (g)    the raising or boarding of pets.

2015 c19 s7;152/2018

Domestic workers

1.2(1)  In this section,

                                 (a)    “domestic work” means the normal household work, tasks or chores that are the type routinely performed by members of a household;

                                 (b)    “domestic worker” means a person employed to perform domestic work within a private dwelling by or on behalf of an occupant or owner who lives in the private dwelling.

1.2(2)  Except as expressly provided in this Code, this Code does not apply to domestic workers.

2017 cO‑2.1 s95

2   Repealed AR 56/2018 s4.

2.1   Repealed AR 56/2018 s5.

Designated person to prepare plan

2.2   If a requirement of this Code imposes a duty on an employer with respect to the development or preparation of a plan, the employer must ensure that the plan is developed or prepared by a designated person who is competent in the principles and practices of the work described in the plan.

Adoption of standards

3   The following are adopted for the purposes of this Code:

Alberta Energy

                                          Electric Utilities Act (2003)

Alberta Health and Wellness

                                          Ambulance Services Act (2000)

Alberta Municipal Affairs

                                          Code for Electrical Installations at Oil and Gas Facilities (2006)

                                          Alberta Electrical and Communication Utility Code (2002)

                                          Alberta Fire Code (1997)

ANSI Standards

                                          A10.11‑1989 (R1998), Construction and Demolition Operations – Personnel and Debris Nets

                                          A10.32‑2004, Fall Protection Systems – American National Standard for Construction and Demolition Operations

                                          A14.1‑2007, American National Standard for Ladders — Wood — Safety Requirements

                                          A14.2‑2007, American National Standard for Ladders — Portable Metal — Safety Requirements

                                          A14.5‑2007, American National Standard for Ladders — Portable Reinforced Plastic — Safety Requirements

                                          A92.3‑2006, Manually Propelled Elevating Aerial Platforms

                                          A92.5‑2006, Boom‑Supported Elevating Work Platforms

                                          A92.6‑2006, Self‑Propelled Elevating Work Platforms

                                          A92.8‑1993 (R1998), Vehicle‑Mounted Bridge Inspection and Maintenance Devices

                                          A92.9‑1993, Mast‑Climbing Work Platforms

                                          ALCTV‑2006, American National Standard for Automotive Lifts — Safety Requirements for Construction, Testing and Validation

                                          ALOIM‑2000, Automotive Lifts — Safety Requirements for Operation, Inspection and Maintenance

                                          B1.20.1‑1983 (R2006), Pipe Threads, General Purpose (Inch)

                                          S1.25‑1991 (R2002), Specification for Personal Noise Dosimeters

                                          S1.4‑1983 (R2006), Specification for Sound Level Meters

                                          S1.43‑1997 (R2002), Specifications for Integrating‑Averaging Sound Level Meters

                                          S3.6‑2004, Specification for Audiometers

                                          Z26.1 (1996), Safety Glazing Material for Glazing Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Equipment Operating on Land Highways — Safety Standard

                                          Z87.1‑2003, Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protection Devices

                                          Z87.1‑1989, Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection

                                          Z89.1‑2003, American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection

                                          Z359.1‑2007, Safety requirements for personal fall arrest systems, subsystems and components

API Recommended Practice

                                          RP 4G, Recommended Practice for Maintenance and Use of Drilling and Well Servicing Structures (2004)

ASME Standard

                                          B30.9‑2006, Safety Standard for Cableways, Cranes, Derricks, Hoists, Hooks, Jacks and Slings

                                          B30.20‑2006, Below the Hook Lifting Devices
B56.1‑2000, Safety Standard for Low Lift and High Lift Trucks

Association of Canadian Mountain Guides

                                          Climbing Gym Instructor Technical Manual (2003)

                                          Technical Handbook for Professional Mountain Guides (1999)

ASTM Standards

                                          C478‑07, Standard Specification for Reinforced Concrete Manhole Sections

                                          D323‑06, Standard Test Method for Vapour Pressure of Petroleum Products (Reid Method)

                                          D2865‑06, Standard Practice for Calibration of Standards and Equipment for Electrical Insulating Materials Testing

                                          F1447‑06 Standard Specification for Helmets Used in Recreational Bicycling or Roller Skating

                                          F2413‑05, Specifications for Performance Requirements for Protective Footwear

Australian Rope Access Association

                                          Industrial Rope Access Technique (2000)

British Columbia Cave Rescue

                                          British Columbia Cave Rescue Companion Rescue Workshop (2005)

BSI Standards

                                          BS 6658: 05, Specification for Protective Helmets for Vehicle Users

Canadian Cave Conservancy

                                          Cave Guiding Standards for British Columbia and Alberta (2003)

CEN Standards

                                          EN 341: 1997, Personal protective equipment against falls from height – Descender devices

                                          EN 353‑2: 2002, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height – Part 2: Guided type fall arresters including a flexible anchor line

                                          EN 354: 2002, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height — Lanyards

                                          EN 355: 2002, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height – Energy absorbers

                                          EN 358: 2000, Personal protective equipment for work positioning and prevention of falls from a height — Belts for work positioning and restraint and work positioning lanyards

                                          EN 361: 2007, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height — Full body harnesses

                                          EN 362: 2004, Personal protective equipment against falls from height‑ Connectors

                                          EN 397: 2006,  Specification for industrial safety helmets

                                          EN 567: 1997, Mountaineering equipment — Rope clamps — Safety requirements and test methods

                                          EN 813: 1997, Personal protective equipment for prevention of falls from a height — Sit harnesses

                                          EN 892: 2004, Mountaineering equipment — Dynamic mountaineering ropes — Safety requirements and test methods

                                          EN 1891: 1998, Personal protective equipment for the prevention of falls from a height — Low stretch kernmantel ropes

                                          EN 12275: 1998, Mountaineering equipment — Connectors — Safety requirements and test methods

                                          EN 12277: 1998, Mountaineering equipment – Harnesses – Safety requirements and test methods

                                          EN 12492: 2000, Mountaineering equipment – Helmets for mountaineers – Safety requirements and test methods

                                          EN 1677‑1: 2000, Components for slings – Part 1: Forged steel components grade 8

CGSB Standards

                                          CAN/CGSB 3.16‑99 AMEND, Mining Diesel Fuel

                                          CAN/CGSB 65.7‑M88 AMEND, Lifejackets, Inherently Buoyant Type

                                          CAN/CGSB 65.11‑M88 AMEND, Personal Flotation Devices

CSA Standards

                                          CAN/CSA‑B167‑96 (R2007), Safety Standard for Maintenance and Inspection of Overhead Cranes, Gantry Cranes, Monorails, Hoists and Trolleys

                                          B352.0‑95 (R2006), Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS) for Agricultural, Construction, Earthmoving, Forestry, Industrial and Mining Machines — Part 1: General Requirements

                                          B352.1‑95 (R2006), Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS) for Agricultural, Construction, Earthmoving, Forestry, Industrial and Mining Machines — Part 2: Testing Requirements for ROPS on Agricultural Tractors

                                          B352.2‑95 (R2006), Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS) for Agricultural, Construction, Earthmoving, Forestry, Industrial and Mining Machines — Part 3: Testing Requirements for ROPS on Construction, Earthmoving, Forestry, Industrial and Mining Machines

                                          CAN/CSA‑B354.1‑04, Portable elevating work platforms

                                          CAN/CSA‑B354.2‑01 (R2006), Self‑Propelled Elevating Work Platforms

                                          CAN/CSA‑B354.4‑02, Self‑Propelled Boom‑Supported Elevating Work Platforms

                                          B376‑M1980 (R2008), Portable Containers for Gasoline and Other Petroleum Fuels

                                          C22.1‑06, Canadian Electrical Code, Part 1, Safety Standard for Electrical Installations

                                          C22.2 No. 33‑M1984 (R2004), Construction and Test of Electric Cranes and Hoists

                                          CAN/CSA‑C225‑00 (R2005), Vehicle‑Mounted Aerial Devices

                                          CAN/CSA‑D113.2‑M89 (R2004), Cycling Helmets

                                          CAN/CSA‑M421‑00 (R2007), Use of Electricity in Mines

                                          CAN/CSA‑M422‑M87 (R2007), Fire‑Performance and Antistatic Requirements for Ventilation Materials

                                          CAN/CSA‑M423‑M87 (R2007), Fire‑Resistant Hydraulic Fluids

                                          CAN/CSA‑M424.1‑88 (R2007), Flameproof Non‑Rail‑Bound, Diesel‑Powered Machines for Use in Gassy Underground Coal Mines

                                          CAN/CSA‑M424.2‑M90 (R2007), Non‑Rail‑Bound Diesel‑Powered Machines for Use in Non‑Gassy Underground Mines

                                          CAN/CSA‑M424.3‑M90 (R2007), Braking Performance — Rubber‑Tired, Self‑Propelled Underground Mining Machines

                                          O121‑08, Douglas Fir Plywood

                                          CAN/CSA‑O141‑05, Softwood Lumber

                                          O151‑04, Canadian Softwood Plywood

                                          S269.1‑1975 (R2003), Falsework for Construction Purposes

                                          CAN/CSA‑S269.2‑M87 (R2003), Access Scaffolding for Construction Purposes

                                          W117.2‑06, Safety in welding, cutting and allied processes

                                          CAN3‑Z11‑M81 (R2005), Portable Ladders

                                          CAN/CSA Z94.1‑05, Industrial Protective Headwear

                                          Z94.2‑02, Hearing Protection Devices — Performance, Selection, Care, and Use

                                          Z94.3‑07, Eye and Face Protectors

                                          Z94.3‑02, Eye and Face Protectors

                                          Z94.3‑99, Industrial Eye and Face Protectors

                                          Z94.4‑02, Selection, Use and Care of Respirators

                                          Z107.56‑06, Procedures for the Measurement of Occupational Noise Exposure

                                          CAN/CSA‑Z150‑98 (R2004), Safety Code on Mobile Cranes

                                          Z180.1‑00 (R2005), Compressed Breathing Air and Systems

                                          CAN/CSA‑Z185‑M87 (R2006), Safety Code for Personnel Hoists

                                          Z195‑02, Protective Footwear

                                          Z248‑04, Code for Tower Cranes

                                          CAN/CSA‑Z256‑M87 (R2006), Safety Code for Material Hoists

                                          CAN/CSA Z259.1‑05, Body belts and saddles for work positioning and travel restraint

                                          CAN/CSA‑Z259.2.1‑98 (R2004), Fall Arresters, Vertical Lifelines, and Rails

                                          CAN/CSA‑Z259.2.2‑98 (R2004), Self‑Retracting Devices for Personal Fall‑Arrest Systems

                                          CAN/CSA‑Z259.2.3‑99 (R2004), Descent Control Devices

                                          Z259.3‑M1978 (R2004), Lineman’s Body Belt and Lineman’s Safety Strap

                                          CAN/CSA Z259.10‑06, Full Body Harnesses

                                          Z259.11‑05, Energy absorbers and lanyards

                                          Z259.12‑01 (R2006), Connecting Components for Personal Fall Arrest Systems (PFAS)

                                          Z259.13‑04, Flexible Horizontal Lifeline Systems

                                          Z259.14‑01, Fall Restrict Equipment for Wood Pole Climbing

                                          Z259.16‑04, Design of Active Fall‑Protection Systems

                                          CAN/CSA‑Z271‑98 (R2004), Safety Code for Suspended Elevating Platforms

                                          CAN/CSA‑Z275.1‑05, Hyperbaric Facilities

                                          CAN/CSA‑Z275.2‑04, Occupational Safety Code for Diving Operations

                                          CAN/CSA‑Z275.4‑02, Competency Standard for Diving Operations

                                          CAN/CSA‑Z321‑96 (R2006), Signs and Symbols for the Workplace

                                          Z434‑03 (R2008), Industrial Robots and Robot Systems – General Safety Requirements

CPSC Standard

                                          Title 16 Code of U.S. Federal Regulations Part 1203, Safety Standard for Bicycle Helmets

IEC Standards

                                          61672‑1 (2002), Electroacoustics – Sound Level Meters – Part 1: Specifications 61672‑2 (2003), Electroacoustics – Sound Level Meters – Part 2: Pattern evaluation tests

International Rope Access Trade Association

                                          General requirements for certification of personnel engaged in industrial rope access methods (2005)

                                          International guidelines on the use of rope access methods for industrial purposes (2001)

ISO Standards

                                          3450: 1996, Earth‑moving machinery — Braking systems of rubber‑tyred machines —Systems and performance requirements and test procedures

                                          3471: 2000, Earth‑moving machinery – Roll‑over, protective structures – Laboratory tests and performance requirements

                                          6165: 2006, Earth‑moving machinery — Basic types — Vocabulary

NLGA Standard

                                          Standard Grading Rules for Canadian Lumber (2003)

Natural Resources Canada

                                          Blasting Explosives and Detonators — Storage, Possession, Transportation, Destruction and Sale (M82‑8/1983), Revised 1993

                                          Storage Standards for Industrial Explosives (M81‑7/2001E)

NFPA Standards

                                          30, Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code, 2008 Edition

                                          1123, Code for Fireworks Display, 2006 Edition

                                          1126, Standard for the Use of Pyrotechnics Before a Proximate Audience, 2006 Edition

                                          1971, Protective Ensemble for Structural Fire Fighting, 2007 Edition

                                          1977, Protective Clothing and Equipment for Wildland Fire Fighting, 2005 Edition

                                          1983, Standard on Fire Service Life Safety Rope and System Components, 2006 Edition

OSHA Standard

                                          1928.52, Protective Frames for Wheel‑type Agricultural Tractors – Tests, Procedures and Performance Requirements

PIP Standard

                                          STF05501 (February 2002), Fixed Ladders and Cages, published by the Construction Industry Institute

SAE Standards, Recommended Practices and Reports

                                          J167 (2002), Overhead Protection for Agricultural Tractors – Test Procedures and Performance Requirements

                                          J209 (2003), Instrument Face Design and Location for Construction and Industrial Equipment

                                          J209 JAN87, Instrument Face Design and Location for Construction and Industrial Equipment

                                          J386 (2006), Operator Restraint System for Off‑Road Work Machines,

                                          J1029 (2007), Lighting and Marking of Construction, Earthmoving Machinery

                                          J1042 (2003), Operator Protection for General‑Purpose Industrial Machines

                                          J1084‑APR80 (R2002), Operator Protective Structure Performance Criteria for Certain Forestry Equipment

                                          J1194 (1999), Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS) for Wheeled Agricultural Tractors

                                          J1511 FEB94/ISO 5010, Steering for Off‑Road, Rubber‑Tired Machines

                                          J2042 (2003), Clearance, Sidemarker, and Identification Lamps for Use on Motor Vehicles 2032 mm or More in Overall Width

                                          J2042 July 1996, Clearance, Sidemarker, and Identification Lamps for Use on Motor Vehicles 2032 mm or More in Overall Width

                                          J2292 (2006), Combination Pelvic/Upper Torso (Type 2) Operator Restraint Systems for Off‑Road Work Machines

                                          J/ISO 3449 (2005), Earthmoving Machinery — Falling‑Object Protective Structures — Laboratory Tests and Performance Requirements

Snell Memorial Foundation

                                          B‑90A, 1998 Standard for Protective Headgear for Use with Bicycles

                                          B‑95A, 1998 Standard for Protective Headgear for Use with Bicycles

                                          M2005, 2005 Helmet Standard for Use in Motorcycling

                                          N‑94, 1994 Standard for Protective Headgear For Use in Non‑Motorized Sports

Society of Professional Rope Access Technicians

                                          Certification Requirements for Rope Access Work (2005)

                                          Safe Practices for Rope Access Work (2003)

Transportation Association of Canada

                                          Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Canada (1998)

UIAA Standards

                                          101: 2004, Mountaineering and Climbing Equipment – Dynamic Ropes

                                          105: 2004, Mountaineering and Climbing Equipment – Harnesses

                                          106: 2004, Mountaineering and Climbing Equipment – Helmets

                                          107: 2004, Mountaineering and Climbing Equipment – Low Stretch Ropes

                                          121: 2004, Mountaineering and Climbing Equipment – Connectors

                                          126: 2004, Mountaineering and Climbing Equipment – Rope Clamps

ULC Standards

                                          C30‑1995, Containers, Safety

                                          CAN/ULC‑60832‑99, Installing Poles (Insulating Sticks) and Universal Tool Attachment (Fittings) for Live Working

                                          CAN/ULC‑D60855‑00, Live Working – Insulating Foam‑Filled Tubes and Solid Rods for Live Working

                                          CAN/ULC‑60895‑04, Live Working – Conductive Clothing for Use at Nominal Voltage Up to 800 kV A.C. and +/‑ 600 kV D.C.

                                          CAN/ULC‑60900‑99, Hand Tools for Live Working up to 1000 V a.c. and 1500 V d.c.

                                          CAN/ULC‑60903‑04, Live Working – Gloves of Insulating Materials

                                          CAN/ULC‑D60984‑00, Sleeves of Insulating Material for Live Working

                                          CAN/ULC‑D61112‑01, Blankets of Insulating Material for Electrical Purposes

                                          CAN/ULC‑D61229‑00, Rigid Protective Covers for Live Working on a.c. Installations

                                          CAN/ULC‑61236‑99, Saddles, Pole Clamps (Stick Clamps) and Accessories for Live Working

U.S.A. Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard

                                          FMVSS 218 Motorcycle Helmets 1993 OCT

Previous editions of referenced standards

3.1   If a standard referenced in this Code applies to equipment manufactured or installed on or after a specified effective date, an employer must ensure that equipment manufactured or installed prior to that date was approved to or, as applicable, met the requirements of, the edition of the referenced standard that was in effect at the time the equipment was manufactured or installed.

Transitional

4   Repealed

Repeal

5   Repealed

Coming into force

6   This Code comes into force on July 1, 2009.

Part 2
Hazard Assessment,
Elimination and Control

Hazard assessment

7(1)  An employer must assess a work site and identify existing and potential hazards before work begins at the work site or prior to the construction of a new work site.

7(2)  An employer must prepare a report of the results of a hazard assessment and the methods used to control or eliminate the hazards identified.

7(3)  An employer must ensure that the date on which the hazard assessment is prepared or revised is recorded on it.

7(4)  An employer must ensure that the hazard assessment is repeated

                                 (a)    at reasonably practicable intervals to prevent the development of unsafe and unhealthy working conditions,

                                 (b)    when a new work process is introduced,

                                 (c)    when a work process or operation changes, or

                                 (d)    before the construction of significant additions or alterations to a work site.

7(5)  Repealed AR 56/2018 s6.

AR 87/2009 s7;56/2018

Worker participation

8(1)  An employer must involve affected workers in the hazard assessment and in the control or elimination of the hazards identified.

8(2)  Repealed AR 56/2018 s7.

AR 87/2009 s8;56/2018

Hazard elimination and control

9(1)  If an existing or potential hazard to workers is identified during a hazard assessment, an employer must take measures in accordance with this section to

                                 (a)    eliminate the hazards, or

                                 (b)    if elimination is not reasonably practicable, control the hazard.

9(2)  If reasonably practicable, an employer must eliminate or control a hazard through the use of engineering controls.

9(3)  If a hazard cannot be eliminated or controlled under subsection (2), the employer must use administrative controls that control the hazard to a level as low as reasonably achievable.

9(4)  If the hazard cannot be eliminated or controlled under subsections (2) or (3), the employer must ensure that the appropriate personal protective equipment is used by workers affected by the hazard.

9(5)  If the hazard cannot be eliminated or controlled under subsections (2), (3) or (4), the employer may use a combination of engineering controls, administrative controls or personal protective equipment if there is a greater level of worker safety because a combination is used.

Emergency control of hazard

10(1)  If emergency action is required to control or eliminate a hazard that is dangerous to the safety or health of workers,

                                 (a)    only those workers competent in correcting the condition, and the minimum number necessary to correct the condition, may be exposed to the hazard, and

                                 (b)    every reasonable effort must be made to control the hazard while the condition is being corrected.

10(2)  Sections 7(2) and 7(3) do not apply to an emergency response during the period that emergency action is required.

11   Repealed AR 56/2018 s8.

Part 3
Specifications and Certifications

Following specifications

12   An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    equipment is of sufficient size, strength and design and made of suitable materials to withstand the stresses imposed on it during its operation and to perform the function for which it is intended or was designed,

                                 (b)    the rated capacity or other limitations on the operation of the equipment, or any part of it, or on the supplies as described in the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, are not exceeded,

                                 (c)    modifications to equipment that may affect its structural integrity or stability are performed in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, and

                                 (d)    equipment and supplies are erected, installed, assembled, started, operated, handled, stored, serviced, tested, adjusted, calibrated, maintained, repaired and dismantled in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or the specifications certified by a professional engineer.

Following specifications on a farm or ranch

12.1   In the case of a farming and ranching operation, a person who is competent or a service provider who is competent in relation to the specifications may provide written specifications for the purposes of section 12(b), (c) and (d), and that person is not required to certify those specifications.

AR 152/2018 s3

Manufacturer’s and professional engineer’s specifications

13(1)  If this Code requires anything to be done in accordance with a manufacturer’s specifications, an employer may, instead of complying strictly with the manufacturer’s specifications, comply with modified specifications certified by a professional engineer.

13(2)  If this Code requires anything to be done in accordance with manufacturer’s specifications and they are not available or do not exist, an employer must

                                 (a)    develop and comply with procedures that are certified by a professional engineer as designed to ensure the thing is done in a safe manner, or

                                 (b)    have the equipment certified as safe to operate by a professional engineer at least every 12 calendar months.

13(3)  In the case of a farming and ranching operation, a person who is competent or a service provider who is competent in relation to the specifications may, instead of providing the certification required by subsections (1), (2)(a) and (2)(b),

                                 (a)    provide written modified specifications for the purposes of subsection (1),

                                 (b)    provide written procedures for the purposes of subsection (2)(a), and

                                 (c)    state in writing that equipment is safe to operate for the purposes of subsection (2)(b).

AR 87/2009 s13;152/2018

Certification by a professional engineer

14(1)  If this Code requires that procedures or specifications be certified by a professional engineer, the certification must

                                 (a)    be in writing, and

                                 (b)    be stamped and signed by the professional engineer.

14(2)  Unless the document states otherwise, certification by a professional engineer implies that the procedures or specifications certified are fit and safe for the workers affected by them.

Approved equipment

15   If this Code requires equipment to be approved by a named organization, an employer must use best efforts to ensure that the seal, stamp, logo or similar identifying mark of that organization is on the equipment and legible.

Requirements Applicable to All Industries

Part 4
Chemical Hazards, Biological
Hazards and Harmful Substances

General Requirements

Worker exposure to harmful substances

16(1)  An employer must ensure that a worker’s exposure to any substance listed in Schedule 1, Table 2 is kept as low as reasonably achievable.

16(2)  An employer must ensure that a worker’s exposure to any substance listed in Schedule 1, Table 2 does not exceed its occupational exposure limits listed in Schedule 1, Table 2.

16(2.1)  The amended occupational exposure limit for coal dust as shown in Schedule 1, Table 2 comes into effect on July 1, 2010.

16(3)  If no occupational exposure limit is established for a harmful substance present at a work site, an employer must ensure that a worker’s exposure to that substance is kept as low as reasonably achievable.

16(3.1)  A worker may not be exposed to a substance listed in Schedule 1, Table 2 at a concentration exceeding its ceiling limit at any time.

16(4)  If no 15‑minute occupational exposure limit or ceiling occupational exposure limit is listed for a substance in Schedule 1, Table 2, the employer must

                                 (a)    comply with the eight‑hour occupational exposure limit, and

                                 (b)    ensure that a worker’s exposure to that substance does not exceed

                                           (i)    three times the eight‑hour occupational exposure limit for more than a total of 30 minutes during a continuous 24‑hour period, and five times the eight‑hour occupational exposure limit, or

                                          (ii)    the concentration that is immediately dangerous to life and health,

                                          whichever is lower.

Exposure to multiple substances

17   An employer must take all reasonably practicable steps to ensure that, if a worker is exposed to more than one substance listed in Schedule 1, Table 2 during a single work shift, and the toxicological effects have similar modes of toxic action, the value of D in the formula

 

does not exceed 1, where CB1B, CB2B,…CBnB refer to the airborne concentrations during exposure to contaminants 1, 2,…n, and TB1B, TB2B,…TBnB are their respective occupational exposure limit values expressed in the same units as CBnB.

Exposure during shifts longer than 8 hours

18(1)  Subject to subsection (3), if a worker is exposed to a substance listed in Schedule 1, Table 2 during a single work shift that is longer than eight hours, the employer must ensure that equivalent protection from adverse health effects is achieved by adjusting the eight‑hour exposure limit using the following formulas:

adjusted exposure limit = eight‑hour occupational exposure limit x daily reduction factor

where the daily reduction factor , and

h = hours worked per day.

18(2)  Subsection (1) does not apply to a substance for which the number “3” appears in the “Substance Interaction” column of Schedule 1, Table 2.

18(3)  An employer may adjust the eight‑hour exposure limit by another method that uses recognized scientific principles and that is approved by a Director of Occupational Hygiene.

Review of exposure limits

19(1)  A person may apply to a Director of Occupational Hygiene to request a review of the occupational exposure limit of a substance.

19(2)  An application must be in writing and must include reasons for the review, proposed changes and information that supports the request.

19(3)  On receipt of a request for a review of an occupational exposure limit, a Director of Occupational Hygiene may review the occupational exposure limit.

Airborne concentration measurements

20(1)  If a person measures the airborne concentration of a harmful substance for the purposes of complying with the occupational exposure limits as required by this Code, the person must make the measurement in accordance with any one of

                                 (a)    the NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods, 4PthP Edition (August 1994), published by the United States Department of Health and Human Services, as amended up to and including the 2PndP supplement (January 15, 1998),

                                 (b)    Sampling and Analytical Methods published by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration,

                                 (c)    Methods for the Determination of Hazardous Substances guidance published by the Health and Safety Executive of Great Britain,

                                 (d)    EPA Test Methods published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA),

                                 (e)    Workplace Air Contamination Sampling Guide published by the Institut de recherché Robert‑Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail (IRRSST),

                                 (f)    ISO Standards and Guides of Air Quality published by ISO Technical Committee TC146, or

                                 (g)    Analyses of hazardous substances in air/DFG Deutsche Forschngsgemeinschaft – Commission for the Investigation of Health Hazards of Chemical Compounds in the Work Area.

                                 (h)    repealed AR 56/2018 s9.

20(2)  If there is no analytical method or procedure that complies with subsection (1), an employer may use a continuous reading direct‑reading instrument to measure  airborne concentrations of a harmful substance for the purposes of complying with the occupational exposure limits as required by this Code provided that the instrument is used, calibrated and maintained according to the manufacturer’s specifications.

20(2.1)  An employer must ensure that the person undertaking airborne measurements is competent to do so.

20(3)  If the person is counting fibres, the person must apply NIOSH Method 7400, and only to particles that meet the size criteria for fibres.

20(4)  An employer must record the results of the measurements and keep them for 3 years from the date on which the measurements were taken.

AR 87/2009 s20;56/2018

Potential worker exposure

21(1)  If a worker may be exposed to a harmful substance at a work site, an employer must identify the health hazards associated with the exposure and assess the worker’s exposure.

21(2)  The employer must ensure that a worker who may be exposed to a harmful substance at a work site

                                 (a)    is informed of the health hazards associated with exposure to that substance,

                                 (b)    is informed of measurements made of airborne concentrations of harmful substances at the work site, and

                                 (c)    is trained in procedures developed by the employer to minimize the worker’s exposure to harmful substances, and understands the procedures.

21(3)  A worker who is provided with training under subsection (2) must use the procedures appropriately and apply the training.

Worker overexposure

22(1)  If a worker may be exposed to an airborne concentration that is more than the occupational exposure limit of a substance, the employer must conduct measurements of the concentrations of that substance at the work site.

22(2)  If a worker is exposed to more than the occupational exposure limit of a substance, the employer must immediately

                                 (a)    identify the cause of the overexposure,

                                 (b)    protect the worker from any further exposure,

                                 (c)    control the situation so that no other workers are exposed to the substance at airborne concentrations that are more than the occupational exposure limit, and

                                 (d)    explain to the worker the nature and extent of the overexposure.

22(3)  As soon as reasonably practicable, an employer must inform the joint work site health and safety committee or health and safety representative, if there is one, in writing, that a worker has been exposed to more than the occupational exposure limit of a substance, and of the steps taken to control the overexposure.

AR 87/2009 s22;56/2018

Worker decontamination

23   If a worker may be contaminated by a harmful substance at a work site, the employer must

                                 (a)    provide the facilities, including showers, the worker needs to remove the contamination before the worker leaves the work site, and

                                 (b)    ensure that only those articles and clothing that have been properly decontaminated or cleaned are taken from the work site by the worker.

Emergency baths, showers, eye wash equipment

24   If a worker is present at a work site where chemicals harmful to the eyes or skin are used, the employer must ensure that the worker has immediate access at the work site to emergency baths, showers, eye wash equipment or other equipment appropriate for the potential level of exposure.

Prohibited activities

25(1)  An employer must ensure that workers do not eat, drink or smoke tobacco in a part of a work site contaminated by a harmful substance.

25(2)  A worker must not eat, drink or smoke tobacco in a part of a work site contaminated by a harmful substance.

Codes of practice

26(1)  An employer must have a code of practice governing the storage, handling, use and disposal of a substance listed in Schedule 1, Table 1 that is present at a work site

                                 (a)    as pure substance in an amount exceeding 10 kilograms, or

                                 (b)    in a mixture in which the amount of the substance is more than 10 kilograms and at a concentration of 0.1 percent by weight or more.

26(2)  The code of practice must include measures to be used to prevent the uncontrolled release of the substance and the procedures to be followed if there is an uncontrolled release.

Storage of harmful substances

27   An employer must ensure that a harmful substance used or stored at a work site

                                 (a)    is clearly identified, or its container is clearly identified, and

                                 (b)    is used and stored in such a way that the use or storage is not a hazard to workers.

General provisions for asbestos, silica, coal dust and lead

28   An employer must

                                 (a)    minimize the release of asbestos, silica, coal dust and lead into the air as far as is reasonably practicable,

                                 (b)    keep the work site clear of unnecessary accumulations of asbestos, silica, coal dust and lead and waste materials containing any of these substances, and

                                 (c)    ensure that the methods used to decontaminate the work area, workers, equipment and protective clothing prevent, as much as is reasonably practicable, the generation of airborne asbestos, silica, coal dust or lead.

Restricted area

29(1)  An employer must ensure that only a person authorized by the employer or by law to do so enters a restricted area.

29(2)  An employer must post signs that clearly indicate that

                                 (a)    asbestos, silica, coal dust or lead are present in the area,

                                 (b)    only authorized persons may enter the area, and

                                 (c)    eating, drinking and smoking are prohibited in the area.

29(3)  Signs posted under subsection (2) must

                                 (a)    be in a conspicuous location at the entrances to and on the periphery of each restricted area, as appropriate, and

                                 (b)    remain posted until the area is no longer a restricted area.

29(4)  An employer must

                                 (a)    provide workers in a restricted area with protective clothing that protects other clothing worn by the worker from contamination by asbestos, silica, coal dust or lead,

                                 (b)    ensure that workers’ street clothing is not contaminated by asbestos, silica, coal dust or lead, and

                                 (c)    ensure that a worker does not leave a restricted area until the worker has been decontaminated.

29(5)  Subsection (4) does not apply in an emergency if the health or safety of a worker requires the worker to leave a restricted area without being decontaminated.

Protective clothing used in restricted areas containing asbestos or lead

30(1)  If clothing used in a restricted area containing asbestos or lead is reused and not discarded, the employer must have the clothing laundered in the appropriate manner and at appropriate intervals to ensure

                                 (a)    the clothing is decontaminated, and

                                 (b)    there is no cross‑contamination of other clothing by asbestos or lead.

30(2)  The employer must ensure that clothing contaminated with asbestos or lead that is to be laundered before being reused is stored and transported in sealed containers.

30(3)  Containers used in subsection (2) must be clearly labelled

                                 (a)    to identify the contents,

                                 (b)    to indicate that the contents are a hazard, and

                                 (c)    to warn workers that dust from the contents should not be inhaled.

Release of asbestos

31(1)  If it is determined that asbestos fibres may be released in a building, the building is in an unsafe condition.

31(2)  The employer must take all necessary steps to correct the unsafe condition.

Prohibitions related to asbestos

32(1)  A person must not use materials containing crocidolite asbestos in an existing or a new building.

32(2)  A person must not apply materials containing asbestos by spraying them.

Asbestos in air distribution systems

33   A person must not use asbestos in an air distribution system or equipment in a form in which, or in a location where, asbestos fibres could enter the air supply or return air systems.

Asbestos in a building to be demolished

34   If a building is to be demolished, the employer must ensure that materials with the potential to release asbestos fibres are removed first.

Encapsulation, enclosure or removal of asbestos

35   If a building is being altered or renovated, the employer must ensure that materials in the area of the alterations or renovations that could release asbestos fibres are encapsulated, enclosed or removed.

Notification of a project

36(1)  An employer who is responsible for removing or abating asbestos or for demolishing or renovating a building or equipment containing asbestos must notify a Director of Inspection of the activity at least 72 hours before beginning the activities that may release asbestos fibres.

36(2)  A person must not remove or abate asbestos or demolish or renovate a building or equipment containing asbestos if a Director of Inspection has not been notified in accordance with subsection (1).

Asbestos worker course

37(1)  An employer must ensure that a worker who works with asbestos receives the training necessary for the worker to perform the work safely.

37(2)  An employer must ensure that a worker who enters a restricted area that is designated as a restricted area due to the presence of asbestos

                                 (a)    has successfully completed a course of instruction approved by a Director of Occupational Hygiene, and

                                 (b)    has in the worker’s possession the original valid certificate of completion of the course issued to the worker.

Containment and labelling of asbestos waste

38(1)  An employer must ensure that asbestos waste is stored, transported and disposed of in sealed containers that are impervious to asbestos and asbestos waste.

38(2)  An employer must ensure that a container of an asbestos product and asbestos waste is clearly labelled

                                 (a)    to identify the contents as an asbestos product and carcinogenic, and

                                 (b)    to warn handlers that dust from the contents should not be inhaled.

Use of crystalline silica in abrasive blasting

39(1)  If conducting abrasive blasting, an employer must, where reasonably practicable, ensure that crystalline silica is replaced with a less harmful substance.

39(2)  Repealed

Health assessments for workers exposed to asbestos, silica or coal dust

40(1)  This section applies to an exposed worker who may be exposed to asbestos, silica or coal dust.

40(2)  A health assessment of the worker must include the following:

                                 (a)    the identity of the worker and the employer;

                                 (b)    the date of the medical examination, chest x‑ray and spirogram;

                                 (c)    a 35 centimetres by 43 centimetres postero‑anterior view chest x‑ray, including a radiologist’s report;

                                 (d)    a spirogram, conducted by a pulmonary function technician, including determinations of forced expiratory volume in the first, second and forced vital capacity;

                                 (e)    a history covering

                                           (i)    occupational exposures to asbestos, silica, coal dust or other industrial dusts and carcinogens,

                                          (ii)    significant exposures to asbestos, silica, coal dust, other dust and carcinogens during non work‑related activities,

                                         (iii)    significant symptoms that may indicate silicosis, pneumoconiosis, asbestosis or cancer,

                                         (iv)    past and current medical diagnoses of respiratory disease, and

                                          (v)    the worker’s smoking history,

                                 (f)    a written interpretation and explanation of the results of the assessment by a physician, with particular reference to the worker’s exposure to airborne substances.

40(3)  The physician must give the written interpretation and explanation of the results of the health assessment to the worker not more than 60 days after the tests are completed.

40(4)  The physician must ensure that the records of the health assessment are kept for not less than 30 years.

40(5)  The person with custody of the health assessment record must ensure that no person, other than the worker or health professional who conducts the health assessment, the staff supervised by the health professional or another person authorized by law to have access, has access to the exposed worker’s health assessment unless

                                 (a)    the record is in a form that does not identify the worker, or

                                 (b)    the worker gives written permission for access by another person.

40(6)  An employer must ensure that a worker undergoes a health assessment

                                 (a)    not more than 30 calendar days after the worker becomes an exposed worker, and

                                 (b)    every two years after the first health assessment.

40(7)  If an exposed worker received a health assessment from a previous employer within the immediately preceding two years, the worker must inform the present employer of the date or approximate date of that health assessment at the earliest possible time.

40(8)  An employer must ensure that an exposed worker has received a health assessment within the immediately preceding two years.

40(9)  Despite subsections (7) and (8), exposed workers may refuse to undergo part or all of a health assessment by giving the employer a written statement refusing it.

40(10)  An employer must not coerce, threaten or force a worker into refusing part or all of a health assessment.

40(11)  An employer must pay the cost of the health assessment, medical interpretation and explanation required by this section.

40(12)  An employer must ensure that, if it is reasonably practicable, a health assessment is performed during normal hours of work.

40(13)  An employer must not make a deduction from the worker’s wages, salary or other remuneration or benefits for the time during which an exposed worker

                                 (a)    undergoes a health assessment, or

                                 (b)    travels to or from a health assessment.

Lead exposure control plan

41(1)  An employer must develop an exposure control plan for lead if

                                 (a)    a worker at the work site may be exposed to airborne lead in excess of its occupational exposure limit for more than 30 days in a year, or

                                 (b)    a worker’s exposure to lead at the work site could result in an elevated body burden of lead through any route of entry.

41(2)  The exposure control plan must include at least the following:

                                 (a)    a statement of purpose and of the responsibilities of individuals;

                                 (b)    methods of hazard identification, assessment and control;

                                 (c)    worker education and training;

                                 (d)    safe work practices if these are required by the hazard assessment under this Code;

                                 (e)    descriptions of personal and work site hygiene practices and decontamination practices;

                                 (f)    processes of health monitoring, including biological testing;

                                 (g)    methods of documentation and record keeping;

                                 (h)    procedures for maintenance of the plan, including annual reviews and updating.

41(3)  A worker must follow the exposure control plan and practice the personal and work site hygiene practices established by the employer to minimize lead exposure at the work site.

Lead — air monitoring

42   If a worker may be exposed to lead in harmful amounts at a work site, an employer must ensure that air monitoring and surface testing for lead is regularly conducted to confirm that the controls in place are effective.

Medical monitoring for lead

43(1)  An employer must ensure blood lead level testing is available to a worker if the worker at a work site could reasonably be expected to have an elevated body burden of lead.

43(2)  An employer must ensure that a worker exposed to lead is informed of the availability of the blood lead test.

43(3)  The employer must pay the cost of a blood level test.

43(4)  An exposed worker may refuse to undergo a blood level test by giving the employer a written statement refusing it.

43(5)  An employer must not coerce, threaten or force a worker into refusing part or all of the test.

43(6)  Where the worker has a blood level that indicates lead poisoning, an occupational health and safety officer, under the direction of a Director of Medical Services, may require the employer to remove the worker from further lead exposure.

Controlling mould exposure

43.1   Where mould exists or may exist, an employer must ensure that a worker’s exposure to the mould is controlled in accordance with section 9.

Part 5
Confined Spaces

Code of practice

44(1)  An employer must have a written code of practice governing the practices and procedures to be followed when workers enter and work in a confined space.

44(2)  The code of practice must

                                 (a)    take into account and apply the requirements of this Part and of section 169,

                                 (b)    be maintained and periodically reviewed, and

                                 (c)    identify all existing and potential confined space work locations at a work site.

44(3)  A worker involved in any aspect of a confined space entry must comply with the requirements and procedures in the code of practice.

Hazard assessment

45   If a worker will enter a confined space or a restricted space to work, an employer must appoint a competent person to

                                 (a)    identify and assess the hazards the worker is likely to be exposed to while in the confined space or restricted space,

                                 (b)    specify the type and frequency of inspections and tests necessary to determine the likelihood of worker exposure to any of the identified hazards,

                                 (c)    perform the inspections and tests specified,

                                 (d)    specify the safety and personal protective equipment required to perform the work, and

                                 (e)    identify the personal protective equipment and emergency equipment to be used by a worker who undertakes rescue operations in the event of an accident or other emergency.

Training

46(1)  An employer must ensure that a worker assigned duties related to confined space or restricted space entry is trained by a competent person in

                                 (a)    recognizing hazards associated with working in confined spaces or restricted spaces, and

                                 (b)    performing the worker’s duties in a safe and healthy manner.

46(2)  An employer must keep records of the training given under subsection (1).

46(3)  An employer must ensure that competence in the following is represented in the workers responding to a confined space or restricted space emergency:

                                 (a)    first aid;

                                 (b)    the use of appropriate emergency response equipment;

                                 (c)    procedures appropriate to the confined space or restricted space.

Entry permit system

47(1)  A person must not enter a confined space at a work site without a valid entry permit.

47(2)  An employer must establish an entry permit system for a confined space that

                                 (a)    lists the name of each worker who enters the confined space and the reason for their entry,

                                 (b)    gives the location of the confined space,

                                 (c)    specifies the time during which an entry permit is valid,

                                 (d)    takes into account the work being done in the confined space, and

                                 (e)    takes into account the code of practice requirements for entering, being in and leaving a confined space.

47(3)  An employer must ensure that, before a worker enters a confined space, an entry permit is properly completed, signed by a competent person and a copy kept readily available.

47(4)  Based on a review of similar confined spaces, an employer may issue an entry permit that can be used for a number of similar confined spaces.

Safety and protection — generally

48(1)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    if a lifeline is required in a confined space or a restricted space, it is used in a manner that does not create an additional hazard,

                                 (b)    the safety and personal protective equipment required under this Code is available to workers entering a confined space or a restricted space,

                                 (c)    a worker who enters, occupies or leaves a confined space or restricted space uses the safety and personal protective equipment,

                                 (d)    the personal protective equipment and emergency equipment required under this Code is available to workers undertaking rescue operations in a confined space or restricted space,

                                 (e)    equipment appropriate to the confined space or restricted space, including personal protective equipment, is available to perform a timely rescue, and

                                 (f)    a communication system is established that is readily available to workers in a confined space or a restricted space and is appropriate to the hazards.

48(2)  An employer must ensure that all personal protective equipment and emergency equipment required for use in a confined space or a restricted space is inspected by a competent person to ensure the equipment is in good working order before workers enter the confined space or the restricted space.

48(3)  An employer must ensure that written records of the inspections required by subsection (2) are retained as required by section 58.

Protection — hazardous substances and energy

49(1)  An employer must ensure that workers within a confined space are protected against the release of hazardous substances or energy that could harm them.

49(2)  An employer must ensure that a worker does not enter a confined space unless adequate precautions are in place to protect a worker from drowning, engulfment or entrapment.

49(3)  An employer must ensure that any hazardous energy in a restricted space is controlled in accordance with Part 15.

Unauthorized entry

50   An employer must ensure that persons who are not authorized by the employer to enter a confined space or a restricted space are prevented from entering.

Traffic hazards

51   An employer must ensure that workers in a confined space or a restricted space are protected from hazards created by traffic in the vicinity of the confined space or restricted space.

Testing the atmosphere

52(1)  If the hazard assessment identifies a potential atmospheric hazard and a worker is required or authorized by an employer to enter the confined space, the employer must ensure that a competent worker performs a pre‑entry atmospheric test of the confined space to

                                 (a)    verify that the oxygen content is between 19.5 percent and 23.0 percent by volume, and

                                 (b)    identify the amount of toxic, flammable or explosive substance that may be present.

52(2)  The employer must ensure that the testing required by subsection (1) is performed using calibrated test instruments appropriate for the atmosphere being tested and the instruments are used in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.

52(3)  The employer must ensure that as often as necessary after the first time a worker enters the confined space, a competent worker

                                 (a)    performs the tests specified in subsection (1), and

                                 (b)    identifies and records any additional hazards.

52(3.1)  The employer must ensure that if there is a potential for the atmosphere to change unpredictably after a worker enters the confined space, the atmosphere is continuously monitored in accordance with subsection (2).

52(4)  If tests identify additional hazards, the employer must deal with the identified hazards in accordance with this Code.

52(5)  The employer must ensure that the procedures and practices put in place under subsection (4) are included in the code of practice.

52(6)  The employer must ensure that the results of tests required by this section are recorded.

Ventilation and purging

53(1)  If the atmospheric testing under section 52 identifies that a hazardous atmosphere exists or is likely to exist in a confined space, an employer must ensure that the confined space is ventilated, purged or both before a worker enters the confined space.

53(2)  If ventilating or purging a confined space is impractical or ineffective in eliminating a hazardous atmosphere, the employer must ensure that a worker who enters the confined space uses personal protective equipment appropriate for the conditions within the confined space.

53(3)  If mechanical ventilation is needed to maintain a safe atmosphere in a confined space during the work process, an employer must ensure it is provided and operated as needed.

53(4)  If mechanical ventilation is required to maintain a safe atmosphere in the confined space, the employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    the ventilation system incorporates a method of alerting workers to a failure of the system so that workers have sufficient time to safely leave the confined space, and

                                 (b)    all workers within the confined space have received training in the evacuation procedures to be used in the event of a ventilation system failure.

53(5)  All workers must evacuate a confined space or use an alternative means of protection if a ventilation system fails.

Inerting

54(1)  An employer must ensure that a confined space is inerted if it is not reasonably practicable to eliminate an explosive or flammable atmosphere within the confined space through another means.

54(2)  If a confined space is inerted, an employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    every worker entering the confined space is equipped with supplied‑air respiratory protection equipment that complies with Part 18,

                                 (b)    all ignition sources are controlled, and

                                 (c)    the atmosphere within the confined space stays inerted while workers are inside.

Emergency response

55(1)  An employer must ensure that a worker does not enter or remain in a confined space or a restricted space unless an effective rescue can be carried out.

55(2)  A worker must not enter or stay in a confined space or restricted space unless an effective rescue can be carried out.

55(3)  An employer must ensure that the emergency response plan includes the emergency procedures to be followed if there is an accident or other emergency, including procedures in place to evacuate the confined space or restricted space immediately

                                 (a)    when an alarm is activated,

                                 (b)    if the concentration of oxygen inside the confined space drops below 19.5 percent by volume or exceeds 23.0 percent by volume, or

                                 (c)    if there is a significant change in the amount of hazardous substances inside the confined space.

Tending worker

56(1)  For every confined space or restricted space entry, an employer must designate a competent worker to be in communication with a worker in the confined space or restricted space.

56(2)  An employer must ensure that the designated worker under subsection (1) has a suitable system for summoning assistance.

56(3)  An employer must ensure that a competent worker trained in the evacuation procedures in the emergency response plan is present outside a confined space, at or near the entrance, if

                                 (a)    the oxygen content of the atmosphere inside the confined space is less than 19.5 percent by volume,

                                 (b)    the oxygen content of the atmosphere inside the confined space is greater than 23.0 percent by volume,

                                 (c)    the concentration of a substance listed in Schedule 1, Table 2 inside the confined space is greater than 50 percent of its occupational exposure limit, or

                                 (d)    a hazard other than one listed in clauses (a), (b) or (c) is identified by the hazard assessment and the hazard cannot be eliminated or effectively controlled.

56(4)  An employer must ensure that the tending worker under subsection (3)

                                 (a)    keeps track at all times of the number of workers inside the confined space,

                                 (b)    is in constant communication with the workers inside the confined space, and

                                 (c)    has a suitable system for summoning assistance.

56(5)  A tending worker must not leave the area until all workers have left the confined space or another tending worker is in place.

Entry and exit

57   An employer must ensure that a safe means of entry and exit is available to all workers required to work in a confined space or a restricted space and to all rescue personnel attending to the workers.

Retaining records

58   An employer must ensure that all records respecting entry and work in a confined space, including entry permits and testing under this Part, are retained for not less than

                                 (a)    one year if no incident or unplanned event occurred during the entry, or

                                 (b)    two years if an incident or unplanned event occurred during the entry.

Part 6
Cranes, Hoists and Lifting Devices

General Requirements

Application

59(1)  This Part applies to lifting devices, including cranes and hoists, with a rated load capacity of 2000 kilograms or more.

59(1.1)  This Part does not apply to drawworks on equipment that is subject to Part 37.

59(2)  Sections 60 to 74 apply to roofer’s hoists regardless of their rated load capacity.

59(2.1)  A hoist may only be used for vertical lifting or lowering if it complies with this Part and is designed and manufactured for vertical lifting or lowering.

59(3)  Despite subsection (2), sections 63, 64(4) and 65 do not apply to roofer’s hoists.

59(4)  Despite subsection (1), an employer must ensure that a lifting device with a rated load capacity of less than 2000 kilograms has the rated load capacity of the equipment shown on the equipment.

Not commercially manufactured

60   If a lifting device is not commercially manufactured, an employer must ensure that it is fit and safe for use as a lifting device and that it is certified by a professional engineer.

Identification of components

61   An employer must ensure that all major structural, mechanical and electrical components of a lifting device are permanently and legibly identified as being component parts of a specific make and model of lifting device.

Rated load capacity

62(1)  An employer must ensure that a lifting device has a plate or weatherproof label permanently secured to it that legibly shows

                                 (a)    the manufacturer’s rated load capacity,

                                 (b)    the manufacturer’s name, and

                                 (c)    the model, serial number and year of manufacture or shipment date.

62(1.1)  If it is not practicable for a farming and ranching operation employer to comply with subsection (1)

                                 (a)    the employer must ensure that the manufacturer’s rated load capacity of the lifting device is readily available at the work site, and

                                 (b)    workers must be trained to understand the significance of the rated load capacity in the safe operation of the equipment.

62(2)  If a lifting device is not commercially manufactured, an employer must ensure that it has a plate or weatherproof label permanently secured to it that legibly shows the rated load capacity according to the professional engineer’s certification.

62(3)  Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply to A‑frames and gin poles.

AR 87/2009 s62;152/2018

Load charts

63(1)  An employer must ensure that a mobile crane or boom truck is equipped at all times with load charts showing the rated load capacity of the mobile crane or boom truck at all permitted boom angles and boom radii.

63(2)  An employer must ensure that a tower crane has a load chart

                                 (a)    conspicuously and permanently secured to the cab, and

                                 (b)    showing the manufacturer’s rated capacity loads at various radii of a two‑part line and a four‑part line separately.

Operator requirements

64(1)  An employer must ensure that a lifting device is only operated by a competent worker authorized by the employer to operate the equipment.

64(2)  At the employer’s request, an operator, before operating a lifting device, must be able to demonstrate that the worker is competent in the equipment’s operation and knowledgeable about load charts and the code of signals for hoisting operations.

64(3)  No worker other than the competent worker authorized by the employer may operate a lifting device.

64(4)  Before operating a particular lifting device, the operator must be familiar with all recent entries in its log book.

Log books

65(1)  An employer must set up a paper or electronic log book for each lifting device at a work site.

65(1.1)  Despite subsection (1), the log book requirement does not apply to manually operated hoists.

65(2)  The employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    the log book is readily available for inspection by an officer at any time,

                                 (b)    the most current log book of a mobile crane accompanies it or is available to the operator at all times, and

                                 (c)    if ownership of a lifting device is transferred, the log book is transferred with the equipment.

65(3)  The employer must ensure that the following details are entered into the log book:

                                 (a)    the date and time when any work was performed on the lifting device;

                                 (b)    length of time in lifting service

                                           (i)    recorded as hours of service if the lifting device is equipped by the manufacturer with an hour‑meter, or

                                          (ii)    if required by the manufacturer’s specifications;

                                 (c)    all defects or deficiencies and when they were detected;

                                 (d)    inspections, including examinations, checks and tests, that are performed, including those specified in the manufacturer’s specifications;

                                 (e)    repairs or modifications performed;

                                 (f)    a record of a certification under section 73;

                                 (g)    any matter or incident that may affect the safe operation of the lifting device;

                                 (h)    any other operational information specifically identified by the employer;

                                  (i)    in the case of a tower crane, whether or not the weight testing device was lifted for that working day, before the work of lifting loads began.

65(4)  The employer must ensure that each entry in a paper log book is signed by the person doing the work.

65(5)  The employer must ensure that each entry in an electronic log book identifies the person doing the work.

65(6)  In the case of a tower crane, the employer must ensure that a senior representative of the employer at the work site confirms that the entries in the log book are correct every day that the tower crane is in operation.

AR 87/2009 s65;56/2018

Preventing an unsafe lift

66   If the operator of a lifting device has any doubts as to the safety of workers in the vicinity of the lift, the operator must not move any equipment or load until the operator is assured that the working conditions are safe.

Preventing collisions

67   An employer must ensure that procedures are developed to prevent collisions if two or more lifting devices are in use and there is the potential for a collision between them, their loads or component parts.

Load weight

68   An employer must ensure that the operator of the lifting device, the rigger supervised by the operator and the person in charge of a lift are provided with all the information necessary to enable them to readily and accurately determine the weight of the load to be lifted.

Lift calculation

68.1   An employer must ensure that a lift calculation is completed for any lift exceeding 75 percent of a crane’s rated capacity.

Loads over work areas

69(1)  An employer must ensure that work is arranged, if it is reasonably practicable, so that a load does not pass over workers.

69(2)  An operator of a lifting device must not pass the load on the device over workers unless

                                 (a)    no other practical alternative exists in the circumstances, and

                                 (b)    the workers are effectively warned of the danger.

69(3)  A worker must not stand or pass under a suspended load unless the worker has been effectively warned of the danger and the operator of the lifting device knows the worker is under the suspended load.

69(4)  The operator of a lifting device that is travelling with a load must ensure that the load is positioned as close to the ground or grade as possible.

Tag and hoisting lines

70(1)   If workers are in danger because of the movement of a load being lifted, lowered or moved by a lifting device, an employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a worker uses a tag line of sufficient length to control the load,

                                 (b)    the tag line is used in a way that prevents the load from striking the worker controlling the tag line, and

                                 (c)    a tag line is used when it allows worker separation from the load.

70(2)  An employer must ensure that tag lines of non‑conductive synthetic rope are used when there is a danger of contact with energized electrical equipment.

70(3)  An employer must ensure that tag lines are not used in situations where their use could increase the danger to workers.

Hand signals

71   An employer must ensure that hand signals necessary to ensure a safe hoisting operation are given in accordance with section 191 by a competent signaller designated by the employer.

Controls

72(1)  Moved to section 95.1

72(2)  Repealed

72(3)  The employer must ensure that an operator who uses a remote control to operate a lifting device is visually distinguishable from other workers at the work site.

Repairs and modifications

73(1)  An employer must ensure that structural repairs or modifications to components of a lifting device are

                                 (a)    made only under the direction and control of a professional engineer, and

                                 (b)    certified by the professional engineer to confirm that the workmanship and quality of materials used has restored the components to not less than their original capacity.

73(2)  If structural repairs or modifications are made, the employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    the repaired or modified components are individually and uniquely identified in the log book and on the component, and

                                 (b)    the professional engineer’s certification makes reference to those components and their identification.

Containers for hoisting

74(1)  An employer must ensure that a container used for a load being lifted by a hoist is designed for that particular purpose and bears a marking to indicate its maximum load rating.

74(2)  A person must not use an oil drum or similar container as a container for a load being lifted by a hoist unless the drum or container is hoisted in a cage designed for that purpose.

A‑Frames and gin poles

75   An employer must ensure that an A‑frame or gin pole

                                 (a)    is not inclined more than 45 degrees from the vertical,

                                 (b)    is equipped with a boom stop, and

                                 (c)    has the sheave and cap of its rigging attached securely enough to the gin pole to withstand any loads to which the assembly may be subjected.

Suspended personnel baskets

75.1(1)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a commercially manufactured suspended personnel basket is erected, used, operated and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, or

                                 (b)    a suspended personnel basket that is not commercially manufactured is designed and certified by a professional engineer.

75.1(2)  Despite section 147, if it is not practicable to provide a separate personal fall arrest system using a vertical lifeline for each worker in the man basket, an employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a separate support is attached between the suspended personnel basket and the hoist line above the hook assembly that is capable of withstanding the weight of the personel basket, materials, equipment and workers should the hook assembly fail, and

                                 (b)    each worker within the personnel basket is wearing a separate personal fall arrest system attached to the personnel basket.

Cantilever Hoists

Installation and use

76   An employer must ensure that a cantilever hoist

                                 (a)    is anchored to a building or structure at distance intervals that meet the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer,

                                 (b)    has a foundation that is solid, level and of a size and strength capable of supporting the weight of the hoist and its loads under all working conditions, and

                                 (c)    carries loads that do not project beyond the edges of the material landing platform or the skip of the hoist.

Chimney Hoists

Equipment requirements

77   An employer must ensure that a chimney hoist

                                 (a)    is equipped with positive drives,

                                 (b)    does not have a clutch between the transmission and the hoist drums,

                                 (c)    is equipped with a speed‑indicating device if the hoist is capable of operating at speeds of more than 0.6 metres per second,

                                 (d)    is equipped with at least two independent braking systems, each capable of stopping 150 percent of the manufacturer’s rated capacity load, at the manufacture’s rated capacity maximum speed,

                                 (e)    has a roller or ball bearing swivel installed between the bucket and the rope on the hoist,

                                 (f)    is equipped with a communication system that informs the operator when the hoist is to be used to lift or lower workers, and

                                 (g)    has a separate safety line attached between the bucket or man basket yoke and the hoist rope above the ball or hook.

Operator responsibilities

78(1)  An operator of a chimney hoist must not

                                 (a)    lift or lower a worker at a speed of more than 0.6 metres per second,

                                 (b)    use the brake alone to control the speed of the chimney hoist when a worker is being lowered,

                                 (c)    lift or lower more than two workers at the same time, or

                                 (d)    lift or lower materials or equipment at the same time as a worker.

78(2)  An operator of a chimney hoist must use safety latch hooks or shackles equipped with safety pins.

Worker in lifting device

79   An employer must ensure that a worker who is lifted or lowered by a chimney hoist uses a personnel basket.

Hand‑Operated Hoists

Holding suspended load

80   An employer must ensure that a hand‑operated hoist is provided with a device capable of holding the total load suspended safely under all operating conditions.

Material Hoists

Safety code for material hoists

81   A material hoist must meet the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA‑Z256‑M87 (R2006), Safety Code for Material Hoists.

Rider restriction

82(1)  A person must not ride on a material hoist.

82(2)  An employer must ensure that a worker does not ride on a material hoist.

Gate interlocks

83   An employer must ensure that a material hoist is equipped at each floor or level with devices that prevent

                                 (a)    a landing gate from being opened unless the hoist platform is positioned at that landing, or

                                 (b)    movement of the hoist platform when a landing gate is open.

Operator responsibilities

84   A material hoist operator must not

                                 (a)    leave the hoist controls unattended while the skip, platform or load is in the lifted position, or

                                 (b)    move the skip, platform or cage until the operator is informed by a designated signaller that it is safe to do so.

Signal systems

85(1)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    if a signal system is  used to control the movement of a material hoist the signal descriptions are posted at each floor or level and at the operator’s station,

                                 (b)    the operator of a material hoist, and a designated signaller at the floor or level where loading and unloading is being performed, maintain visual or auditory communication with each other at all times during loading and unloading, and

                                 (c)    if an electrical or mechanical signal system has been installed to coordinate the movement of the hoist’s skip, platform or cage, the system is arranged so that the hoist operator knows from which floor or level a signal originates.

85(2)  An employer must ensure that a material hoist erected at a building that is more than 20 metres high has a signal system that

                                 (a)    is installed at each floor or level and at the operator’s station,

                                 (b)    is designed to allow voice communication between a worker at any floor or level and the operator, and

                                 (b)    informs the operator from which floor or level the signal originates.

Hoist brakes

86   An employer must ensure that a material hoist’s braking system is capable of stopping and holding the total load suspended safely, under all operating conditions.

Location protected

87   An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    the area around the base of the material hoist is fenced or otherwise barricaded to prevent anyone from entering it if the hoist platform is not at the base level,

                                 (b)    a removable guardrail or gate is installed between 600 millimeters and 900 millimetres away from the edge of a floor or level served by the material hoist, and

                                 (c)    if the operator controls are not remote from the material hoist, overhead protection is provided for the operator.

Mobile Cranes and Boom Trucks

Safety code for mobile cranes

88   A mobile crane must meet the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA‑Z150‑98 (R2004), Safety Code on Mobile Cranes with the exception of clauses 1.6 and 1.7.

Personnel baskets

88.1   Despite section 88, an employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a personnel basket used with a mobile crane is designed, constructed, maintained and used in accordance with CSA Standard CAN/CSA Z150‑98 (R2004), Safety Code on Mobile Cranes, clause 5.4.7, or

                                 (b)    a personnel basket that is not commercially manufactured is designed and certified by a professional engineer.

Non‑destructive testing

89   An employer must ensure that all load‑bearing components of a mobile crane undergo non‑destructive testing under the direction and control of a professional engineer in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications at 12‑month intervals from the date of the mobile crane’s most recent certification.

Counterweights and outriggers

90   If outriggers are installed on a mobile crane or boom truck, the employer must ensure the outriggers are extended and supported by solid footings before being used.

Warning device

91   An employer must ensure that a mobile crane is equipped with an effective warning device in addition to the one required by section 267, that

                                 (a)    is readily accessible to the operator,

                                 (b)    is sufficient to warn workers of the impending movement of the crane, and

                                 (c)    if it is an auditory warning device, has a distinct sound that is distinguishable from all other sounds at the work site.

Preventing damage

92(1)  If a boom is fitted on a mobile crane or boom truck and the crane or truck may overturn or flip backwards because of the return movement of the boom, an employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    positive boom stops are installed in the crane or truck in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, and

                                 (b)    a boom stop limit device is installed to prevent the boom from being drawn back beyond a pre‑determined safe boom angle.

92(2)  If a jib is attached to the boom of a mobile crane or boom truck, an employer must ensure that a jib stop device is installed in the crane or truck to prevent the jib from being drawn back over the boom.

92(3)  An employer must ensure that blocking procedures are developed to prevent the collapse or upset of any part of a derrick, mast or boom during the installation, removal or replacement of a derrick or the mast or boom section of a mobile crane or boom truck.

Load blocks

92.1   Despite section 88, an employer must ensure that the load blocks of a mobile crane are maintained and repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or, if there are no manufacturer’s specifications, in accordance with  CSA Standard CAN/CSA Z150‑98 (R2004), Safety Code on Mobile Cranes, clause 4.3.5.2.

Outriggers

92.2   Despite section 88, an employer must ensure that a mobile crane equipped with outriggers is set up with the outriggers on load‑bearing floats or pads that are of adequate size, strength and rigidity.

Overhead Cranes

Electrical components and functions

93   A bridge, jib, monorail, gantry or overhead travelling crane must meet the design requirements for electrical components and functions of

                                 (a)    CSA Standard C22.1‑06, Canadian Electrical Code, Part 1, Section 40, and

                                 (b)    CSA Standard C22.2 No. 33‑M1984 (R2004), Construction and Test of Electric Cranes and Hoists.

Maintenance and inspection

94   A bridge, jib, monorail, gantry or overhead travelling crane must meet the safety requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA‑B167‑96 (R2007), Safety Standard for Maintenance and Inspection of Overhead Cranes, Gantry Cranes, Monorails, Hoists and Trolleys.

Safe movement

95   An employer must ensure that a crane operating on rails, tracks or trolleys

                                 (a)    has a positive stop or limiting device on the crane or on the rails, tracks or trolleys to prevent it from overrunning safe limits or contacting other equipment that is on the same rail, track or trolley,

                                 (b)    is equipped with an overspeed limiting device,

                                 (c)    has positive means of ensuring that the rails, tracks or trolleys cannot be spread or misalign,

                                 (d)    has sweep guards installed to prevent material on the rail, track or trolley from dislodging the crane, and

                                 (e)    has a bed designed to carry all anticipated loads.

Controls

95.1   An employer must ensure that the controls of an overhead crane are of a constant manual pressure type.

Personnel Hoists

Safety code for personnel hoists

96   Except for a personnel hoist used in a mine, a personnel hoist must meet the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA‑Z185 (R2006), Safety Code for Personnel Hoists.

Roofer’s Hoists

Safe use and design

97(1)  An employer must ensure that a roofer’s hoist has counterweights

                                 (a)    designed as a component part of the hoist to remain securely attached to the hoist until all lifting is completed, and

                                 (b)    heavy enough to counterbalance four times the maximum weight of the load being lifted.

97(2)  A person must not use roofing materials as a counterweight.

97(3)  An employer must ensure that a roofer’s hoist is inspected daily by a competent worker designated by the employer.

97(4)  An employer must ensure that bolts and pins used to interconnect component parts of a roofer’s hoist are equipped with safety pins that prevent them from being dislodged.

97(5)  A worker must

                                 (a)    use a roofer’s hoist only for vertical lifting, and

                                 (b)    not exceed the design load limits of the roofer’s hoist.

97(6)  An employer must ensure that a gallows frame roofer’s hoist is constructed of lumber sized as follows, or of material that has the same or greater properties as the lumber used for the same function:

                                 (a)    thrustout — 38 millimetres by 184 millimeters lumber;

                                 (b)    uprights — 90 millimetres by 90 millimetres lumber;

                                 (c)    braces and base plates — 38 millimetres by 140 millimetres.

97(7)  An employer must ensure that a gallows frame roofer’s hoist

                                 (a)    has a hoisting line with a breaking strength of not less than 25 kilonewtons,

                                 (b)    has thrustouts placed on their edge that do not overhang more than one‑quarter of their length, and

                                 (c)    has sheaves securely attached to the thrustouts without using single strand wire or nails.

Tower and Building Shaft Hoists

Protective enclosure

98   An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a tower hoist is enclosed at ground level with solid walls or equally effective fencing to a height of at least 2 metres on all sides except the loading side,

                                 (b)    a hoist shaft inside a building is enclosed on all sides but the landing side at all floors or levels to a height of at least 2 metres with solid walls or equally effective fencing,

                                 (c)    a landing gate inside a building does not open unless the hoist platform is positioned at that landing,

                                 (d)    the landing side of the hoist shaft inside a building has an access door complete with a lock and an “OPEN SHAFT” sign attached to the enclosure,

                                 (e)    a tower or building shaft hoist is braced, guyed or supported at vertical intervals of not more than 6 metres or at the intervals in the manufacturer’s specifications and

                                 (f)    the bottom pulley block or sheave is securely anchored and the pulley and hoisting ropes to the hoisting engine are enclosed.

Design

99   An employer must ensure that a boom is not installed on a tower hoist unless its design is certified by a professional engineer to the effect that the tower structure can withstand the additional load.

Tower Cranes

Safety code for tower cranes

100   A tower crane manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 must meet the requirements of CSA Standard Z248‑04, Code for Tower Cranes.

Limit devices

101(1)   An employer must ensure that a tower crane is equipped with

                                 (a)    an overload device consisting of a hoist overload switch that automatically restricts the weight of the load,

                                 (b)    a travel limit device consisting of a moment overload switch that automatically restricts the radius within which the load can travel,

                                 (c)    a height limit switch that prevents the load from being overwound, and

                                 (d)    trolley travel limit devices consisting of a “trolley in” limit switch and a “trolley out” limit switch that prevent the trolley from running to the end of its track and falling off.

101(2)  An employer must ensure that the devices described in subsection (1) are adjusted and set in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications and have their limit switches sealed.

Operation

102   An operator of a tower crane must

                                 (a)    ensure the safe movement of the crane and its load at all times,

                                 (b)    verify at the beginning of each work shift that the mast is plumb, and

                                 (c)    verify at least once in each 24 hour period that the limit devices described in section 101 are operational.

Changing components

103(1)  An employer must ensure that the major structural, mechanical and electrical components of a tower crane are not interchanged with those of other tower cranes unless

                                 (a)    the components are from the same make or model of tower crane,

                                 (b)    the components are approved by the manufacturer as suitable for their intended application, or

                                 (c)    the components are certified by a professional engineer as suitable for their intended application.

103(2)  An employer must ensure that if an operator’s cab is attached to the boom of a tower crane, the design of the cab, its position, method of attachment and any structural changes, including changes to the counterweight, capacity and operation of the crane, are in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or are certified by a professional engineer.

Test weights

104(1)  An employer must ensure that if weights are used as a weight testing device on a tower crane,

                                 (a)    the true weight of the test weight is determined and legibly recorded on the weight, and

                                 (b)    when not in use, the test weights rest on supports to prevent the weights from freezing to the ground or creating a vacuum when lifted.

104(2)   The employer must ensure that the lifting attachment on a test weight is made of mild steel and of sufficient size and strength to support the weight.

Structural testing and examination

105(1)  An employer must ensure that all structural and rigging components of a tower crane undergo non‑destructive testing under the direction and control of a professional engineer in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications

                                 (a)    as close as reasonably practicable to the project site,

                                 (b)    before the crane is used for the first time in a project in Alberta, and

                                 (c)    if the crane is moved from project to project, before it is used after the move.

105(2)  If a tower crane is in operation on a project for more than one year from the date on which the crane starts operating, the employer must ensure its structural components are examined under the direction and control of a professional engineer after each period of 2000 operating hours or 12 months after the date on which it starts operating, whichever occurs first.

105(3)  The employer must ensure that the results of the testing or examination required by subsections (1) and (2) are certified by a professional engineer in a report that clearly identifies the crane and the components to which the information relates.

Wind and temperature limitations

106(1)  An employer must ensure that operation of a tower crane is stopped when the wind velocity at the elevation of the crane exceeds the limit recommended in the manufacturer’s specifications or, if there are none, in specifications certified by a professional engineer.

106(2)  An employer must ensure that operation of a tower crane is stopped when the temperature in the vicinity of the crane is below the limit recommended in the manufacturer’s specifications or, if there are none, in specifications certified by a professional engineer.

Multiple cranes

107   If two or more tower cranes are erected in such a manner that the radii of operations overlap,

                                 (a)    the employer must ensure that operators are provided with a visual or auditory means of communicating with each other,

                                 (b)    the operators must be able to communicate with each other when both crane are in operation, and

                                 (c)    the operators must operate the cranes in such a manner that there are no collisions between the cranes or their loads.

Underground Shaft Hoists

Safety requirements

108(1)  An employer must ensure that an underground shaft hoist complies with the following:

                                 (a)    all supporting parts of the hoist machinery are set on and secured to a substantial foundation;

                                 (b)    it is equipped with positive drives for lifting and lowering the hoist cage;

                                 (c)    it does not have a clutch between the transmission and the hoist drums;

                                 (c)    it has a hoist drum with a spring‑activated drum friction brake capable of stopping and holding the total suspended load in a safe manner under all operating conditions;

                                 (d)    it has a hoist drum equipped with a positive spring‑activated pawl or similar device to lock the drum.

108(2)  An employer must ensure that an underground shaft hoist

                                 (a)    has a communication system available and working at all times between the hoist operator and workers at landings in the shaft leading to a tunnel or an underground space, and

                                 (b)    the controls of the communication system can be operated at all times at every landing in the shaft, on the hoist platform and at the operator’s position.

108(3)  An employer must ensure that in an emergency an additional means of communication is available and working at all times between the operator of a shaft hoist and workers at the face of the tunnelling operations.

108(4)  An employer must ensure that, if a code is used in a communication system in an underground shaft hoist, the code is prominently posted at all times at every landing in the shaft and at the operator’s controls.

Operator responsibilities

109(1)  The operator of an underground hoist must

                                 (a)    ensure that the brake remains on at all times until it is released manually,

                                 (b)    hold the hoist drum brake in the “OFF” position when lifting or lowering the hoist cage, and

                                 (c)    not lock out or otherwise disable the hoist drum brake when lifting or lowering the hoist cage.

109(2)  The operator of an underground hoist must not allow the hoist to travel at more than 1.2 metres per second when a worker is lifted or lowered in the hoist cage.

Hoist cage

110(1)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a hoist cage platform is equipped with a car locking device, and

                                 (b)    the shaft on which an underground shaft hoist is installed is equipped with guide rails.

110(2)  An employer must ensure that a hoist cage has a plate that

                                 (a)    states the maximum number of workers and the maximum load for which the hoist cage is designed,

                                 (b)    is secured to the hoist cage, and

                                 (c)    is clearly visible to the workers in the cage and the operator.

110(3)  A person must not use an open hook to attach a hoist cage to the hoisting line.

Unguided suspended cage

111(1)  Despite sections 108 to 110, an employer may use a suspended cage that does not have guide rails in an underground shaft if

                                 (a)    the movement of the cage is controlled by a crane,

                                 (b)    all sides and the top of the cage are enclosed by a screen of sufficient strength to protect any workers being transported in it, and

                                 (c)    a designated signaller at the surface has constant effective communication between the cage occupants and the crane operator.

111(2)  If a cage referred to in subsection (1) is used in an underground shaft that is more than 30 metres deep, the employer must ensure that the cage is designed and certified by a professional engineer.

111(3)  Section 347 does not apply to a cage referred to in subsection (1) or (2) when the cage is transporting workers.

Vehicle Hoists

Safety standards

112   An employer must ensure that a vehicle hoist installed on or after July 1, 2009 meets the requirements of the following:

                                 (a)    ANSI Standard ANSI/ALI ALCTV‑2006, American National Standard for Automotive Lifts — Safety Requirements for Construction, Testing and Validation, or

                                 (b)    ANSI Standard ANSI/ALI ALOIM‑2000, Automotive Lifts — Safety Requirements for Operation, Inspection and Maintenance.

Safe use

113(1)  An employer must ensure that a pneumatic or hydraulic vehicle hoist has controls operated by constant manual pressure.

113(2)  An employer must ensure that the operator of a vehicle hoist

                                 (a)    remains at the controls while the vehicle hoist is in motion, and

                                 (b)    does not block the controls during raising and lowering.

113(3)  A worker must not be under a suspended load unless the load is supported by

                                 (a)    a vehicle hoist designed for that purpose, or

                                 (b)    stands or blocks, other than jacks, that are designed, constructed and maintained to support the load and placed on firm foundations.

Winching Operations

Safe practices

114  An operator of a winch must ensure that, before vehicle‑mounted winch lines are hooked or unhooked from an object, the vehicle is prevented from moving.

Part 7
Emergency Preparedness
and Response

Emergency response plan

115(1)  An employer must establish an emergency response plan for responding to an emergency that may require rescue or evacuation.

115(2)  An employer must involve affected workers in establishing the emergency response plan.

115(3)  An employer must ensure that an emergency response plan is current.

Contents of plan

116   An emergency response plan must include the following:

                                 (a)    the identification of potential emergencies;

                                 (b)    procedures for dealing with the identified emergencies;

                                 (c)    the identification of, location of and operational procedures for emergency equipment;

                                 (d)    the emergency response training requirements;

                                 (e)    the location and use of emergency facilities;

                                 (f)    the fire protection requirements;

                                 (g)    the alarm and emergency communication requirements;

                                 (h)    the first aid services required;

                                  (i)    procedures for rescue and evacuation;

                                  (j)    the designated rescue and evacuation workers.

Rescue and evacuation workers

117(1)  An employer must designate the workers who will provide rescue services and supervise evacuation procedures in an emergency.

117(2)  An employer must ensure that designated rescue and emergency workers are trained in emergency response appropriate to the work site and the potential emergencies identified in the emergency response plan.

117(3)  The training under subsection (2) must include exercises appropriate to the work site that simulate the potential emergencies identified in the emergency response plan.

117(4)  The training exercises referred to in subsection (3) must be repeated at the intervals required to ensure that the designated rescue and evacuation workers  are competent to carry out their duties.

Equipment

118(1)  An employer must provide workers designated under section 117 with personal protective clothing and equipment appropriate to the work site and the potential emergencies identified in the emergency response plan.

118(2)  Workers who respond to an emergency must wear and use personal protective clothing and equipment appropriate to the work site and the emergency.

Part 8
Entrances, Walkways,
Stairways and Ladders

Entrances, Walkways, Stairways

Safe entry and exit

119(1)  An employer must ensure that every worker can enter a work area safely and leave a work area safely at all times.

119(2)  An employer must ensure that a work area’s entrances and exits are in good working order.

119(3)  An employer must ensure that a work area’s entrances and exits are free from materials, equipment, accumulations of waste or other obstructions that might endanger workers or restrict their movement.

119(4)  An employer must ensure that, if a worker could be isolated from a primary escape route,

                                 (a)    there is a ready, convenient and safe secondary means of escape from the work area, and

                                 (b)    the secondary escape route is readily useable at all times.

119(5)  An employer must ensure that all workers are familiar with escape routes from the work area.

Doors

120(1)  An employer must ensure that doors to and from a work area can be opened without substantial effort and are not obstructed.

120(2)  An employer must ensure that a door used to enter or leave an enclosed area that poses a hazard to workers entering the area

                                 (a)    is kept in good working order, and

                                 (b)    has a means of opening it from the inside at all times.

Walkways, runways and ramps

121(1)  An employer must ensure that a walkway, runway or ramp

                                 (a)    is strong enough to support the equipment and workers who may use it,

                                 (b)    is at least 600 millimetres wide,

                                 (c)    is wide enough to ensure the safe movement of equipment and workers, and

                                 (d)    has the appropriate toe boards and guardrails required by Part 22.

121(2)  An employer must ensure that the surface of a walkway, runway or ramp has sufficient traction to allow workers to move on it safely.

121(3)  In the case of a farming and ranching operation, the employer may perform a hazard assessment, as set out in Part 2, instead of complying with subsection (1)(b) and (d).

AR 87/2009 s121;152/2018

Stairways

122(1)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    the width of the treads and the height of the rise of a stairway are uniform throughout its length, and

                                 (b)    the treads of a stairway are level.

122(2)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a stairway with 5 or more risers has the appropriate handrail required by this Code, and

                                 (b)    a stairway with open sides has a handrail and an intermediate rail or equivalent safeguard on each open side.

122(3)  An employer must ensure that temporary stairs are at least 600 millimetres wide.

122(4)  In the case of a farming and ranching operation, the employer may perform a hazard assessment, as set out in Part 2, instead of complying with subsection (1), (2) or (3).

AR 87/2009 s122;152/2018

Handrails on stairways

123(1)  This section applies to stairways with 5 or more risers.

123(2)  An employer must ensure that a stairway is equipped with a handrail that

                                 (a)    extends the entire length of the stairway,

                                 (b)    is secured and cannot be dislodged,

                                 (c)    is between 800 millimetres and 920 millimetres above the front edge of the treads, and

                                 (d)    is substantial and constructed of lumber that is not less than 38 millimetres by 89 millimetres or material with properties the same as or better than those of lumber.

123(3)    An employer must ensure that posts supporting a handrail

                                 (a)    are spaced not more than 3 metres apart at their vertical centres, and

                                 (b)    are constructed of lumber that is not less than 38 millimetres by 89 millimetres or materials with properties the same as or better than those of lumber.

123(4)  In the case of a farming and ranching operation, the employer may perform a hazard assessment, as set out in Part 2, instead of complying with subsection (1), (2) or (3).

AR 87/2009 s123;152/2018

Ladders — General

Restriction on use

124   An employer must ensure that workers do not use a ladder to enter or leave an elevated or sub‑level work area if the area has another safe and recognizable way to enter or leave it.

Prohibition on single rail

125   A person must not make a ladder by fastening cleats across a single rail or post.

Prohibition on painting

126(1)  Subject to subsection (2), a person must not paint a wooden ladder.

126(2)  A wooden ladder may be preserved with a transparent protective coating.

Use near energized electrical equipment

127   An employer must ensure that a ladder used during the servicing of energized or potentially energized electrical equipment is made of non‑conductive material.

Ladders on extending booms

128(1)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    if a ladder is a permanent part of an extending boom on powered mobile equipment, no worker is on the ladder during the articulation, extension or retraction of the boom, and

                                 (b)    if outriggers are incorporated in the equipment to provide stability, no worker climbs the ladder until the outriggers are deployed.

128(2)  Subsection (1)(a) does not apply to professional fire fighters working on fire fighting equipment.

Crawl Board or Roof Ladder

Safe use

129   An employer must ensure that a crawl board or roof ladder used for roof work

                                 (a)    is securely fastened by hooking the board or ladder over the ridge of the roof or by another equally effective means, and

                                 (b)    is not supported by an eaves trough.

Fixed Ladders

Design criteria

130(1)  An employer must ensure that a fixed ladder installed on or after April 30, 2004 meets the requirements of PIP Standard STF05501 (February 2002), Fixed Ladders and Cages, published by the Construction Industry Institute.

130(2)  Despite the standards referenced in PIP Standard STF05501, an employer may

                                 (a)    use applicable Canadian material and process standards if the employer ensures that the fixed ladder is designed and installed in accordance with established engineering principles, and

                                 (b)    allow the inside diameter of a cage hoop to be as great as 760 millimetres.

130(3)  If a fixed ladder is made of a material other than steel, the employer must ensure that the design is certified by a professional engineer as being as strong as or stronger than that required by PIP Standard STF05501.

130(4)  The employer must ensure that a self‑closing double bar safety gate, or equally effective barrier, is provided at ladderway floor openings and platforms of fixed ladders installed on or after April 30, 2004.

130(5)  Subsection (4) does not apply at landings.

130(6)  Section 327 applies to an access ladder attached to a scaffold.

130(7)  In the case of a farming and ranching operation, subsections (1) through (6) must be complied with unless a person who is competent or a service provider who is competent provides safe work procedures for workers using fixed ladders.

AR 87/2009 s130;152/2018

Fixed ladders in manholes

131   Despite section 130, fixed ladders used in pre‑cast reinforced concrete manhole sections installed on or after July 1, 2009 must meet the requirements of ASTM Standard C478‑07, Standard Specification for Reinforced Concrete Manhole Sections.

Rest platform exemption

132   If each worker working on a drilling rig or service rig on a fixed ladder is equipped with and wears a climb assist device that complies with the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, an employer is not required to

                                 (a)    provide the ladder with rest platforms, or

                                 (b)    have the side rails extend not less than 1050 millimetres above the point at which the workers get on or off.

Portable Ladders

Prohibition

133(1)  A worker must not perform work from either of the top two rungs, steps or cleats of a portable ladder unless the manufacturer’s specifications allow the worker to do so.

133(2)  Despite subsection (1), a worker may work from either of the top two rungs, steps or treads of a stepladder,

                                 (a)    if the stepladder has a railed platform at the top, or

                                 (b)    if the manufacturer’s specifications for the stepladder permit it.

Constructed portable ladder

134(1)  An employer must ensure that a constructed portable ladder

                                 (a)    is constructed of lumber that is free of loose knots or knot holes,

                                 (b)    with a length of 5 metres or less has side rails constructed of lumber measuring not less than 38 millimetres by 89 millimetres,

                                 (c)    more than 5 metres long has side rails constructed of lumber measuring not less than 38 millimetres by 140 millimetres,

                                 (d)    has side rails that are not notched, dapped, tapered or spliced,

                                 (e)    has side rails at least 500 millimetres apart at the bottom, and

                                 (f)    has rungs that are

                                           (i)    constructed of lumber measuring not less than 21 millimetres by 89 millimetres,

                                          (ii)    held by filler blocks or secured by a single continuous wire, and

                                         (iii)    uniformly spaced at a centre to centre distance of 250 millimetres to 300 millimetres.

134(2)  An employer must ensure that a two‑way constructed portable ladder that is wide enough to permit traffic in both directions at the same time,

                                 (a)    has a centre structural rail along the length of the ladder,

                                 (b)    is at least one metre wide, and

                                 (c)    is constructed of materials that are substantial enough in size to accommodate the maximum intended load.

Manufactured portable ladder

135   An employer must ensure that a portable ladder manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 meets the requirements of

                                 (a)    CSA Standard CAN3‑Z11‑M81 (R2005), Portable Ladders,

                                 (b)    ANSI Standard A14.1‑2007, American National Standard for Ladders — Wood — Safety Requirements,

                                 (c)    ANSI Standard A14.2‑2007, American National Standard for Ladders — Portable Metal — Safety Requirements, or

                                 (d)    ANSI Standard A14.5‑2007, American National Standard for Ladders — Portable Reinforced Plastic — Safety Requirements.

Securing and positioning

136   A worker must ensure that

                                 (a)    a portable ladder is secured against movement and placed on a base that is stable,

                                 (b)    the base of an inclined portable ladder is no further from the base of the wall or structure than one‑quarter of the distance between the base of the ladder and the place where the ladder contacts the wall, and

                                 (c)    the side rails of a portable ladder extend at least 1 metre above a platform, landing or parapet if the ladder is used as a means of access to the platform, landing or parapet.

Fall protection

137(1)  An employer must ensure that a worker working from a portable ladder from which the worker may fall 3 metres or more uses a personal fall arrest system.

137(2)  Subsection (1) does not apply while the worker is moving up or down the portable ladder.

137(3)  Despite subsection (1), if it is not reasonably practical to use a personal fall arrest system, a worker may work from a portable ladder without fall protection if

                                 (a)    the work is a light duty task of short duration at each location,

                                 (b)    the worker’s centre of balance is at the centre of the ladder at all times even with an arm extended beyond the side rails of the ladder, and

                                 (c)    the worker maintains three‑point contact whenever the worker extends an arm beyond a side rail.

Part 9
Fall Protection

Rescue personnel exemption

138   Rescue personnel involved in training or in providing emergency rescue services may use equipment and practices other than those specified in this Part.

General protection

139(1)  An employer and a supervisor, or a self-employed person, must ensure that a worker is protected from falling if a worker may fall,

                                 (a)    at a temporary or permanent work area, a vertical distance of 3 metres or more,

                                 (b)    at a temporary or permanent work area, a vertical distance of less than 3 metres if there is an unusual possibility of injury,

                                 (c)    at a temporary or permanent work area, into or onto a hazardous substance or object, or through an opening in a work surface, or

                                 (d)    at a permanent work area, a vertical distance of more than 1.2 metres and less than 3 metres.

139(2)  For the purposes of this section, there is an unusual possibility of injury if the injury may be worse than an injury from landing on a solid, flat surface.

139(3)  Subject to subsection (5), an employer or a self-employed person must install a guardrail.

139(4)  Repealed AR 56/2018 s12.

139(5)  Subject to subsection (6), if the use of a guardrail is not reasonably practicable, an employer and a supervisor, or a self-employed person, must ensure that a worker uses a travel restraint system that meets the requirements of this Part.

139(6)  Subject to subsection (7), if the use of a travel restraint system is not reasonably practicable, an employer and a supervisor, or a self-employed person, must ensure that a worker uses a personal fall arrest system that meets the requirements of this Part.

139(7)  If the use of a personal fall arrest system is not reasonably practicable, an employer and a supervisor, or a self-employed person, must ensure that a worker uses an equally effective fall protection system.

139(8)  A worker must use a fall protection system as required by this section.

AR 87/2009 s139;56/2018

Fall protection plan

140(1)  An employer must develop procedures that comply with this Part in a fall protection plan for a work site if a worker at the work site may fall 3 metres or more and the worker is not protected by guardrails.

140(2)  A fall protection plan must specify

                                 (a)    the fall hazards at the work site,

                                 (b)    the fall protection system to be used at the work site,

                                 (c)    the anchors to be used during the work,

                                 (d)    that clearance distances below the work area, if applicable, have been confirmed as sufficient to prevent a worker from striking the ground or an object or level below the work area,

                                 (e)    the procedures used to assemble, maintain, inspect, use and disassemble the fall protection system, where applicable, and

                                 (f)    the rescue procedures to be used if a worker falls and is suspended by a personal fall arrest system or safety net and needs to be rescued.

140(3)  The employer must ensure that the fall protection plan is available at the work site and is reviewed with workers before work with a risk of falling begins.

140(4)  The employer must ensure that the plan is updated when conditions affecting fall protection change.

Instruction of workers

141(1)  An employer must ensure that a worker is trained in the safe use of the fall protection system before allowing the worker to work in an area where a fall protection system must be used.

141(2)  The training referred to in subsection (1) must include the following:

                                 (a)    a review of current Alberta legislation pertaining to fall protection;

                                 (b)    an understanding of what a fall protection plan is;

                                 (c)    fall protection methods a worker is required to use at a work site;

                                 (d)    identification of fall hazards;

                                 (e)    assessment and selection of specific anchors that the worker may use;

                                 (f)    instructions for the correct use of connecting hardware;

                                 (g)    information about the effect of a fall on the human body, including

                                           (i)    maximum arresting force,

                                          (ii)    the purpose of shock and energy absorbers,

                                         (iii)    swing fall,

                                         (iv)    free fall;

                                 (h)    pre‑use inspection;

                                  (i)    emergency response procedures to be used at the work site, if necessary; and

                                  (j)    practice in

                                           (i)    inspecting, fitting, adjusting and connecting fall protection systems and components, and

                                          (ii)    emergency response procedures.

141(3)  In addition to the training described in subsection (2), an employer must ensure that a worker is made aware of the fall hazards particular to that work site and the steps being taken to eliminate or control those hazards.

Full body harness

142(1)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a full body harness manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 is approved to

                                           (i)    CSA Standard CAN/CSA Z259.10‑06, Full Body Harnesses,

                                          (ii)    ANSI/ASSE Standard Z359.1‑2007, Safety requirements for personal fall arrest systems, subsystems and components, or

                                         (iii)    CEN Standard EN 361: 2007, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height — Full body harnesses, and

                                 (b)    a worker using a personal fall arrest system wears and uses a full body harness.

142(2)  A worker using a personal fall arrest system must wear and use a full body harness.

Body belt

142.1   An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a body belt manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 is approved to

                                           (i)    CSA Standard Z259.1‑05, Body belts and saddles for work positioning and travel restraint,

                                          (ii)    ANSI/ASSE Standard A10.32‑2004, Fall Protection Systems – American National Standard for Construction and Demolition Operations, or

                                         (iii)    CEN Standard EN 358: 2000, Personal protective equipment for work positioning and prevention of falls from a height — Belts for work positioning and restraint and work positioning lanyards, and

                                 (b)    a worker uses a body belt only as part of a travel restraint system or as part of a fall restrict system.

Lanyard

142.2(1)  An employer must ensure that a lanyard manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 is approved to

                                 (a)    CSA Standard Z259.11‑05, Energy absorbers and lanyards,

                                 (b)    ANSI/ASSE Standard Z359.1‑2007, Safety requirements for personal fall arrest systems, subsystems and components, or

                                 (c)    CEN Standard EN 354: 2002, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height — Lanyards.

142.2(2)  An employer must ensure that a lanyard used by a worker is made of wire rope or other material appropriate to the hazard if a tool or corrosive agent that could sever, abrade or burn a lanyard is used in the work area.

142.2(3)   Despite subsection (2), if a worker works near an energized conductor or in a work area where a lanyard made of conductive material cannot be used safely, the employer must ensure that the worker uses another effective means of fall protection.

Shock absorber

142.3(1)  An employer must ensure that if a shock absorber or shock absorbing lanyard is used as part of a personal fall arrest system, it is approved to one of the following standards if manufactured on or after July 1, 2009:

                                 (a)    CSA Standard Z259.11‑05, Energy absorbers and lanyards;

                                 (b)    ANSI/ASSE Standard Z359.1‑2007, Safety requirements for personal fall arrest systems, subsystems and components; or

                                 (c)    CEN Standard EN 355: 2002, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height – Energy absorbers.

142.3(2)  An employer must ensure that a personal fall arrest system consists of a full body harness and a lanyard equipped with a shock absorber or similar device.

142.3(3)  Despite subsection (2), a shock absorber or similar device is not required if the personal fall arrest system is used in accordance with section 151.

142.3(4)  Despite subsection (2), a shock absorber is required with a fixed ladder fall arrest system only if it is required by the manufacturer of the system.

Connectors, carabiners and snap hooks

143(1)  An employer must ensure that connecting components of a fall arrest system consisting of carabiners, D‑rings, O‑rings, oval rings, self‑locking connectors and snap hooks manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 are approved, as applicable, to

                                 (a)    CSA Standard Z259.12‑01 (R2006), Connecting Components for Personal Fall Arrest Systems (PFAS),

                                 (b)    ANSI/ASSE Standard Z359.1‑2007, Safety requirements for personal fall arrest systems, subsystems and components,

                                 (c)    CEN Standard EN 362: 2004, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height – Connectors, or

                                 (d)    CEN Standard 12275: 1998, Mountaineering equipment – Connectors – Safety requirements and test methods.

143(2)  An employer must ensure that a carabiner or snap hook

                                 (a)    is self‑closing and self‑locking,

                                 (b)    may only be opened by at least two consecutive deliberate manual actions, and

                                 (c)    is marked with

                                           (i)    its breaking strength in the major axis, and

                                          (ii)    the name or trademark of the manufacturer.

Fall arresters

144   An employer must ensure that a fall arrestor manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 is approved to

                                 (a)    CSA Standard Z259.2.1‑98 (R2004), Fall Arresters, Vertical Lifelines, and Rails,

                                 (b)    ANSI/ASSE Standard Z359.1‑2007, Safety requirements for personal fall arrest systems, subsystems and components, or

                                 (c)    CEN Standard EN 353‑2: 2002, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height – Part 2: Guided type fall arrestors including a flexible anchor line.

Self‑retracting device

145   An employer must ensure that a self‑retracting device manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 and used with a personal fall arrest system is

                                 (a)    approved to CSA Standard Z259.2.2‑98 (R2004), Self‑Retracting Devices for Personal Fall‑Arrest Systems,

                                 (b)    anchored above the worker’s head unless the manufacturer’s specifications allow the use of a different anchor location, and

                                 (c)    used in a manner that minimizes the hazards of swinging and limits the swing drop distance to 1.2 metres if a worker falls.

Descent control device

146   An employer must ensure that an automatic or manual descent control device manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 and used with a personal fall arrest system is approved to

                                 (a)    CSA Standard Z259.2.3‑99 (R2004), Descent Control Devices,

                                 (b)    CEN Standard EN 341: 1997, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height – Descender devices, or

                                 (c)    NFPA Standard 1983, Standard on Life Safety Rope and Equipment for Emergency Services, 2006 edition, classified as general or light duty.

Life safety rope

147(1)  An employer must ensure that a life safety rope manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 and used in a fall protection system

                                 (a)    is approved to

                                           (i)    NFPA Standard 1983, Standard on Life Safety Rope and Equipment for Emergency Services, 2006 Edition, as light‑use or general‑use life safety rope,

                                          (ii)    CEN Standard EN 1891: 1998, Personal protective equipment for the prevention of falls from a height — Low stretch kernmantle ropes, as Type A rope, or

                                 (b)    meets the requirements of

                                           (i)    CSA Standard CAN/CSA‑Z259.2.1‑98 (R2004), Fall Arresters, Vertical Lifelines, and Rails, or

                                          (ii)    ANSI/ASSE Standard Z359.1‑2007, Safety requirements for personal fall arrest systems, subsystems and components.

147(2)  An employer must ensure that a life safety rope used in a fall protection system

                                 (a)    extends downward to within 1.2 metres of ground level or another safe lower surface,

                                 (b)    is free of knots or splices throughout the travel portion except for a stopper knot at its lower end,

                                 (c)    is effectively protected to prevent abrasion by sharp or rough edges,

                                 (d)    is made of material appropriate to the hazard and able to withstand adverse effects, and

                                 (e)    is installed and used in a manner that minimizes the hazards of swinging and limits the swing drop distance to 1.2 metres if a worker falls.

147(3)  A worker must use a vertical life safety rope in a manner that minimizes the hazards of swinging and limits the swing drop distance to 1.2 metres if a worker falls.

147(4)  An employer must ensure that only one worker is attached to a life safety rope at any one time unless the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer allow for the attachment of more than one worker.

Adjustable lanyard for work positioning

148   An employer must ensure that an adjustable lanyard manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 and used by a worker as part of a work positioning system is approved to

                                 (a)    CSA Standard Z259.11‑05, Energy absorbers and lanyards, as a Class F adjustable positioning lanyard, or

                                 (b)    CEN Standard EN 358: 2000, Personal protective equipment for work positioning and prevention of falls from a height — Belts for work positioning and restraint and work positioning lanyards.

Rope adjustment device for work positioning

148.1   An employer must ensure that a rope adjustment device manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 and used by a worker as part of a work positioning system is approved to

                                 (a)    CSA Standard Z259.2.3‑99 (R2004), Descent Control Devices,

                                 (b)    CEN Standard EN 341: 1997, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height – Descender devices, or

                                 (c)    NFPA Standard 1983, Standard on Life Safety Rope and Equipment for Emergency Services, 2006 Edition, classified as general or light duty.

Wood pole climbing

149(1)  An employer must ensure that a worker working on or from a wood pole uses fall restrict equipment that is approved to CSA Standard Z259.14‑01, Fall Restrict Equipment for Wood Pole Climbing, in combination with

                                 (a)    a lineman’s body belt that 

                                           (i)    is approved to CSA Standard Z259.3‑M1978 (R2003), Lineman’s Body Belt and Lineman’s Safety Strap, or

                                          (ii)    complies with section 142.1, or

                                 (b)    a full body harness that complies with subsection 142(1).

149(2)  Subsection (1) does not apply to fall restrict equipment or a lineman’s body belt in use before April 30, 2004.

Equipment compatibility

150   An employer must ensure that all components of a fall protection system are compatible with one another and with the environment in which they are used.

Inspection and maintenance

150.1   An employer must ensure that the equipment used as part of a fall protection system is

                                 (a)    inspected by the worker as required by the manufacturer before it is used on each work shift,

                                 (b)    kept free from substances and conditions that could contribute to deterioration of the equipment, and

                                 (c)    re‑certified as specified by the manufacturer.

Removal from service

150.2(1)  An employer must ensure that equipment used as part of a fall protection system is removed from service and either returned to the manufacturer or destroyed if

                                 (a)    it is defective, or

                                 (b)    it has come into contact with excessive heat, a chemical, or any other substance that may corrode or otherwise damage the fall protection system.

150.2(2)  An employer must ensure that after a personal fall arrest system has stopped a fall, the system is removed from service.

150.2(3)  An employer must ensure that a personal fall arrest system that is removed from service is not returned to service unless a professional engineer or the manufacturer certifies that the system is safe to use.

Prusik and similar knots

150.3   An employer must ensure that a Prusik or similar sliding hitch knot is used in place of a fall arrester only during emergency situations or during training for emergency situations and only by a competent worker.

Clearance, maximum arresting force and swing

151(1)  An employer must ensure that a personal fall arrest system is arranged so that a worker cannot hit the ground, an object which poses an unusual possibility of injury, or a level below the work area.

151(2)  An employer must ensure that a personal fall arrest system without a shock absorber limits a worker’s free fall distance to 1.2 metres.

151(3)  An employer must ensure that a personal fall arrest system limits the maximum arresting force on a worker to 6 kilonewtons, unless the worker is using an E6 type shock absorber in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, in which case the maximum arresting force must not exceed 8 kilonewtons.

151(4)  A worker must limit the vertical distance of a fall by

                                 (a)    selecting the shortest length lanyard that will still permit unimpeded performance of the worker’s duties, and

                                 (b)    securing the lanyard to an anchor no lower than the worker’s shoulder height.

151(5)  If the shoulder height anchor required by subsection 4(b) is not available, a worker must secure the lanyard to an anchor that is located as high as is reasonably practicable.

151(6)  If it is not reasonably practicable to attach to an anchor above the level of a worker’s feet, the worker must ensure that the clearance and maximum arresting force requirements of subsections (1) and (3) are met.

Anchors

Anchor strength — permanent

152(1)  An employer must ensure that a permanent anchor is capable of safely withstanding the impact forces applied to it and has a minimum breaking strength per attached worker of 16 kilonewtons or two times the maximum arresting force in any direction in which the load may be applied.

152(2)  Subsection (1) does not apply to anchors installed before July 1, 2009.

152(3)  Subsection (1) does not apply to the anchors of flexible horizontal lifeline systems that must meet the requirements of subsection 153(1).

152(4)  The employer must ensure that an anchor rated at two times the maximum arresting force is designed, installed and used in accordance with

                                 (a)    the manufacturer’s specifications, or

                                 (b)    specifications certified by a professional engineer.

Anchor strength — temporary

152.1(1)  An employer must ensure that a temporary anchor used in a travel restraint system

                                 (a)    has a minimum breaking strength in any direction in which the load may be applied of at least 3.5 kilonewtons per worker attached,

                                 (b)    is installed, used and removed according to the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer,

                                 (c)    is permanently marked as being for travel restraint only, and

                                 (d)    is removed from use on the earliest of

                                           (i)    the date on which the work project for which it is intended is completed, or

                                          (ii)    the time specified by the manufacturer or professional engineer.

152.1(2)  An employer must ensure that a temporary anchor used in a personal fall arrest system

                                 (a)    has a minimum breaking strength in any direction in which the load may be applied of at least 16 kilonewtons or two times the maximum arresting force per worker attached,

                                 (b)    is installed, used and removed according to the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, and,

                                 (c)    is removed from use on the earliest of

                                           (i)    the date on which the work project for which it is intended is completed, or

                                          (ii)    the time specified by the manufacturer or professional engineer.

Duty to use anchors

152.2(1)  If a worker uses a personal fall arrest system or a travel restraint system, the worker must ensure that it is safely secured to an anchor that meets the requirements of this Part.

152.2(2)  An employer must ensure that a worker visually inspects the anchor prior to attaching a fall protection system.

152.2(3)  An employer must ensure that a worker does not use a damaged anchor until the anchor is repaired, replaced or re‑certified by the manufacturer or a professional engineer.

152.2(4)  An employer must ensure that a worker uses an anchor connector appropriate to the work.

152.2(5)  A worker must use an anchor connector appropriate to the work,

Independence of anchors

152.3   An employer must ensure that an anchor to which a personal fall arrest system is attached is not part of an anchor used to support or suspend a platform.

Wire rope sling as anchor

152.4   An employer must ensure that a wire rope sling used as an anchor is terminated at both ends with a Flemish eye splice rated to at least 90 percent of the wire rope’s minimum breaking strength.

Flexible and rigid horizontal lifeline systems

153(1)  An employer must ensure that a flexible horizontal lifeline system manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 meets the requirements of

                                 (a)    CSA Standard Z259.13‑04, Flexible Horizontal Lifeline Systems, or

                                 (b)    the applicable requirements of CSA Standard Z259.16‑04, Design of Active Fall‑Protection Systems.

153(2)  An employer must ensure that a rigid horizontal fall protection system is designed, installed and used in accordance with

                                 (a)    the manufacturer’s specifications, or

                                 (b)    specifications certified by a professional engineer.

Installation of horizontal lifeline systems

153.1   An employer must ensure that before a horizontal lifeline system is used, a professional engineer, a competent person authorized by the professional engineer, the manufacturer, or a competent person authorized by the manufacturer certifies that the system has been properly installed according to the manufacturer’s specifications or to specifications certified by a professional engineer.

Fixed ladders and climbable structures

154(1)  An employer must ensure that if a worker is working from or on a fixed ladder or climbable structure at a height of 3 metres or more and is not protected by a guardrail, continuous protection from falling is provided by

                                 (a)    equipping the fixed ladder or climbable structure with an integral fall protection system that meets the requirements of

                                           (i)    CSA Standard Z259.2.1‑98 (R2004), Fall Arresters, Vertical Lifelines, and Rails, or

                                          (ii)    ANSI/ASSE Standard Z359.1‑2007, Safety requirements for personal fall arrest systems, subsystems and components, or

                                 (b)    an alternate fall protection system.

154(2)  Subsection (1) applies to fixed ladders and climbable structures constructed and installed after July 1, 2009.

Fall protection on vehicles and loads

155(1)  If a worker may have to climb onto a vehicle or its load at any location where it is not reasonably practicable to provide a fall protection system for the worker, an employer must

                                 (a)    take steps to eliminate or reduce the need for the worker to climb onto the vehicle or its load, and

                                 (b)    ensure that the requirements of subsection 159(2) are met.

155(2)  In addition to the requirements of subsection (1), an employer must ensure that if a load is not secured against movement, a worker does not climb onto the load.

155(3)  A worker must not climb onto a load if the load is not secured against movement.

Boom‑supported work platforms and aerial devices

156(1)  An employer must ensure that a worker on a boom‑supported elevating work platform, boom‑supported aerial device, or forklift truck work platform uses a personal fall arrest system

                                 (a)    connected to

                                           (i)    an anchor specified by the manufacturer of the work platform, aerial device or forklift truck, or

                                          (ii)    if no anchor is specified by the manufacturer, an anchor point certified by a professional engineer that meets the requirements of CSA Standard Z259.16‑04, Design of Active Fall‑Protection Systems, and

                                 (b)    when connected to the anchor, the lanyard, if reasonably practicable, is short enough to prevent the worker from being ejected from the work platform or aerial device but is long enough to allow the worker to perform his or her work.

156(2)  An employer must ensure  that a worker on a scissor lift or on an elevating work platform with similar characteristics uses a travel restraint system consisting of a full body harness and lanyard

                                 (a)    connected to an anchor specified by the manufacturer of the scissor lift or elevating work platform, and

                                 (b)    when connected to the anchor, the lanyard, if reasonably practicable, is short enough to prevent the worker from falling out of the scissor lift or elevating work platform but is long enough to allow the worker to perform his or her work.

156(3)  Subsection (2) does not apply if

                                 (a)    the manufacturer’s specifications allow a worker to work from the scissor lift or elevating work platform with similar characteristics using only its guardrails for fall protection, and

                                 (b)    the scissor lift or elevating work platform is operating on a firm, substantially level surface.

156(4)  Despite subsection (2), if a worker’s movement cannot be adequately restricted in all directions by the travel restraint system, the employer must ensure that the worker uses a personal fall arrest system.

Water danger

157   An employer must ensure that a worker uses an appropriate fall protection system in combination with a life jacket or personal flotation device if the worker

                                 (a)    may fall into water that exposes the worker to the hazard of drowning, or

                                 (b)    could drown from falling into the water, from other than a boat.

Leading edge fall protection system

158   An employer using a leading edge fall protection system consisting of fabric or netting panels must ensure that

                                 (a)    the system is used only to provide leading edge fall protection,

                                 (b)    the system is used and installed according to the manufacturer’s specifications,

                                 (c)    a copy of the manufacturer’s specifications for the system is available to workers at the work site at which the system is being used,

                                 (d)    the fabric or netting is

                                           (i)    drop‑tested at the work site in accordance with the requirements of 29 CFR Section 1926.502(C)4(i) published by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or

                                          (ii)    certified as safe for use by a professional engineer, and

                                 (e)    all workers using the system are trained in its use and limitations.

Procedures in place of fall protection equipment

159(1)   An employer may develop and use procedures in place of fall protection equipment in accordance with subsection (2), if

                                 (a)    it is not reasonably practicable to use one of the fall protection systems described in this Part, and

                                 (b)    use of procedures in place of fall protection equipment is restricted to  the following situations:

                                           (i)    the installation or removal of fall protection equipment;

                                          (ii)    roof inspection;

                                         (iii)    emergency repairs;

                                         (iv)    at‑height transfers between equipment and structures if allowed by the manufacturer’s specifications; and

                                          (v)    situations in which a worker must work on top of a vehicle or load and the requirements of section 155 have been met.

159(1.1)  Subsection (1)(b) does not apply to a farming and ranching operation employer.

159(2)  An employer using procedures in place of fall protection equipment must ensure that

                                 (a)    a hazard assessment in accordance with the requirements of Part 2 is completed before work at height begins,

                                 (b)    the procedures to be followed while performing the work must be in writing and available to workers before the work begins,

                                 (c)    the work is carried out in such a way that minimizes the number of workers exposed to a fall hazard while work is performed,

                                 (d)    the work is limited to light duty tasks of limited duration,

                                 (e)    the worker performing the work is competent to do it,

                                 (f)    when used for inspection, investigation or assessment activities, these activities take place prior to the actual start of work or after work has been completed, and

                                 (g)    the procedures do not expose a worker to additional hazards.

AR 87/2009 s159;152/2018

Work positioning

160(1)  An employer must ensure that if a worker uses a work positioning system, the worker’s vertical free fall distance in the event of a fall is restricted by the work positioning system to 600 millimetres or less.

160(2)  If the centre of gravity of a worker using a work positioning system extends beyond an edge from which the worker could fall or if the work surface presents a slipping or tripping hazard because of its state or condition, an employer must ensure that the worker uses a back‑up personal fall arrest system in combination with the work positioning system.

160(3)  A worker must use a back‑up personal fall arrest system in combination with the work positioning system if the worker’s centre of gravity extends beyond an edge from which the worker could fall or if the work surface presents a slipping or tripping hazard because of its state or condition.

Control zones

161(1)  If a control zone is used, an employer must ensure that it

                                 (a)    is only used if a worker can fall from a surface that has a slope of no more than 4 degrees toward an unguarded edge or that slopes inwardly away from an unguarded edge, and

                                 (b)    is not less than 2 metres wide when measured from the unguarded edge.

161(2)  An employer must not use a control zone to protect workers from falling from a skeletal structure that is a work area.

161(3)  If a worker will at all times remain further from the unguarded edge than the width of the control zone, no other fall protection system need be used.

161(4)  Despite section 139, a worker is not required to use a fall protection system when crossing the control zone to enter or leave the work area.

161(5)  When crossing a control zone referred to in subsections (3) and (4), to get to or from the unguarded edge, a worker must follow the most direct route.

161(6)  An employer must ensure that a control zone is clearly marked with an effective raised warning line or another equally effective method if a worker is working within 2 metres of the control zone.

161(7)  An employer must ensure that a worker who must work within a control zone uses

                                 (a)    a travel restraint system, or

                                 (b)    an equally effective means of preventing the worker from getting to the unguarded edge.

161(8)  A person who is not directly required for the work at hand must not be inside a control zone.

Part 10
Fire and Explosion Hazards

Flammable or explosive atmospheres a hazard

161.1  Flammable or explosive atmospheres are considered a hazard for the purposes of Part 2.

General Protection and Prevention

Prohibitions

162(1)  A person must not enter or work at a work area if more than 20 percent of the lower explosive limit of a flammable or explosive substance is present in the atmosphere.

162(2)  Subsection (1) does not apply to a competent, properly equipped worker who is responding in an emergency.

162(3)  A person must not smoke in a work area where a flammable substance is stored, handled, processed or used.

162(3.1)  A person must not use an open flame, except in accordance with section 169, in a work area where a flammable substance is stored, handled, processed or used.

162(4)  A person must not mix, clean or use a flammable or combustible liquid at a temperature at or above its flash point in an open vessel if a potential source of ignition is in the immediate vicinity of the activity.

162(5)  A person must not use a flammable or combustible liquid at a temperature above its flash point in a washing or cleaning operation, unless the washing or cleaning equipment is specifically designed and manufactured for the use of the liquid.

162(6)  A person must not store contaminated rags used to clean or wipe up flammable substances other than in a covered container that has a label that clearly indicates it is to be used for the storage of contaminated rags.

Classification of work sites

162.1(1)  If the hazard assessment required by Part 2 determines that a work area is a hazardous location, an employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a professional engineer, or a competent person authorized by a professional engineer, divides and classifies the work area in accordance with section 18 of the Canadian Electrical Code,

                                 (b)    for any work area falling under the Code for Electrical Installations at Oil and Gas Facilities, the area is divided and classified in accordance with rules 19‑102 to 19‑108 of that Code,

                                 (c)    for any work area consisting of facilities described in section 20 of the Canadian Electrical Code, the area is divided and classified in accordance with section 20 of the Canadian Electrical Code, and

                                 (d)    adequate documentation is prepared and maintained by a competent person, outlining the boundaries of the classified area and any specific measures to be taken to prevent the unintentional ignition of an explosive atmosphere.

162.1(2)  If the hazard assessment required by Part 2 indicates that the basis of an area classification under subsection (1) has changed, an employer must review and update that classification.

Procedures and precautions

163(1)  Repealed.

163(2)  If the hazard assessment required by Part 2 determines that a work area is not a hazardous location, an employer must ensure that flammable substances stored or used at the work area,

                                 (a)    will not be in sufficient quantity to produce an explosive atmosphere if inadvertently released,

                                 (b)    are not stored within 30 metres of an underground shaft,

                                 (c)    are not stored in the immediate vicinity of the air intake of

                                           (i)    a ventilation supply system,

                                          (ii)    an internal combustion engine, or

                                         (iii)    the fire box of a fired heater or furnace,

                                     and

                                 (d)    are stored only in containers approved to

                                           (i)    CSA Standard B376‑M1980 (R2008), Portable Containers for Gasoline and Other Petroleum Fuels,

                                          (ii)    NFPA Standard 30, Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code, 2008 Edition, or

                                         (iii)    ULC Standard C30‑1995, Containers, Safety,

                                          if manufactured on or after July 1, 2009.

163(2.1)  If the work requires that the contents of metallic or conductive containers be transferred from one container to another, an employer must ensure that static electricity is controlled while the contents are being transferred.

163(3)  Moved to section 165(3).

Contaminated clothing and skin

164(1)  If a worker’s clothing is contaminated with a flammable or combustible liquid, the worker must

                                 (a)    avoid any activity where a spark or open flame  may be created or exists,

                                 (b)    remove the clothing at the earliest possible time in a manner consistent with clause (a), and

                                 (c)    ensure that the clothing is decontaminated before it is used again.

164(2)  If a worker’s skin is contaminated with a flammable or combustible liquid, the worker must wash the skin at the earliest possible time.

Protective procedures and precautions in hazardous locations

165(1)  Repealed

165(2)  Repealed

165(3)  An employer must ensure that in a hazardous location,

                                 (a)    equipment used will not ignite a flammable substance, and

                                 (b)    static electricity is controlled,

                                           (i)    in the case of conductive containers for flammable or combustible liquids while the contents are being transferred, by electrically bonding the containers to one another and electrically grounding them, and

                                          (ii)    in other cases, by some other effective means.

165(4)  An employer must ensure that, if a work area is determined to be a hazardous location, the boundaries of the hazardous location are

                                 (a)    clearly identified to warn workers of the nature of the hazards associated with the presence of the flammable substance in that work area, or

                                 (b)    fenced off to prevent workers or equipment from entering the area without authorization.

165(5)  If reasonably practicable, an employer must ensure that procedures and precautionary measures are developed for a hazardous location that will prevent the inadvertent release of

                                 (a)    a flammable substance, or

                                 (b)    oxygen gas if it can contact a flammable substance.

165(6)  Despite subsection (5), if it is not reasonably practicable to develop procedures and precautionary measures that will prevent release, an employer must develop procedures and precautionary measures that will prevent an explosive atmosphere from igniting in a hazardous location.

Internal combustion engines

166(1)  An employer must ensure that an internal combustion engine in a hazardous location has a combustion air intake and exhaust discharge that are

                                 (a)    equipped with a flame arresting device, or

                                 (b)    located outside the hazardous location.

166(2)  An employer must ensure that all the surfaces of an internal combustion engine that are exposed to the atmosphere in a hazardous location are

                                 (a)    at a temperature lower than the temperature that would ignite a flammable substance present in the hazardous location, or

                                 (b)    shielded or blanketed in such a way as to prevent any flammable substance present in the hazardous location from contacting the surface.

166(2.1)  If it is not reasonably practicable to comply with subsection (2), an employer must ensure that another effective safeguard is established.

166(3)  Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply to a vehicle that is powered by an internal combustion engine.

166(4)  An employer must ensure that a vehicle powered by an internal combustion engine is not located or operated in a hazardous location except in accordance with section 169.

166(5)  An employer must ensure that an internal combustion engine is not located in a Zone 0 hazardous location as defined in the Canadian Electrical Code or in a part of a Division 1 hazardous location that meets the description of a Zone 0 location as defined in the Canadian Electrical Code.

166(6)  An employer must ensure that an internal combustion engine is not located in a Zone 1 or Division 1 hazardous location as defined in the Canadian Electrical Code unless it is equipped with combustible gas monitoring equipment in accordance with section 18 of the Canadian Electrical Code.

166(7)  An employer must ensure that an internal combustion engine is not located in a Class II, Division 1 or a Class III, Division 1 hazardous location as defined in the Canadian Electrical Code.

Flare stacks, flare pits and flares

167   An employer must ensure that open flames from flare pits, flare stacks or flares are not less than 25 metres beyond the boundary of a hazardous location.

Industrial furnaces and fired heaters

168(1)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a gas or oil fired furnace is designed, operated, monitored, controlled and maintained in a manner that minimizes the possibility of internal explosion of the fire box, and

                                 (b)    if the furnace is heating flammable substances, there are no connections between the process medium supply system and the fuel supply system or another system connected to the inside of the fire box of the furnace.

168(2)  An employer must ensure that the heated substance systems referred to in subsection (1)(b) are not isolated using inserted blinds or a double block and bleed system.

168(3)  A worker must not attempt to ignite a furnace manually, or to re‑ignite a furnace after shutdown, until

                                 (a)    explosive concentrations of flammable substances are eliminated from the fire box by purging or removed by another effective means, and

                                 (b)    tests or procedures are completed that ensure an explosive atmosphere is not present within the furnace.

168(4)  An employer must ensure that intakes, exhausts and the fire box of a furnace or fired heater are not located or operated in a Division 1, Zone 0 or  Zone 1 hazardous location of any Class as defined in the Canadian Electrical Code.

168(5)  An employer must ensure that a furnace or fired heater is not located or operated in a Division 2 or Zone 2 hazardous location of any Class as defined in the Canadian Electrical Code, unless

                                 (a)    the combustion process is totally enclosed except for the combustion air intake and the exhaust discharge,

                                 (b)    all surfaces exposed to the atmosphere

                                           (i)    operate below the temperature that would ignite a flammable substance present in the hazardous location, or

                                          (ii)    are shielded or blanketed in such a way as to prevent a flammable substance in the hazardous location from contacting the surface, and

                                 (c)    the combustion air intake and exhaust discharge are equipped with a flame arresting device or are located outside the hazardous location.

168(6)  If it is not reasonably practicable to comply with subsection 5(b), an employer must ensure that another effective safeguard is established.

Hot work

169(1)  Despite any other section in this Part, an employer must ensure that hot work is done in accordance with subsections (2) and (3) if

                                 (a)    the work area is a hazardous location, or

                                 (b)    the work area is not normally a hazardous location but an explosive atmosphere may exist for a limited time because

                                           (i)    a flammable substance is or may be in the atmosphere of the work area,

                                          (ii)    a flammable substance is or may be stored, handled, processed or used in the location,

                                         (iii)    the hot work is on or in an installation or item of equipment that contains a flammable substance or its residue, or

                                         (iv)    the hot work is on a vessel that contains residue that may release a flammable gas or vapour when exposed to heat.

169(2)  An employer must ensure that hot work is not begun until

                                 (a)    a hot work permit is issued that indicates

                                           (i)    the nature of the hazard,

                                          (ii)    the type and frequency of atmospheric testing required,

                                         (iii)    the safe work procedures and precautionary measures to be taken, and

                                         (iv)    the protective equipment required,

                                 (b)    the hot work location is

                                           (i)    cleared of combustible materials, or

                                          (ii)    suitably isolated from combustible materials,

                                 (c)    procedures are implemented to ensure continuous safe performance of the hot work, and

                                 (d)    testing shows that the atmosphere does not contain

                                           (i)    a flammable substance, in a mixture with air, in an amount exceeding 20 percent of that substance’s lower explosive limit for gas or vapours, or

                                          (ii)    the minimum ignitable concentration for dust.

169(3)  An employer must ensure that the tests referred to in subsection (2)(d) are repeated at regular intervals appropriate to the hazard associated with the work being performed.

Hot taps

170(1)  An employer must develop procedures in a hot tap plan specific to the type or class of hot tap work being performed before hot tap work begins.

170(2)  The employer must ensure that the plan includes

                                 (a)    a site hazard analysis,

                                 (b)    a description of the sequence of events,

                                 (c)    safety precautions to address the hazards, and

                                 (d)    an emergency response plan.

170(3)  The employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    only competent workers are permitted to carry out a hot tap operation,

                                 (b)    the point in the pressure‑containing barrier to be hot tapped is checked and strong enough for the hot tap to be done safely,

                                 (c)    adequate working space is available at the location of the hot tap,

                                 (d)    exit routes are available and their locations known by workers involved in the work,

                                 (e)    workers wear appropriate personal protective equipment when a hot tap is performed on equipment containing hydrocarbons, combustible fluids, superheated steam or any other hazardous material,

                                 (f)    material being supplied to the equipment being hot tapped can be shut off immediately in an emergency,

                                 (g)    the hot tap machine and fittings are of adequate design and capability for the process, conditions, pressure and temperature, and

                                 (h)    the pressure in the equipment being hot tapped is as low as practical during the hot tap operation.

170(4)  An employer must ensure, where reasonably practicable, that a hot tap is not undertaken if at the proposed hot tap location

                                 (a)    the equipment contains a harmful substance,

                                 (b)    the equipment is in hydrogen service, or

                                 (c)    the equipment contains an explosive mixture.

Spray operations

170.1(1)  An employer must ensure that a spray booth used to apply flammable substances is provided with ventilation in accordance with Part 26 and that the ventilation is

                                 (a)    adequate to remove flammable vapours, mists, or powders to a safe location, and

                                 (b)    interlocked with the spraying equipment so that the spraying equipment is made inoperable when the ventilation system is not in operation.

170.1(2)  An employer must ensure that a spray booth will not ignite a flammable substance.

170.1(3)  When spray application of a flammable substance is carried out other than in a spray booth, an employer must ensure that the application is carried out in accordance with the Alberta Fire Code (1997), and is

                                 (a)    carried out at least 6 metres away from anything that might obstruct ventilation, and

                                 (b)    effectively isolated from all machinery and equipment that is, or may become, a source of ignition and that is within 2 metres measured vertically above and 6 metres measured in other directions from the place at which the spray painting substance is being applied.

170.1(4)  If it is not reasonably practicable to ensure that the application is carried out as required by subsection (3)(a), an employer must ensure that the work area where the application is carried out is adequately ventilated to remove flammable vapours, mists or powders to a safe location.

170.1(5)  An employer must provide a nozzle guard for use with airless spray machinery.

170.1(6)  The worker operating airless spray machinery must ensure that the nozzle guard of airless spray machinery is in place at all times when the machinery is being operated.

Compressed and liquefied gas

171(1)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    compressed or liquefied gas containers are used, handled, stored and transported in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications,

                                 (b)    a cylinder of compressed flammable gas is not stored in the same room as a cylinder of compressed oxygen, unless the storage arrangements are in accordance with Part 3 of the Alberta Fire Code (1997),

                                 (c)    compressed or liquefied gas cylinders, piping and fittings are protected from damage during handling, filling, transportation and storage,

                                 (d)    compressed or liquefied gas cylinders are equipped with a valve protection cap if manufactured with a means of attachment, and

                                 (e)    oxygen cylinders or valves, regulators or other fittings of the oxygen‑using apparatus or oxygen distributing system are kept free of oil and grease.

171(2)  An employer must ensure that a compressed or liquefied gas system is not exposed to heat sources that generate temperatures that may

                                 (a)    result in the failure or explosion of the contents or the system, or

                                 (b)    exceed the maximum exposure temperatures specified by the manufacturer.

171(3)  An employer must ensure that a compressed or liquefied gas system is kept clean and free from oil, grease and other contaminants that may

                                 (a)    cause the system to fail, or

                                 (b)    burn or explode if they come in contact with the contents of the system.

171(4)  An employer must ensure that on each hose of an oxygen‑fuel system,

                                 (a)    a flashback device is installed at either the torch end or the regulator end, and

                                 (b)    a back‑flow prevention device is installed at the torch end.

171(5)  An employer must ensure that compressed or liquefied gas cylinders are  secured, preferably upright, and cannot fall or roll, unless a professional engineer certifies another method that protects against the hazards caused by dislodgment.

171(6)  Despite subsection (5), an employer must ensure that a cylinder containing acetylene is secured and stored upright.

171(7)  Moved to section 170.1(5).

171(8)  A worker must ensure that

                                 (a)    compressed gas equipment designed to be used with a specific gas is only used with that gas,

                                 (b)    the cylinder valve is shut off and pressure in the hose is released when cutting or welding is not in progress,

                                 (c)    sparks, flames or other sources of ignition are not allowed to come in contact with the cylinders, regulators or hoses of a compressed or liquefied gas system, and

                                 (d)    compressed air is not used to blow dust or other substances from clothing.

Welding — general

171.1(1)  An employer must comply with the requirements of CSA Standard W117.2‑06, Safety in welding, cutting and allied processes.

171.1(2)  An employer must ensure that welding or allied process equipment is erected, installed, assembled, started, operated, used, handled, stored, stopped, inspected, serviced, tested, cleaned, adjusted, carried, maintained, repaired and dismantled in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.

171.1(3)  An employer must ensure that, before a welding or allied process is commenced, the area surrounding the operation is inspected and

                                 (a)    all combustible, flammable or explosive material, dust, gas or vapour is removed, or

                                 (b)    alternate methods of rendering the area safe are implemented.

171.1(4)  If a welding or allied process is performed above an area where a worker may be present, an employer must ensure that adequate means are taken to protect a worker below the operation from sparks, debris and other falling hazards.

171.1(5)  An operator of an electric welding machine must not leave the machine unattended without removing the electrode.

171.1(6)  An employer must ensure that appropriate welding and ground leads are used to fasten the electric supply cable securely.

Gas welding or allied process

171.2(1)  An employer must ensure that a regulator and its flexible connecting hose are tested immediately after connection to a gas cylinder to ensure that there is no leak of the gas supply.

171.2(2)  An employer must ensure that if  a leak of the gas supply develops during gas welding or an allied process,

                                 (a)    the supply of gas is immediately shut off by the worker performing the welding or allied process, and

                                 (b)    the work is not resumed until the leak is repaired.

Welding Services From Vehicles

Storage compartments

172(1)  An employer must ensure that welding services provided from vehicles comply with CSA Standard W117.2‑01, Safety in welding, cutting and allied processes with the exception of Clause G.2 (Cabinets) of Annex G.

172(2)  An employer must ensure that gases do not accumulate and reach their lower explosive limit by providing solid‑walled storage compartments in which compressed gas cylinders are stored with vents

                                 (a)    that have a minimum of 0.18 square metresP P of free area for every 0.42 cubic metres of compartment volume,

                                 (b)    that have the free area split evenly between the top surface and the bottom surface of the storage compartment, and

                                 (c)    that are unobstructed under all conditions.

172(3)  An employer must ensure that solid‑walled storage compartments in which compressed gas cylinders are stored are built so that gases or vapours cannot flow into adjoining compartments.

172(4)  An employer must ensure that solid‑walled compartments in which compressed gas cylinders are stored use

                                 (a)    latching and locking hardware made of non‑sparking materials, and

                                 (b)    electrical components appropriate for use in an explosive atmosphere, if electrical components are located within the compartment.

172(5)  Subsections (1) to (4) apply whether the compressed gas cylinder is stored vertically, horizontally or at an angle.

Horizontal cylinder storage

173(1)  An employer must ensure that a compressed gas cylinder that is horizontal when it is transported or used in a vehicle

                                 (a)    is in a storage compartment that incorporates a structure of sufficient strength to prevent the cylinder from passing through it should the valve end of the cylinder be damaged and vent its contents in an uncontrolled manner,

                                 (b)    is in a storage compartment that incorporates a means of securing the cylinder that stops the cylinder from moving within the compartment and that puts the bottom of the cylinder in direct contact with the structure in clause (a), and

                                 (c)    is protected against scoring during insertion into, and removal from, the storage compartment.

173(2)  An employer must ensure that the regulator on a compressed gas cylinder that is horizontal when it is transported or used in a vehicle is protected from damage by other equipment in the storage compartment.

173(3)  An employer must ensure that a storage compartment on a vehicle from which welding services are provided is certified by a professional engineer as meeting the requirements of subsections (1) and (2).

Handling cylinders

174(1)  A worker must not insert or remove a compressed gas cylinder from a storage compartment by holding the valve or valve protection cap.

174(2)  A worker must put on and secure to the valve outlet the valve protection cap or plug provided by the manufacturer of a compressed gas cylinder if the cylinder is not secured and not connected to dispensing equipment.

174(3)  If a welding service vehicle is not in service for any reason, a worker must

                                 (a)    close the compressed gas cylinder valves,

                                 (b)    remove the regulators if they are not integral to the cylinders, and

                                 (c)    put on and secure the valve protection caps or plugs.

174(4)  A worker must shut off the cylinder valve and release the pressure in the hose if a compressed gas cylinder on a welding service vehicle is not in use or if the vehicle is left unattended.

Isolating Pipes and Pipelines

Isolating methods

175   Moved to section 215.4.

Pigging

176   Moved to section 215.5.

Part 11
First Aid

Training standards

177(1)  A person or agency that provides training in first aid must enter into an agreement with a Director of Medical Services if the person or agency is to provide training in first aid to workers under this Code.

177(2)  An approved training agency that provides the first aid training to candidates for a certificate in emergency first aid, standard first aid or advanced first aid must comply with the terms of the agreement with a Director of Medical Services.

177(3)  A worker who successfully completes the training of an approved training agency must meet the standards for a certificate in emergency first aid, standard first aid or advanced first aid that are adopted by a Director of Medical Services in consultation with the Joint First Aid Training Standards Board.

AR 87/2009 s177;56/2018

Providing services, supplies, equipment

178(1)  An employer must provide first aid services, supplies and equipment and provide a first aid room in accordance with the applicable requirements of Schedule 2, Tables 3 to 7 or an acceptance from a Director of Medical Services.

178(2)  A prime contractor must ensure that in accordance with the applicable requirements of Schedule 2, Tables 3 to 7, first aid services, supplies and equipment and a first aid room, are available at the work site suitable for the type of work site and the total number of workers at the work site.

178(3)  Despite subsections (1) and (2), the employers and prime contractor at a project may enter into a written agreement to collectively provide first aid services, supplies and equipment and provide a first aid room for workers in accordance with the applicable requirements of Schedule 2, Tables 3 to 7 or an acceptance as allowed by section 55 of the Act.

178(4)  If a first aid room is a temporary or mobile facility, an employer must ensure that it meets the requirements of Schedule 2, Table 4 except that

                                 (a)    the room may be used for other services if it is maintained appropriately to provide first aid, and

                                 (b)    where it is not possible or practicable to provide a supply of hot and cold potable water, a supply of cold potable water is acceptable.

AR 87/2009 s178;56/2018

Location of first aid

179   An employer and prime contractor must

                                 (a)    ensure that first aid services, first aid equipment, supplies and the first aid room required by this Code are

                                           (i)    located at or near the work site they are intended to serve, and

                                          (ii)    available and accessible during all working hours;

                                 (b)    ensure that first aid equipment and supplies are

                                           (i)    maintained in a clean, dry and serviceable condition,

                                          (ii)    contained in a material that protects the contents from the environment, and

                                         (iii)    clearly identified as first aid equipment and supplies;

                                 (c)    post, at conspicuous places at the work site, signs indicating the location of first aid services, equipment and supplies or, if posting of signs is not practicable, ensure that each worker knows the location of first aid services, equipment and supplies, and

                                 (d)    ensure that an emergency communication system is in place for workers to summon first aid services.

Emergency transportation

180(1)  Before workers are sent to a work site, the employer must ensure that arrangements are in place to transport injured or ill workers from the work site to the nearest health care facility.

180(2)  An employer must ensure that an ambulance service licensed in accordance with the Ambulance Services Act is readily available to the work site when travel conditions are normal.

180(3)  If an ambulance service licensed in accordance with the Ambulance Services Act is not readily available to the work site, or if travel conditions are not normal, an employer must ensure that other transportation is available that

                                 (a)    is suitable, considering the distance to be travelled and the types of acute illnesses or injuries that may occur at the work site,

                                 (b)    protects occupants from the weather,

                                 (c)    has systems that allow the occupants to communicate with the health care facility to which the injured or ill worker is being taken, and

                                 (d)    can accommodate a stretcher and an accompanying person if required to.

180(4)  An employer must provide a means of communication at the work site to summon an ambulance service licensed in accordance with the Ambulance Services Act or transportation described in subsection (3).

180(5)  If a worker is acutely ill or injured or needs to be accompanied during transport to a health care facility, an employer must ensure that the worker is accompanied by at least one first aider, in addition to the operator of the transportation.

180(6)  Subsection (5) does not apply if there are three or fewer workers at the work site at the time.

First aid providers

181(1)  An employer must ensure that the number of first aiders at a work site and their qualifications and training comply with Schedule 2, Tables 5, 6 or 7.

181(2)  An employer must ensure that the first aiders at a work site have successfully completed a first aid training course approved by a Director of Medical Services and hold a valid certificate in first aid.

181(3)  If a nurse, advanced first aider, or ACP is required at a work site, that person must

                                 (a)    be based at or near the first aid room, and

                                 (b)    when not in the first aid room, be easy to contact or notify if first aid services are required.

181(4)  If a nurse, advanced first aider or ACP while on duty at the work site, is required to perform non‑first aid duties, such duties must be of a type that let the person remain in a fit and clean condition.

181(5)  Subsection (4) does not apply if the duties are those of a first aid provider.

181(6)  An employer must keep a record of workers at a work site who are first aiders.

AR 87/2009 s181;56/2018

Duty to report injury or illness

182   If a worker has an acute illness or injury at the work site, the worker must report the illness or injury to the employer as soon as is practicable.

Record of injury or illness

183(1)  An employer must record every acute illness or injury that occurs at the work site in a record kept for the purpose as soon as is practicable after the illness or injury is reported to the employer.

183(2)  A record under subsection (1) must include the following:

                                 (a)    the name of the worker;

                                 (b)    the name and qualifications of the person giving first aid;

                                 (c)    a description of the illness or injury;

                                 (d)    the first aid given to the worker;

                                 (e)    the date and time of the illness or injury;

                                 (f)    the date and time the illness or injury was reported;

                                 (g)    where at the work site the incident occurred;

                                 (h)    the work‑related cause of the incident, if any.

183(3)  The employer must retain the records kept under this section for three years from the date the incident is recorded.

First aid records access

184(1)  This section applies to records of first aid given to a worker.

184(2)  Subject to section 51 of the Act, a person who has custody of records must ensure that no person other than the worker has access to a worker’s records unless

                                 (a)    the record is in a form that does not identify the worker,

                                 (b)    the worker has given written permission to the person, or

                                 (c)    access, use and disclosure of the information is in accordance with an enactment of Alberta or Canada that authorizes or requires the disclosure.

184(3)  An employer must give a worker a copy of the records pertaining to the worker if the worker asks for a copy.

AR 87/2009 s184;56/2018

Part 12
General Safety Precautions

Housekeeping

185   An employer must ensure that a work site is kept clean and free from materials or equipment that could cause workers to slip or trip.

Lighting

186(1)  An employer must ensure that lighting at a work site is sufficient to enable work to be done safely.

186(2)  An employer must ensure that a light source above a working or walking surface is protected against damage.

186(3)  An employer must ensure that there is emergency lighting at a work site if workers are in danger if the normal lighting system fails.

186(4)  Emergency lighting must generate enough light so that workers can

                                 (a)    leave the work site safely,

                                 (b)    start the necessary emergency shut‑down procedures, and

                                 (c)    restore normal lighting.

Pallets and storage racks

187(1)  An employer must ensure that pallets used to transport or store materials or containers are loaded, moved, stacked, arranged and stored in a manner that does not create a danger to workers.

187(2)  An employer must ensure that racks used to store materials or equipment

                                 (a)    are designed, constructed and maintained to support the load placed on them, and

                                 (b)    are placed on firm foundations that can support the load.

187(3)  A worker must report any damage to a storage rack to an employer as quickly as is practicable.

187(4)  The employer and the workers at a work site must take all reasonable steps to prevent storage racks from being damaged to the extent that their integrity as structures is compromised.

Placement of roofing materials

187.1(1)  An employer must ensure that supplies and roofing materials stored on the roof of a residential building under construction are located not less than 2 metres from a roof edge.

187.1(2)  An employer must ensure that the weight of supplies and roofing materials referred to in subsection (1) is uniformly distributed.

Restraining hoses and piping

188(1)  An employer must ensure that a hose or piping and its connections operating under pressure are restrained if workers could be injured by its movement if it fails or if it is disconnected.

188(2)  Despite subsection (1), if a hose or piping and its connections operating at a working pressure of 2000 kilopascals or more cannot be restrained, in order to prevent a failure that could injure workers, an employer must ensure that the hose or piping and its connections are designed, installed, used, inspected and maintained

                                 (a)    in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, or

                                 (b)    in accordance with specifications certified by a professional engineer.

188(3)  Subsection (1) does not apply to properly maintained fire hoses used by competent workers.

Securing equipment and materials

189   If a worker may be injured if equipment or material is dislodged, moved, spilled or damaged, both the employer and the worker must take all reasonable steps to ensure the equipment or material is contained, restrained or protected to eliminate the potential danger.

Skeleton structures

190(1)  An employer must ensure that the erection drawings and procedures for a project that includes connecting the structural parts of a skeleton structure are prepared and certified by a professional engineer.

190(2)  The erection drawings and procedures referred to in subsection (1) must

                                 (a)    show the sequence in which the structure is to be erected,

                                 (b)    show the horizontal and vertical placement of base structures and footings, and

                                 (c)    ensure that the structure is stable during assembly.

190(3)  If the erection procedures referred to in subsection (1) must be changed because of site conditions or unanticipated loads on the skeleton structure, the employer must ensure that the changed, additional or alternative procedures are prepared and certified by a professional engineer before they are implemented.

190(4)  An employer must ensure that a competent worker at a work site where a skeleton structure is being erected

                                 (a)    coordinates the operation until the structure is permanently stabilized, and

                                 (b)    directs the removal of the temporary supporting structures.

Signallers

191(1)  If this Code requires signals to be given by a designated signaller, an employer must designate a competent worker to give the signals.

191(2)  An employer must ensure that, if the designated signaller uses hand signals, the signaller wears a highly visible vest, armlet or other piece of clothing that clearly identifies the worker as a designated signaller.

191(3)  A designated signaller using hand signals must wear the vest, armlet or other piece of clothing required by the employer under subsection (2).

191(4)  Before giving a signal to proceed, a designated signaller must ensure that there are no hazards in the vicinity.

191(5)  If a signaller is designated, an equipment operator must take signals only from the designated signaller.

191(6)  An employer must ensure that only one designated signaller at a time gives signals to an equipment operator.

191(7)  Despite subsections (5) and (6), an equipment operator must take a “STOP” signal from a worker who is not a designated signaller.

191(8)  Despite subsections (5) and (6), if signals cannot be transmitted properly between a designated signaller and an equipment operator, an employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    additional designated signallers are available to transmit signals, or

                                 (b)    a means of ensuring clear and complete communication other than using designated signallers is provided.

Stabilizing masonry walls

192   An employer must ensure that temporary supporting structures

                                 (a)    are used to stabilize a masonry wall that is more than 2 metres high during its erection, and

                                 (b)    are not removed until the wall is permanently stabilized.

Tire servicing

193(1)  An employer must ensure that a competent worker services, inspects, disassembles and reassembles a tire or tire and wheel assembly in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.

193(2)  An employer must ensure that the manufacturer’s service manuals for tires and wheels serviced by the employer are readily available to workers.

193(3)  An employer must ensure that a competent worker inflates a tire mounted on a split‑rim or locking ring wheel only if

                                 (a)    the wheel assembly is in a tire cage or is similarly restrained, and

                                 (b)    flying parts from split‑rim or locking ring failure or tire rupture can be contained.

193(4)  An employer must ensure that a worker uses a clamp‑on type of connector to inflate split rim and locking ring wheels.

193(5)  If a clamp‑on type of connector is used to inflate a tire, the employer must ensure that the worker

                                 (a)    uses an in‑line pressure gauge and positive pressure control, and

                                 (b)    inflates the tire from a safe position out of the immediate danger area.

193(6)  A person must not inflate a tire with a clamp‑on type of connector unless the person is in a safe position and out of the immediate danger area.

Vehicle traffic control

194(1)  If vehicle traffic at a work site is dangerous to workers on foot, in vehicles or on equipment, an employer must ensure that the traffic is controlled to protect the workers.

194(2)  An employer must ensure that a worker on foot and exposed to traffic wears a highly visible piece of clothing.

194(3)  A worker on foot and exposed to traffic must wear a highly visible piece of clothing.

194(4)  If a worker is designated by an employer to control traffic, the employer must ensure that the designated traffic controller wears a highly visible piece of clothing that

                                 (a)    clearly identifies the worker as a designated traffic controller, and

                                 (b)    is retroreflective if the worker is controlling traffic in the dark or visibility is poor.

194(5)  A worker designated to control traffic must wear a highly visible piece of clothing that complies with subsection (4).

194(6)  If a worker is designated by an employer to control traffic, the employer must ensure that the designated traffic controller uses a handheld signal light if it is dark or visibility is poor.

194(7)  If traffic on a public highway is dangerous to workers, an employer must protect the workers from the traffic using

                                 (a)    warning signs,

                                 (b)    barriers,

                                 (c)    lane control devices,

                                 (d)    flashing lights,

                                 (e)    flares,

                                 (f)    conspicuously identified pilot vehicles,

                                 (g)    automatic or remote‑controlled traffic control systems,

                                 (h)    designated persons directing traffic, or

                                  (i)    methods described in the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Canada (1998), and its updates, published up to and including June 30, 2009 by the Transportation Association of Canada.

Working on ice

195(1)  If a worker is to work on ice and the water beneath the ice is more than 1 metre deep at any point, an employer must ensure the ice will support the load to be placed on it.

195(2)  The employer must test the ice for the purposes of subsection (1)

                                 (a)    before work begins, and

                                 (b)    as often during the work as necessary to ensure the safety of the workers.

Part 13
Joint Work Site Health and Safety
Committee
s and Health and
Safety Representatives

Application of this Part

196   This Part applies to a work site that is required to have a joint work site health and safety committee under section 16 of the Act or a health and safety representative under section 17 of the Act.

AR 56/2018 s17

Terms of reference

197   Each joint work site health and safety committee must establish terms of reference

                                 (a)    that ensure, to the extent practicable and subject to section 22(1) of the Act, that the committee’s membership provides appropriate representation of all relevant occupational health and safety concerns at the work sites that the committee relates to,

                                 (b)    that establish a process for replacing a member of the committee during the member’s term of office,

                                 (c)    that establish a dispute resolution process to be used in cases where the committee has failed to reach consensus about making a recommendation under section 19(f) of the Act, and

                                 (d)    that establish a process for coordinating with other joint work site health and safety committees established by the same employer or prime contractor, if there is one.

AR 56/2018 s17

Additional duties of a joint work site
health and safety committee

198   A joint work site health and safety committee must inspect each work site at least once before each quarterly meeting required by section 27(1) of the Act, to identify health and safety hazards that have not been controlled.

AR 56/2018 s17

Disclosure of personal information

199   A joint work site health and safety committee, its individual members, or a health and safety representative, must not disclose a worker’s personal health information or the personal information of an identifiable individual unless the disclosure is required by law.

AR 56/2018 s17

Duties of employers, contractors and prime contractors

200(1)  The employer, contractor and prime contractor, if there is one, must

                                 (a)    consult and cooperate with all joint work site health and safety committees and all health and safety representatives for their work sites to develop policies, procedures and codes of practice required by the Act, regulations and this Code,

                                 (b)    provide members of all joint work site health and safety committees and all health and safety representatives for their work sites with reasonable opportunity to inform workers on matters affecting occupational health and safety,

                                 (c)    ensure that members of all joint work site health and safety committees and all health and safety representatives for their work sites are allowed to examine records, policies, plans, procedures, codes of practice, reports or manufacturer specifications that must be maintained under the Act, regulations and this Code, and

                                 (d)    distribute to all joint work site health and safety committees and all health and safety representatives for their work sites any information or documents addressed to the committee or representative as soon as reasonably practicable after the information or document is received by the employer, contractor or prime contractor, if there is one.

200(2)  Subsection (1)(d) does not apply to a report referred to in section 36 of the Act.

AR 56/2018 s17

Training standards

201   For the purposes of providing training to co-chairs and members of a joint work site health and safety committee and to health and safety representatives under section 29(1) and (2) of the Act, the employer or prime contractor, if there is one, must use an organization designated by the Minister under section 83 of the Act to provide the required training.

AR 56/2018 s17

Inspection of work site with officer

202(1)  An officer conducting an inspection at a work site shall, where feasible, request the co-chair who represents the workers on the joint work site health and safety committee, or the co‑chair’s designate, or a health and safety representative, as applicable, to be present at the inspection.

202(2)  Where, under subsection (1), an officer requests the co-chair who represents the workers on the joint work site health and safety committee, or the co‑chair’s designate, or a health and safety representative to be present at an inspection, the employer must provide that person with time away to attend the inspection.

AR 56/2018 s17

203 ‑ 207   Repealed AR 56/2018 s17.

Part 14
Lifting and Handling Loads

Equipment

208(1)  An employer must provide, where reasonably practicable, appropriate equipment for lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling, carrying, handling or transporting heavy or awkward loads.

208(2)  An employer must ensure that workers use the equipment provided under subsection (1).

208(3)  Workers must use the equipment provided for lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling, carrying, handling or transporting heavy or awkward loads.

208(4)  For the purposes of this section, a heavy or awkward load includes equipment, goods, supplies, persons and animals.

Adapting heavy or awkward loads

209   If the equipment provided under section 208 is not reasonably practicable in a particular circumstance or for a particular heavy or awkward load, the employer must take all practicable means to

                                 (a)    adapt the load to facilitate lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling, carrying, handling or transporting the load without injuring workers, or

                                 (b)    otherwise minimize the manual handling required to move the load.

Work site design — health care facilities

209.1(1)  An employer must ensure that appropriate patient/client/resident handling equipment is adequately incorporated into the design and construction of

                                 (a)    a new health care facility, and

                                 (b)    a health care facility undergoing significant physical alterations, renovations or repairs.

209.1(2)  An employer must ensure that any new patient/client/resident handling equipment installed at an existing work site, including vehicles in which patient/client/resident handling occurs, fits adequately in the space intended for it.

209.1(3)  Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply to health care facility construction, alterations, renovations or repairs started before July 1, 2009.

Patient/client/resident handling

209.2(1)  An employer must develop and implement a safe patient/client/resident handling program if workers are required to lift, transfer or reposition patients/clients/residents.

209.2(2)  The program required by subsection (1) must include an annual evaluation of its effectiveness at preventing worker injuries.

209.2(3)  An employer must ensure that workers follow the safe handling program required by subsection (1).

209.2(4)  Workers must follow the safe handling program required by subsection (1).

Assessing manual handling hazards

210(1)  Before a worker manually lifts, lowers, pushes, pulls, carries, handles or transports a load that could injure the worker, an employer must perform a hazard assessment that considers

                                 (a)    the weight of the load,

                                 (b)    the size of the load,

                                 (c)    the shape of the load,

                                 (d)    the number of times the load will be moved, and

                                 (e)    the manner in which the load will be moved.

210(2)  Before a worker performs any manual patient/client/resident handling activities, an employer must perform a hazard assessment that considers the worker’s physical and mental capabilities to perform the work.

210(3)  If the hazard assessment required by section 7 and subsections (1) and (2) determines that there is a potential for musculoskeletal injury, an employer must ensure that all reasonably practicable measures are used to eliminate or reduce that potential in accordance with section 9.

Musculoskeletal injuries

211   If a worker reports to the employer what the worker believes to be work related symptoms of a musculoskeletal injury, the employer must promptly

                                 (a)    review the activities of that worker, and of other workers doing similar tasks, to identify work‑related causes of the symptoms, if any, and

                                 (b)    take corrective measures to avoid further injuries if the causes of the symptoms are work related.

Training to prevent musculoskeletal injury

211.1(1)  An employer must ensure that a worker who may be exposed to the possibility of musculoskeletal injury is trained in specific  measures to eliminate or reduce that possibility.

211.1(2)  An employer must ensure that the training referred to in subsection (1) includes

                                 (a)    identification of factors that could lead to a musculoskeletal injury,

                                 (b)    the early signs and symptoms of musculoskeletal injury and their potential health effects, and

                                 (c)    preventive measures including, where applicable, the use of altered work procedures, mechanical aids and personal protective equipment.

Part 15
Managing the Control
of Hazardous Energy

Isolation

212(1)  If machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment is to be serviced, repaired, tested, adjusted or inspected, an employer must ensure that no worker performs such work on the machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment until it has come to a complete stop and

                                 (a)    all hazardous energy at the location at which the work is to be carried out is isolated by activation of an energy‑isolating device and the energy–isolating device is secured in accordance with section 214, 215, or 215.1 as designated by the employer, or

                                 (b)    the machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment is otherwise rendered inoperative in a manner that prevents its accidental activation and provides equal or greater protection than the protection afforded under (a).

212(2)  An employer must develop and implement procedures and controls that ensure the machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment is serviced, repaired, tested, adjusted or inspected safely if

                                 (a)    the manufacturer’s specifications require the machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment to remain operative while it is being  serviced, repaired, tested, adjusted, or inspected, or

                                 (b)    there are no manufacturer’s specifications and it is not reasonably practicable to stop or render the machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment inoperative.

212(3)  If piping, a pipeline or a process system containing a harmful substance under pressure is to be serviced, repaired, tested, adjusted or inspected, an employer must ensure that no worker performs such work on the piping, pipeline or process system until flow in the piping, pipeline or process system has been stopped or regulated to a safe level, and the location at which the work is to be carried out is isolated and secured in accordance with section 215.4.

Verifying isolation

213   A worker must not perform work on machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment to be serviced, repaired, tested, adjusted or inspected until

                                 (a)    the actions required by subsection 212(1) are completed,

                                 (b)    the machinery, equipment, or powered mobile equipment is tested to verify that it is inoperative, and

                                 (c)    the worker is satisfied that it is inoperative.

Securing Isolation

Securing by individual workers

214(1)  Once all energy‑isolating devices have been activated to control hazardous energy in accordance with section 212(1), an employer must ensure that a worker involved in work at each location requiring control of hazardous energy secures each energy‑isolating device with a personal lock.

214(2)  Once each energy‑isolating device is secured as required by subsection (1), the worker must verify that the hazardous energy source has been effectively isolated.

214(3)  If more than one worker is working at each location requiring hazardous energy to be controlled,

                                 (a)    each worker must attach a personal lock to each energy‑isolating device, and

                                 (b)    the first worker applying a lock must verify that the hazardous energy source has been effectively isolated.

214(4)  If a worker who has placed a personal lock is reassigned before the work is completed, or the work is extended from one shift to another, an employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    another worker, authorized by the employer to do so, attaches a personal lock to the energy‑isolating device prior to removal of the reassigned or departing worker’s lock, or

                                 (b)    there is an effective and orderly transfer of control of the reassigned or departing worker’s lock.

214(5)  An employer must ensure that each personal lock used has a unique mark or identification tag on it to identify it as belonging to the worker to whom it is assigned.

214(6)  An employer must ensure that the name of the worker to whom a personal lock or identification tag is assigned is readily available during the time a hazardous energy source is isolated.

214(7)  Upon completing the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy, an employer must ensure that the machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment is returned to operation in accordance with section 215.3.

Securing by a group

215(1)  If a large number of workers is working on machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment, or a number of energy‑isolating devices must be secured, an employer may use a group procedure in accordance with subsections (2) through (6).

215(2)  An employer must ensure that the group procedure referred to in subsection (1) is readily available to workers at the work site where the group procedure is used.

215(3)  Once all required energy‑isolating devices have been activated in accordance with section 212(1) by a worker designated by the employer, an employer must ensure that a designated worker has

                                 (a)    secured all energy‑isolating devices,

                                 (b)    secured any keys for the devices used under clause (a) to a key securing system such as a lock box,

                                 (c)    completed, signed and posted a checklist that identifies the machinery or equipment covered by the hazardous energy control procedure, and

                                 (d)    verified and documented that all sources of hazardous energy are effectively isolated.

215(4)  Each worker working at each location requiring control of hazardous energy must apply a personal lock to the key securing system referred to in subsection (3)(b) before working on the machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment.

215(5)  If a worker who has placed a personal lock is reassigned before the work is completed, or the work is extended from one shift to another, an employer must ensure that there is an effective and orderly transfer of control of the reassigned or departing worker’s personal lock.

215(6)  Upon completing the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy, a worker referred to in subsection (4) must remove his or her personal lock from the key securing system.

215(7)  Upon completing the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy, an employer must ensure that the machinery, equipment, or powered mobile equipment is returned to operation in accordance with section 215.3.

Securing by complex group control

215.1(1)  Repealed AR 56/2018 s18.

215.1(2)  Prior to initiating a complex group control process, an employer must complete a hazard assessment to identify the type and location of hazardous energy sources.

215.1(3)  If using a complex group control process, an employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    procedures are implemented to ensure continuous safe performance of the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy,

                                 (b)    a work permit or master tag procedure is implemented so that

                                           (i)    each involved worker personally signs on the job before commencing the work and signs off the job upon completing the work, or

                                          (ii)    a crew leader signs on and off the job for a crew or team of workers,

                                 (c)    a worker designated by the employer

                                           (i)    has activated all required energy‑isolating devices to control hazardous energy in accordance with section 212(1), and

                                          (ii)    has secured the energy‑isolating devices, and

                                 (d)    another worker designated by the employer has verified that all sources of hazardous energy are effectively isolated.

215.1(4)  If a complex group control process is being used and provided that the isolation point is reasonably accessible and isolation is required for the work being undertaken by the worker, each involved worker may place personal locks on the energy‑isolating devices and verify effective isolation.

215.1(5)  Upon completing the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy, an employer must ensure that the machinery, equipment, piping, pipeline or process system is returned to operation in accordance with section 215.3.

AR 87/2009;56/2018

Securing remotely controlled systems

215.2(1)  If securing an energy‑isolating device as required by section 212(1) is not reasonably practicable on a system that remotely controls the operation of machinery, equipment, piping, a pipeline or a process system, an employer must ensure that control system isolating devices and the procedures for applying and securing them provide equal or greater protection than the protection afforded under section 212(1)(a).

215.2(2)  Upon completing the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy, an employer must ensure that the system is returned to operation in accordance with section 215.3.

Returning to operation

215.3(1)  A person must not remove a personal lock or other securing device unless

                                 (a)    the person is the worker who installed it,

                                 (b)    the person is the designated worker under section 215(3) or section 215.1(3)(c), or

                                 (c)    the person is acting in accordance with the procedures required under section 215.2

215.3(2)  Despite subsection (1), in an emergency or if the worker who installed a lock or other securing device is not available, a worker designated by the employer may remove the lock or other securing device in accordance with a procedure that includes verifying that no worker will be in danger due to the removal.

215.3(3)  An employer must ensure that securing devices are not removed until

                                 (a)    each involved worker is accounted for,

                                 (b)    any personal locks placed by workers under sections 214, 215(4) or 215.1(4) are removed,

                                 (c)    procedures are implemented to verify that no worker is in danger before a worker under section 214(1), designated under section 215(3), designated under section 215.1(3)(c), or in accordance with procedures under section 215.2 removes the securing devices and the machinery, equipment, powered mobile equipment, piping, pipeline or process system is returned to operation.

215.3(4)  An employer must ensure that each involved worker follows the procedures under subsection (3)(c).

Piping and Pigging

Isolating piping

215.4(1)  To isolate piping or a pipeline containing harmful substances under pressure, an employer may use

                                 (a)    a system of blanking or blinding, or

                                 (b)    a double block and bleed isolation system providing

                                           (i)    two blocking seals on either side of the isolation point, and

                                          (ii)    an operable bleed‑off between the two seals.

215.4(2)  An employer must ensure that piping that is blanked or blinded is clearly marked to indicate that a blank or blind is installed.

215.4(3)  An employer must ensure that, if valves or similar blocking seals with a bleed‑off valve between them are used to isolate piping, the bleed‑off valve is secured in the “OPEN” position and the valves or similar blocking seals in the flow lines are functional and secured in the “CLOSED” position.

215.4(4)  An employer must ensure that the device used to secure the valves or seals described in subsection (3) is

                                 (a)    a positive mechanical means of keeping the valves or seals in the required position, and

                                 (b)    strong enough and designed to withstand inadvertent opening without the use of excessive force, unusual measures or destructive techniques.

215.4(5)  If it is not reasonably practicable to provide blanking, blinding or double block and bleed isolation, an employer must ensure that an alternate means of isolation that provides adequate protection to workers, certified as appropriate and safe by a professional engineer, is implemented.

Pigging and testing of pipelines

215.5(1)  A person who is not directly involved in a pigging and testing operation must not be in the immediate area of piping exposed during the operation.

215.5(2)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a pigcatcher on a pipeline is isolated from the pipeline and depressurized before the pig is removed, and

                                 (b)    there are no workers at the end of the pipe or in the immediate vicinity of the pigcatcher if the pipe or pigcatcher is under pressure during the operation.

Part 16
Noise Exposure

Duty to reduce

216   An employer must ensure that all reasonably practicable measures are used to reduce the noise to which workers are exposed in areas of the work site where workers may be present.

Noise control design

217(1)  An employer must ensure that the following are designed and constructed in such a way that the continuous noise levels generated are not more than 85 dBA or are as low as reasonably practicable:

                                 (a)    a new work site;

                                 (b)    significant physical alterations, renovations or repairs to an existing work site or work area;

                                 (c)    a work process introduced to the work site or work area;

                                 (d)    significant equipment introduced to the work site or work area.

217(2)  Subsection (1) does not apply to alterations, renovations or repairs begun or work processes or equipment introduced before April 30, 2004.

217(3)  In the case of a farming and ranching operation, subsection (1) does not apply to alterations, renovations or repairs begun or work processes or equipment introduced before December 1, 2018.

AR 87/2009 s217;152/2018

Worker exposure to noise

218   An employer must ensure that a worker’s exposure to noise does not exceed

                                 (a)    the noise exposure limits in Schedule 3, Table 1, and

                                 (b)    85 dBA LBexB.

Noise exposure assessment

219(1)  If workers are, or may be, exposed to noise at a work site in excess of 85 dBA LBexB and the noise exposure limits in Schedule 3, Table 1, an employer must do a noise exposure assessment under section 7.

219(2)  A person who assesses noise exposure at a work site must measure the noise in accordance with CSA Standard Z107.56‑06, Procedures for the Measurement of Occupational Noise Exposure.

219(3)  A person who measures noise exposure at a work site must use

                                 (a)    a sound level meter meeting the requirements for a Type 2 instrument as specified by ANSI Standard S1.4‑1983 (R2006), Specification for Sound Level Meters,

                                 (b)    a noise dosimeter meeting the requirements for a Type 2 instrument as specified by ANSI Standard S1.25‑1991 (R1997), Specification for Personal Noise Dosimeters, and set at

                                           (i)    a criterion level of 85 dBA with a 3 dB exchange rate,

                                          (ii)    a threshold level at or below 80 dBA or “off”, and

                                         (iii)    slow response, or

                                 (c)    an integrating sound level meter meeting the requirements as specified by ANSI Standard S1.43‑1997, Specifications for Integrating‑Averaging Sound Level Meters, or IEC Standard 61672‑1 (2002), Electroacoustics – Sound Level Meters – Part 1: Specifications and IEC Standard 61672‑2 (2003), Electroacoustics – Sound Level Meters – Part 2: Pattern evaluation tests.

                                 (d)    repealed AR 56/2018 s19.

219(4)  An employer must ensure that a noise exposure assessment is

                                 (a)    conducted and interpreted by a competent person, and

                                 (b)    updated if a change in equipment or process affects the noise level or the length of time a worker is exposed to noise.

AR 87/2009 s219;56/2018

Results recorded

220(1)  An employer must ensure that results of noise exposure measurements are recorded and include

                                 (a)    the dates of measurements,

                                 (b)    the workers or occupations evaluated,

                                 (c)    the type of measuring equipment used,

                                 (d)    the sound level readings measured, and

                                 (e)    the work location evaluated.

220(2)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a copy of the results of the noise exposure assessment is available on request to an affected worker or an officer, and

                                 (b)    the record of the noise exposure assessment is retained for as long as the employer operates in Alberta.

Noise management program

221(1)  If a noise exposure assessment confirms that workers are exposed to excess noise at a work site, the employer must develop and implement a noise management program that includes policies and procedures.

221(2)  The employer must ensure that the noise management program includes the following:

                                 (a)    a plan to educate workers in the hazards of exposure to excess noise and to train workers in the correct use of control measures and hearing protection;

                                 (b)    the methods and procedures to be used when measuring or monitoring worker exposure to noise;

                                 (c)    the posting of suitable warning signs in any work area where the noise level exceeds 85 dBA;

                                 (d)    the methods of noise control to be used;

                                 (e)    the selection, use and maintenance of hearing protection devices to be worn by workers;

                                 (f)    the requirements for audiometric testing and the maintenance of test records;

                                 (g)    an annual review of the policies and procedures to address

                                           (i)    the effectiveness of the education and training plan,

                                          (ii)    the need for further noise measurement, and

                                         (iii)    the adequacy of noise control measures.

221(3)  A worker who is subject to noise management must cooperate with the employer in implementing the policies and procedures.

Hearing protection

222(1)  An employer must ensure that hearing protection equipment provided to workers exposed to excess noise

                                 (a)    meets the requirements of CSA Standard Z94.2‑02, Hearing Protection Devices — Performance, Selection, Care, and Use, and

                                 (b)    is of the appropriate class and grade as described in Schedule 3, Table 2.

222(2)  An employer must

                                 (a)    provide workers with training in the selection, use and maintenance of hearing protection equipment required to be used at a work site in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, and

                                 (b)    ensure that affected workers wear the required hearing protection equipment.

222(3)  Workers who are provided with hearing protection equipment must wear and use the equipment in accordance with the training provided by the employer.

Audiometric testing

223(1)  An employer must provide, at the employer’s expense, the following audiometric tests for a worker exposed to excess noise:

                                 (a)    an initial baseline test as soon as is practicable, but not later than six months after the worker is employed or within six  months after a worker is exposed to excess noise because of a change in the worker’s duties or process conditions,

                                 (b)    not more than 12 months after the initial baseline test, and

                                 (c)    at least every second year after the test under clause (b).

223(2)  An employer must ensure that audiometric tests are administered by an audiometric technician who must

                                 (a)    work in consultation with a physician, audiologist or occupational health nurse designated by the employer,

                                 (b)    maintain a log book for each audiometer being used that

                                           (i)    contains the audiometer’s written calibration records, and

                                          (ii)    remains with the audiometer throughout its useful lifetime,

                                 (c)    conduct the tests in a location where background noise levels do not exceed those specified in Schedule 3, Table 3,

                                 (d)    record the results of the audiometric tests,

                                 (e)    provide a copy of the test results to the worker,

                                 (f)    retain the records of the audiometric tests for a period of not less than 10 years, and

                                 (g)    ensure that the medical history information is under the sole control of the person designated under subsection (2)(a).

223(3)  If the results of an audiometric test indicate an abnormal audiogram or show an abnormal shift, the audiometric technician must

                                 (a)    advise the worker of the test results,

                                 (b)    request the worker to provide, and the worker must provide, relevant medical history, and

                                 (c)    forward the results that indicate an abnormal audiogram or an abnormal shift, the medical history and the baseline audiogram to a physician or audiologist designated by the employer to receive this information.

223(4)  If the physician or audiologist designated by the employer confirms the audiogram as abnormal or the occurrence of the abnormal shift, the physician or audiologist must

                                 (a)    advise the worker to that effect within 30 days,

                                 (b)    with the written consent of the worker, provide results of the audiometric tests to the worker’s physician,

                                 (c)    advise the employer as to the effectiveness of the noise management program in place at the work site, and

                                 (d)    retain the records of the audiometric  test for a period of not less than 10 years.

223(5)  A person must not release records of audiometric tests conducted on a worker or medical history received from a worker as required by this section to any person without the worker’s written permission except in accordance with this section.

Credit of time

224   If it is not reasonably practicable for a worker to undergo audiometric testing during the worker’s normal working hours, the employer must

                                 (a)    credit the time the worker spends to get the test done as time at work, and

                                 (b)    ensure that the worker does not lose any pay or other benefits because the worker was tested.

Part 17
Overhead Power Lines

Safe limit of approach distances

225(1)  An employer must contact the power line operator before work is done or equipment is operated within 7.0 metres of an energized overhead power line

                                 (a)    to determine the voltage of the power line, and

                                 (b)    to establish the appropriate safe limit of approach distance listed in Schedule 4.

225(1.1)  Except as provided for in subsection (2), an employer must ensure that the safe limit of approach distance, as established in subsection (1), is maintained and that no work is done and no equipment is operated at distances less than the established safe limit of approach distance.

225(2)  An employer must notify the operator of an energized overhead power line before work is done or equipment is operated in the vicinity of the power line at distances less than the safe limit of approach distances listed in Schedule 4, and obtain the operator’s assistance in protecting workers involved.

225(3)  An employer must ensure that earth or other materials are not placed under or beside an overhead power line if doing so reduces the safe clearance to less than the safe limit of approach distances listed in Schedule 4.

225(4)  A worker must follow the direction of the employer in maintaining the appropriate safe clearance when working in the vicinity of an overhead power line.

Transported loads, equipment and buildings

226   The safe limit of approach distances listed in Schedule 4 do not apply to a load, equipment or building that is transported under energized overhead power lines if the total height, including equipment transporting it, is less than 4.15 metres.

Utility worker and tree trimmer exemption

227   Section 225 does not apply to utility workers, qualified utility workers or utility tree trimmers working in accordance with the requirements of the Alberta Electrical and Communication Utility Code (2002).

Part 18
Personal Protective Equipment

Duty to use personal protective equipment

228(1)  If the hazard assessment indicates the need for personal protective equipment, an employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    workers wear personal protective equipment that is correct for the hazard and protects workers,

                                 (b)    workers properly use and wear the personal protective equipment,

                                 (c)    the personal protective equipment is in a condition to perform the function for which it was designed, and

                                 (d)    workers are trained in the correct use, care, limitations and assigned maintenance of the personal protective equipment.

228(2)  A worker must

                                 (a)    use and wear properly the appropriate personal protective equipment specified in this Code in accordance with the training and instruction received,

                                 (b)    inspect the personal protective equipment before using it, and

                                 (c)    not use personal protective equipment that is unable to perform the function for which it is designed.

228(3)  An employer must ensure that the use of personal protective equipment does not itself endanger the worker.

Eye Protection

Compliance with standards

229(1)  If a worker’s eyes may be injured or irritated at a work site, an employer must ensure that the worker wears properly fitting eye protection equipment that

                                 (a)    is approved to

                                           (i)    CSA Standard Z94.3‑07, Eye and Face Protectors,

                                          (ii)    CSA Standard Z94.3‑02, Eye and Face Protectors, or

                                         (iii)    CSA Standard Z94.3‑99, Industrial Eye and Face Protectors, and

                                 (b)    is appropriate to the work being done and the hazard involved.

229(2)  Prescription eyewear may be worn if it

                                 (a)    is safety eyewear,

                                 (b)    meets the requirements of

                                           (i)    CSA Standard Z94.3‑07, Eye and Face Protectors,

                                          (ii)    CSA Standard Z94.3‑02, Eye and Face Protectors, or

                                         (iii)    CSA Standard Z94.3‑99, Industrial Eye and Face Protectors, and

                                 (c)    is appropriate to the work and the hazard involved.

229(2.1)  Prescription safety eyewear having glass lenses must not be used if there is danger of impact unless it is worn behind equipment meeting the requirements of subsection (1).

229(2.2)  If the use of plastic prescription lenses is impracticable, and there is no danger of impact, a worker may use lenses made of treated safety glass meeting the requirements of

                                 (a)    ANSI Standard Z87.1‑2003, Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protection Devices, or

                                 (b)    ANSI Standard Z87.1‑1989, Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection.

229(2.3)  Despite subsection (2), prescription safety eyewear may consist of frames that meet the requirements of ANSI Standard Z87.1‑2003, Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protection Devices provided the lenses meet the requirements of CSA Standard Z94.3‑07, Eye and Face Protectors.

229(3)  If a worker must wear a full face piece respirator and the face piece is intended to prevent materials striking the eyes, an employer must ensure that the face piece

                                 (a)    meets the requirements of

                                           (i)    CSA Standard Z94.3‑07, Eye and Face Protectors, or

                                          (ii)    CSA Standard Z94.3‑02, Eye and Face Protectors, or

                                 (b)    meets the impact and penetration test requirements of section 9 of

                                           (i)    ANSI Standard Z87.1‑2003, Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protection Devices, or

                                          (ii)    ANSI Standard Z87.1‑1989, Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection.

Contact lenses

230   An employer must ensure that, if wearing contact lenses poses a hazard to the worker’s eyes during work, the worker is advised of the hazards and the alternatives to wearing contact lenses.

Electric arc welding

231   A worker must not perform electric arc welding if it is reasonably possible for another worker to be exposed to radiation from the arc unless the other worker is wearing suitable eye protection or is protected by a screen.

Flame Resistant Clothing

Use of flame resistant clothing

232(1)  If a worker may be exposed to a flash fire or electrical equipment flashover, an employer must ensure that the worker wears flame resistant outerwear and uses other protective equipment appropriate to the hazard.

232(2)  A worker must ensure that clothing worn beneath flame resistant outerwear and against the skin is made of flame resistant fabrics or natural fibres that will not melt when exposed to heat.

Foot Protection

Footwear

233(1)  An employer must ensure that a worker uses footwear that is appropriate to the hazards associated with the work being performed and the work site.

233(1.1)  An employer must not require a worker to wear footwear that may pose a health or safety risk to the worker.

233(2)  If the hazard assessment identifies that protective footwear needs to have toe protection, a puncture resistant sole, metatarsal protection, electrical protection, chainsaw protection or any combination of these, the employer must ensure that the worker wears protective footwear that is approved to

                                 (a)    CSA Standard Z195‑02, Protective Footwear, or

                                 (b)    ASTM Standard F2413‑05, Specification for Performance Requirements for Protective Footwear,

if the protective footwear was manufactured on or after July 1, 2009.

233(3)  Despite subsection (2), if a worker is likely to be exposed to a hazard other than those referred to in subsection (2), the employer must ensure that the worker uses footwear appropriate to the hazard.

233(4)  If a worker is unable, for medical reasons, to wear protective footwear that complies with subsection (2), the worker may substitute external safety toecaps if the employer ensures that

                                 (a)    the safety toecaps meet the impact force requirements of

                                           (i)    CSA Standard Z195‑02, Protective Footwear, or

                                          (ii)    ASTM Standard F2413‑05, Specification for Performance Requirements for Protective Footwear,

                                 (b)    metatarsal protection is not needed to protect the feet from injury,

                                 (c)    the hazard assessment confirms that the worker will not be exposed to any sole penetration hazards, and

                                 (d)    wearing the safety toecaps does not itself create a hazard for the worker.

233(5)  An employer must ensure that a fire fighter wears safety footwear that is approved to

                                 (a)    CSA Standard Z195‑02, Protective Footwear,

                                 (b)    NFPA Standard 1971, Protective Ensemble for Structural Fire Fighting, 2007 Edition, or

                                 (c)    NFPA Standard 1977, Protective Clothing and Equipment for Wildland Fire Fighting, 2005 Edition,

if the safety footwear was manufactured on or after July 1, 2009.

AR 87/2009 s233;213/2018

Head Protection

Industrial headwear

234(1)  Subject to sections 235, 236 and 237, if there is a foreseeable danger of injury to a worker’s head at a work site and there is a significant possibility of lateral impact to the head, an employer must ensure that the worker wears industrial protective headwear that is appropriate to the hazards and meets the requirements of

                                 (a)    CSA Standard CAN/CSA‑Z94.1‑05, Industrial Protective Headwear, or

                                 (b)    ANSI Standard Z89.1‑2003, American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection, for Type II head protection,

if the protective headwear was manufactured on or after July 1, 2009.

234(2)  Subject to sections 235, 236 and 237, if there is a foreseeable danger of injury to a worker’s head at a work site and the possibility of lateral impact to the head is unlikely, an employer must ensure that the worker wears industrial protective headwear that is appropriate to the hazard and meets the requirements of

                                 (a)    CSA Standard CAN/CSA‑Z94.1‑05, Industrial Protective Headwear, or

                                 (b)    ANSI Standard Z89.1‑2003, American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection,

if the protective headwear was manufactured on or after July 1, 2009

Bicycles and skates

235(1)  An employer must ensure that a worker who is riding a bicycle or using in‑line skates or a similar means of transport wears a safety helmet

                                 (a)    that is approved to one of the following standards for bicycle safety helmets if the helmet was manufactured on or after July 1, 2009:

                                           (i)    CSA CAN/CSA‑D113.2‑M89 (R2004), Cycling Helmets;

                                          (ii)    CPSC, Title 16 Code of U.S. Federal Regulations Part 1203, Safety Standard for Bicycle Helmets;

                                         (iii)    Snell Memorial Foundation B‑90A, 1998 Standard for Protective Headgear for Use with Bicycles;

                                         (iv)    Snell Memorial Foundation B‑95A, 1998 Standard for Protective Headgear for Use with Bicycles;

                                          (v)    Snell Memorial Foundation N‑94, 1994 Standard for Protective Headgear in Non‑Motorized Sports;

                                         (vi)    ASTM F1447‑06, Standard Specification for Helmets Used in Recreational Bicycling or Roller Skating;

                              (vii) ‑ (x)    Repealed; and

                                 (b)    that is free of damage or modification that would reduce its effectiveness.

235(2)  Despite subsection (1), if workers at a work site normally wear industrial protective headwear in accordance with section 234, that protective headwear may be worn by workers using a bicycle or similar means of transport at the work site if

                                 (a)    the worker travels at a speed of not more than 20 kilometres per hour, and

                                 (b)    the protective headwear is worn with a fastened chin strap.

All‑terrain vehicles, snow vehicles, motorcycles

236(1)  An employer must ensure that a worker riding an all‑terrain vehicle, snow vehicle, motorized trail bike or motorcycle or, subject to subsection (2), a small utility vehicle at a work site wears a safety helmet approved to one of the following standards:

                                 (a)    U.S.A. Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard FMVSS 218, Motorcycle Helmets 1993 OCT;

                                 (b)    BSI Standard BS 6658: 05, Specification for Protective Helmets for Vehicle Users;

                                 (c)    Snell Memorial Foundation Standard M2005, 2005 Helmet Standard for Use in Motorcycling,

if the safety helmet was manufactured on or after July 1, 2009.

236(1.1)  Subsection (1) does not apply to small utility vehicles equipped with seat belts and rollover protection.

236(2)  Protective headwear in good condition that meets the requirements of an earlier version of a standard listed in subsection (1) may be used unless it is damaged.

236(3)  Subsection (1) does not apply if the vehicle is equipped with rollover protective structures that comply with section 270 and seat belts or restraining devices that comply with section 271.

236(4)  A worker who wears protective headwear under subsection (1) and who uses an all‑terrain vehicle, snow vehicle, motorized trail bike or motorcycle to travel to a remote work site may continue to wear that protective headwear while working at the work site if

                                 (a)    the work does not subject the worker to potential contact with exposed energized electrical sources, and

                                 (b)    the work is done for a short period of time.

Fire fighters

237   Despite section 234, an employer may permit a fire fighter to wear protective headwear that meets the requirements of the following standards considering the nature of the hazard:

                                 (a)    NFPA Standard 1971, Protective Ensemble for Structural Fire Fighting, 2007 Edition, or

                                 (b)    NFPA Standard 1977, Protective Clothing and Equipment for Wildland Fire Fighting, 2005 Edition,

if the protective headwear was manufactured on or after July 1, 2009.

Bump hat

238   Despite section 234, an employer may permit a worker to wear a bump hat at the work site if the danger of injury is limited to the worker’s head striking a stationary object.

Exemption from wearing headwear

239(1)  Despite section 234, if it is impractical for a worker to wear industrial protective headwear during a particular work process,

                                 (a)    the employer must ensure that the worker’s head is protected using an adequate alternative means of protection during the work process, and

                                 (b)    the worker may conduct the work while the alternative means of protection is in place.

239(2)  A worker must wear industrial protective headwear if the foreseeable danger of injury to the worker’s head persists immediately after completing the work process referred to in subsection (1).

Life Jackets and Personal
Flotation Devices

Compliance with standards

240(1)  An employer must ensure that a life jacket is approved to CGSB Standard CAN/CGSB 65.7‑M88 AMEND, Lifejackets, Inherently Buoyant Type, and any amendments for approved small vessel life jackets.

240(2)  An employer must ensure that a personal flotation device is approved to CGSB Standard CAN/CGSB 65.11‑M88 AMEND, Personal Flotation Device, and any amendments for personal flotation devices, type 1 (inherently buoyant).

Use of jackets and flotation devices

241(1)  If there is a foreseeable danger that a worker could be exposed to the hazard of drowning, an employer must ensure that the worker wears a life jacket.

241(2)  A worker who could be exposed to the hazard of drowning must wear a life jacket.

241(2.1)  Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply if other safety measures are in place that will protect a worker from the hazard of drowning.

241(3)  Despite subsections (1) and (2), if a worker performs work from a boat for an extended period of time, the worker may wear a personal flotation device if the employer ensures that there is also a life jacket readily accessible to each worker on the boat.

Limb and Body Protection

Limb and body protection

242   If there is a danger that a worker’s hand, arm, leg or torso may be injured, an employer must ensure that the worker wears properly fitting hand, arm, leg or body protective equipment that is appropriate to the work, the work site and the hazards identified.

Skin protection

243   An employer must ensure that a worker’s skin is protected from a harmful substance that may injure the skin on contact or may adversely affect a worker’s health if it is absorbed through the skin.

Respiratory Protective Equipment

Respiratory dangers

244(1)  An employer must determine the degree of danger to a worker at a work site and whether the worker needs to wear respiratory protective equipment if

                                 (a)    a worker is or may be exposed to an airborne contaminant or a mixture of airborne contaminants in a concentration exceeding their occupational exposure limits,

                                 (b)    the atmosphere has or may have an oxygen concentration of less than 19.5 percent by volume, or

                                 (c)    a worker is or may be exposed to an airborne biohazardous material.

244(2)  In making a determination under subsection (1), the employer must consider

                                 (a)    the nature and exposure circumstances of any contaminants or biohazardous material,

                                 (b)    the concentration or likely concentration of any airborne contaminants,

                                 (c)    the duration or likely duration of the worker’s exposure,

                                 (d)    the toxicity of the contaminants,

                                 (e)    the concentration of oxygen,

                                 (f)    the warning properties of the contaminants, and

                                 (g)    the need for emergency escape.

244(3)  Based on a determination under subsection (1), the employer must

                                 (a)    subject to subsection 3(b), provide and ensure the availability of the appropriate respiratory protective equipment to the worker at the work site, and

                                 (b)    despite section 247, when the effects of airborne biohazardous materials are unknown, provide and ensure the availability of respiratory protective equipment appropriate to the worker’s known exposure circumstances.

244(3.1)  Subsection (3) does not apply when an employer has developed and implemented procedures that effectively limit exposure to airborne biohazardous material.

244(4)  A worker must use the appropriate  respiratory equipment provided by the employer under subsection (3).

Code of practice

245(1)  If respiratory protective equipment is used at a work site, an employer must prepare a code of practice governing the selection, maintenance and use of respiratory protective equipment.

245(2)  In the case of a health care worker who may be exposed to airborne biohazardous material, an employer must ensure that the code of practice required under subsection (1) includes training on at least an annual basis.

Approval of equipment

246   An employer must ensure that respiratory protective equipment required at a work site is approved

                                 (a)    by NIOSH, or

                                 (b)    by another standards setting and equipment testing organization, or combination of organizations, approved by a Director of Occupational Hygiene.

Selection of equipment

247   An employer must ensure that respiratory protective equipment used at a work site is selected in accordance with CSA Standard Z94.4‑02, Selection, Use and Care of Respirators.

Storage and use

248(1)  An employer must ensure that respiratory protective equipment kept ready to protect a worker is

                                 (a)    stored in a readily accessible location,

                                 (b)    stored in a manner that prevents its contamination,

                                 (c)    maintained in a clean and sanitary condition,

                                 (d)    inspected before and after each use to ensure it is in satisfactory working condition, and

                                 (e)    serviced and used in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.

248(2)  An employer must ensure that respiratory protective equipment that is not used routinely but is kept for emergency use is inspected at least once every calendar month by a competent worker to ensure it is in satisfactory working condition.

Quality of breathing air

249(1)  An employer must ensure that air used in a self‑contained breathing apparatus or an air line respirator

                                 (a)    is of a quality that meets the requirements of Table 1 of CSA Standard Z180.1‑00 (R2005), Compressed Breathing Air and Systems, and

                                 (b)    does not contain a substance in a concentration that exceeds 10 percent of its occupational exposure limit.

249(2)  Subsection (1)(b) does not apply to substances listed in Table 1 of CSA Standard Z180.1‑00 (R2005), Compressed Breathing Air and Systems.

Effective facial seal

250(1)  An employer must ensure that respiratory protective equipment that depends on an effective facial seal for its safe use is correctly fit tested and tested in accordance with CSA Standard Z94.4‑02, Selection, Use and Care of Respirators.

250(2)  An employer must ensure that, if a worker is or may be required to wear respiratory protective equipment and the effectiveness of the equipment depends on an effective facial seal, the worker is clean shaven where the face piece of the equipment seals to the skin of the face.

AR 87/2009 s250;56/2018

Equipment for immediate danger

251   If an employer determines under section 244 that breathing conditions at a work site are or may become immediately dangerous to life or health, the employer must ensure that a worker wears self‑contained breathing apparatus or an air line respirator that

                                 (a)    is of a type that will maintain positive pressure in the face piece,

                                 (b)    has a capacity of at least 30 minutes unless the employer’s hazard assessment indicates the need for a greater capacity,

                                 (c)    provides full face protection in situations where contaminants may irritate or damage the eyes,

                                 (d)    in the case of an air line respirator, is fitted with an auxiliary supply of respirable air of sufficient quantity to enable the worker to escape from the area in an emergency, and

                                 (e)    in the case of a self‑contained breathing apparatus, has an alarm warning of low pressure.

Equipment — no immediate danger

252   An employer must ensure that a worker wears self‑contained breathing apparatus or an air line respirator having a capacity of at least 30 minutes if

                                 (a)    the employer determines under section 244 that conditions at the work site are not or cannot become immediately dangerous to life or health but

                                           (i)    the oxygen content of the atmosphere is or may be less than 19.5 percent by volume, or

                                          (ii)    the concentration of airborne contaminants exceeds or may exceed that specified by the manufacturer for air purifying respiratory equipment, and

                                 (b)    the complete equipment required by section 251 is not provided.

Air purifying equipment

253   An employer may permit workers to wear air purifying respiratory protective equipment if

                                 (a)    the oxygen content of the air is, and will continue to be, 19.5 percent or greater by volume,

                                 (b)    the air purifying equipment used is designed to provide protection against the specific airborne contaminant, or combination of airborne contaminants, present, and

                                 (c)    the concentration of airborne contaminants does not exceed the maximum concentration specified by the manufacturer for the specific type of air purifying equipment, taking into consideration the duration of its use.

Emergency escape equipment

254(1)  Despite sections 251 and 252, if normal operating conditions do not require the wearing of respiratory protective equipment but emergency conditions may occur requiring a worker to escape from the work area, the employer may permit the escaping worker to wear

                                 (a)    a mouth bit and nose‑clamp respirator if

                                           (i)    the respirator is designed to protect the worker from the specific airborne contaminants present, and

                                          (ii)    the oxygen content of the atmosphere during the escape is 19.5 percent or greater by volume, or

                                 (b)    alternative respiratory protective equipment that can be proven to give the worker the same or greater protection as the equipment referred to in clause (a).

254(2)  Before permitting a worker to use the equipment referred to in subsection (1), the employer must consider the length of time it will take the worker to escape from the work area.

Abrasive blasting operations

255   If a worker is performing abrasive blasting, the employer must ensure that the worker wears a hood specifically designed for abrasive blasting, supplied with air that is at a positive pressure of not more than 140 kilopascals.

Part 19
Powered Mobile Equipment

Operator responsibilities

256(1)  A worker must not operate powered mobile equipment unless the worker

                                 (a)    is trained to safely operate the equipment,

                                 (b)    has demonstrated competency in operating the equipment to a competent worker designated by the employer,

                                 (c)    is familiar with the equipment’s operating instructions, and

                                 (d)    is authorized by the employer to operate the equipment.

256(2)  Subsections (1)(a), (b) and (c) do not apply if a worker in training operates the equipment under the direct supervision of a competent worker designated by the employer.

256(3)  The operator of powered mobile equipment must

                                 (a)    report to the employer any conditions affecting the safe operation of the equipment,

                                 (b)    operate the equipment safely,

                                 (c)    maintain full control of the equipment at all times,

                                 (d)    use the seat belts and other safety equipment in the powered mobile equipment,

                                 (e)    ensure that passengers in the powered mobile equipment use the seat belts and other safety equipment in the powered mobile equipment, and

                                 (f)    keep the cab, floor and deck of the powered mobile equipment free of materials, tools or other objects that could interfere with the operation of the controls or create a tripping or other hazard to the operator or other occupants of the equipment.

256(4)  Despite subsection (3)(d) and (e), in the case of a farming and ranching operation, the operator of powered mobile equipment must

                                 (a)    use the seat belts and other safety equipment, and

                                 (b)    ensure that passengers use the seat belts and other safety equipment,

in the powered mobile equipment only if it is reasonably practicable to do so.

AR 87/2009 s256;152/2018

Visual inspection

257(1)  Before operating powered mobile equipment, the operator must complete a visual inspection of the equipment and the surrounding area to ensure that the powered mobile equipment is in safe operating condition and that no worker, including the operator, is endangered when the equipment is started up.

257(2)  While powered mobile equipment is in operation, the operator must complete a visual inspection of the equipment and surrounding area at the intervals required by the manufacturer’s specifications or, in the absence of manufacturer’s specifications, the employer’s operating procedures.

257(3)  Despite subsections (1) and (2), if the powered mobile equipment is continuously operated as part of an ongoing work operation, the operator may visually inspect the equipment during the work shift or work period as required by the employer’s operating procedures.

257(4)  A person must not start powered mobile equipment if the visual inspection under subsection (1) is not completed.

Visual inspection on a farm or ranch

257.1   In the case of a farming and ranching operation, section 257 does not apply unless there is a hazard identified that requires a visual inspection to be performed as a hazard control.

AR 152/2018 s13

Dangerous movement

258(1)  If the movement of a load or the cab, counterweight or any other part of powered mobile equipment creates a danger to workers,

                                 (a)    an employer must not permit a worker to remain within range of the moving load or part, and

                                 (b)    the operator must not move the load or the equipment if a worker is exposed to the danger.

258(2)  If the movement of a load or the cab, counterweight or any other part of powered mobile equipment creates a danger to workers, a worker must not remain within range of the moving load or part.

258(3)  If a worker could be caught between a moving part of a unit of powered mobile equipment and another object, an employer must

                                 (a)    restrict entry to the area by workers, or

                                 (b)    require workers to maintain a clearance distance of at least 600 millimetres between the powered mobile equipment and the object.

Pedestrian traffic

259(1)  An employer must ensure that, if reasonably practicable,

                                 (a)    walkways are designated that separate pedestrian traffic from areas where powered mobile equipment is operating,

                                 (b)    workers use the designated walkways.

259(2)  If it is not reasonably practicable to use designated walkways, an employer must ensure that safe work procedures are used to protect workers who enter areas where powered mobile equipment is operating.

Inspection and maintenance

260(1)   An employer must ensure that powered mobile equipment is inspected by a competent worker for defects and conditions that are hazardous or may create a hazard.

260(2)  An inspection under subsection (1) must be made in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.

260(3)  If an inspection under subsection (1) indicates that powered mobile equipment is hazardous or potentially hazardous, an employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    the health and safety of a worker who may be exposed to the hazard is protected immediately,

                                 (b)    the powered mobile equipment is not operated until the defect is repaired or the condition is corrected, and

                                 (c)    the defect is repaired or the unsafe condition corrected as soon as reasonably practicable.

260(4)  Despite subsection (3), if an inspection under subsection (1) indicates that the powered mobile equipment is potentially hazardous but the equipment can be operated safely, an employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    the operator is made aware of the potential hazard, and

                                 (b)    the defect or condition is repaired as soon as reasonably practicable.

260(5)  An employer must ensure that a record of the inspections and maintenance carried out as required by subsections (1) and (2) is kept at the work site and readily available to a worker who operates the powered mobile equipment.

260(6)  Subsection (2) does not apply to a farming and ranching operation.

AR 87/2009 s260;152/2018

Maintenance on elevated parts

261   An employer must ensure that if elevated parts of powered mobile equipment are being maintained or repaired by workers, the parts and the powered mobile equipment are securely blocked in place and cannot move accidentally.

Starting engines

262(1)  Subject to subsection (3), an employer must ensure that a worker does not start the power unit of powered mobile equipment if the drive mechanisms and clutches of the equipment are engaged.

262(2)  A worker must not start the power unit of powered mobile equipment if the drive mechanisms and clutches of the equipment are engaged.

262(3)  An employer must ensure that no worker, including the operator, can be injured due to the movement of powered mobile equipment or any part of it, if

                                 (a)    its power unit can be started from a location other than the equipment’s control platform or cab seat, or

                                 (b)    it is not reasonably practicable to disengage its drive mechanism or clutches.

Unattended equipment

263(1)  A person must not leave the controls of powered mobile equipment unattended unless the equipment is secured against unintentional movement by an effective method of immobilizing the equipment.

263(2)  A person must not leave the controls of powered mobile equipment unattended unless a suspended or elevated part of the powered mobile equipment is either landed, secured in a safe position, or both.

Lights

264(1)  An employer must ensure that powered mobile equipment operated during hours of darkness or when, due to insufficient light or unfavourable atmospheric conditions, workers and vehicles are not clearly discernible at a distance of at least 150 metres, is equipped with lights that illuminate

                                 (a)    a direction in which the equipment travels,

                                 (b)    the working area around the equipment, and

                                 (c)    the control panel of the equipment.

264(2)  An employer must ensure that the lights on earthmoving construction machinery installed on or after July 1, 2009 complies with SAE Standard J1029 (2007), Lighting and Marking of Construction, Earthmoving Machinery.

Windows and windshields

265(1)  An employer must ensure that glazing used as part of the enclosure for a cab, canopy or rollover protective structure on powered mobile equipment is safety glass or another non‑shattering material providing at least equivalent protection.

265(2)  An employer must ensure that the glazing installed on or after July 1, 2009 on an enclosure of powered mobile equipment is approved to ANSI Standard ANSI/SAE Z26.1 (1996), Safety Glazing Material for Glazing Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Equipment Operating on Land Highways — Safety Standard.

265(3)  An employer must ensure that broken or cracked glazing that obstructs an operator’s view from powered mobile equipment is replaced as soon as is reasonably practicable.

265(4)  An employer must ensure that a windshield on powered mobile equipment has windshield wipers of sufficient size and capacity to clean matter that obstructs the operator’s view from the windshield.

Other safety equipment

266   An employer must ensure that powered mobile equipment has

                                 (a)    a device within easy reach of the operator that permits the operator to stop, as quickly as possible, the power unit, drawworks, transmission or any ancillary equipment driven from the powered mobile equipment, including a power take‑off auger or digging, lifting, or cutting equipment,

                                 (b)    an effective means of warning workers of the presence, general dimensions and movement of the equipment if the presence, dimensions or movement may be a danger to a worker,

                                 (c)    seats or other installations sufficient to ensure the safety of the operator and other workers who may be in or on the equipment while it is in motion, and

                                 (d)    safety clips on the connecting pins if the powered mobile equipment is equipped with a trailer hitch.

Warning signal

267(1)  An employer must ensure that, if a powered mobile equipment operator’s view of the equipment’s path of travel is obstructed or cannot be seen directly or indirectly in a direction, the powered mobile equipment has

                                 (a)    an automatic audible warning device that

                                           (i)    activates if the equipment controls are positioned to move the equipment in that direction, and

                                          (ii)    is audible above the ambient noise level,

                                 (b)    a warning device or method appropriate to the hazards of the work site, or

                                 (c)    an automatic system that stops the equipment if a worker is in its path.

267(2)  If it is impractical to equip powered mobile equipment in accordance with subsection (1), the operator must ensure that the operator and other workers are protected from injury before moving the equipment by

                                 (a)    doing a visual inspection on foot of the area into which the equipment will move,

                                 (b)    following the directions of a traffic control or warning system,

                                 (c)    getting directions from a designated signaller or other worker who

                                           (i)    has an unobstructed view of the area into which the equipment will move, or

                                          (ii)    is stationed in a safe position in continuous view of the operator, or

                                 (d)    ensuring all other workers are removed from the area into which the equipment will move.

Bulkheads

268   An employer must install a bulkhead or provide other effective means to protect the operator of a vehicle transporting equipment or materials that may shift during an emergency stop.

Guards and screens

269   An employer must ensure that powered mobile equipment has a cab, screen, shield, grill, deflector, guard or other adequate protection for the operator if the hazard assessment indicates there is a significant possibility that the operator may be injured by flying or projecting objects.

Rollover protective structures

270(1)  An employer must ensure that the following types of powered mobile equipment weighing 700 kilograms or more have rollover protective structures:

                                 (a)    tracked (crawler) or wheeled bulldozers, loaders, tractors or skidders, other than those operating with side booms;

                                 (b)    back hoes with a limited horizontal swing of 180 degrees;

                                 (c)    motor graders;

                                 (d)    self‑propelled wheeled scrapers;

                                 (e)    industrial, agricultural and horticultural tractors, including ride‑on lawnmowers;

                                 (f)    wheeled trenchers.

270(2)  An employer must ensure that a rollover protective structure installed on or after July 1, 2009 complies with the applicable requirements of

                                 (a)    CSA Standard B352.0‑95 (R2006), Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS) for Agricultural, Construction, Earthmoving, Forestry, Industrial and Mining Machines  — Part 1: General Requirements, and

                                           (i)    CSA Standard B352.1‑95 (R2006), Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS) for Agricultural, Construction, Earthmoving, Forestry, Industrial and Mining Machines — Part 2: Testing Requirements for ROPS on Agricultural Tractors, or

                                          (ii)    CSA Standard B352.2‑95 (R2006), Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS) for Agricultural, Construction, Earthmoving, Forestry, Industrial and Mining Machines  — Part 3: Testing Requirements for ROPS on Construction, Earthmoving, Forestry, Industrial and Mining Machines,

                                 (b)    SAE Standard J1042 (2003), Operator Protection for General‑Purpose Industrial Machines,

                                 (c)    SAE Standard J1194 (1999), Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS) for Wheeled Agricultural Tractors,

                                 (d)    ISO Standard 3471: 2000, Earth‑moving machinery – Roll‑over protective structures – Laboratory tests and performance requirements, or

                                 (e)    OSHA Standard 1928.52, Protective Frames for Wheel‑type Agricultural Tractors – Tests, Procedures and Performance Requirements.

270(3)  If powered mobile equipment is not referred to in subsection (1) and a hazard assessment identifies rollover as a potential hazard, the employer must

                                 (a)    equip the powered mobile equipment with a rollover protective structure that is either supplied by the manufacturer or certified by a professional engineer as being suited to that equipment, or

                                 (b)    institute safe work procedures that eliminate the possibility of rollover.

270(4)  This section does not apply to a farming and ranching operation.

AR 87/2009 s270;152/2018

Rollover protective structures on farm or ranch

270.1(1)  In the case of a farming and ranching operation, the employer must perform a hazard assessment relating to the potential for the following types of powered mobile equipment weighing 700 kilograms or more to roll over while they are being operated:

                                 (a)    tracked (crawler) or wheeled bulldozers, loaders, tractors or skidders, other than those operating with side booms;

                                 (b)    back hoes with a limited horizontal swing of 180 degrees;

                                 (c)    motor graders;

                                 (d)    self-propelled wheeled scrapers;

                                 (e)    industrial, agricultural and horticultural tractors, including ride-on lawnmowers, and

                                 (f)    wheeled trenchers.

270.1(2)  A hazard assessment performed under subsection (1) must be based on the relevant circumstances of the proposed operation, including

                                 (a)    the stability of the powered mobile equipment, taking into account such factors as the configuration of the equipment and any attachments mounted on or pulled or pushed by the equipment during operation,

                                 (b)    the ground conditions where the powered mobile equipment will be operated, including the presence of ditches, drop-offs, and ground irregularities such as holes, soft spots or mounds,

                                 (c)    the grades on which the powered mobile equipment will be operated,

                                 (d)    the nature of the activities to be performed with the powered mobile equipment,

                                 (e)    the training and experience of the operator, and

                                 (f)    the presence or absence of a supervisor.

270.1(3)  If a hazard assessment under subsections (1) and (2) identifies rollover as a potential hazard, the employer must

                                 (a)    equip the powered mobile equipment with a rollover protective structure

                                           (i)    that is supplied by the manufacturer, or

                                          (ii)    that a service provider or a person who is competent has stated in writing will provide adequate protection to workers,

                                     or

                                 (b)    institute safe work procedures to eliminate the possibility of rollover.

AR 152/2018 s15

Equipment with rollover protection

271(1)  An employer must ensure that the powered mobile equipment fitted with a rollover protective structure manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 has seat belts for the operator and passengers that comply with

                                 (a)    SAE Standard J386 (2006), Operator Restraint System for Off‑Road Work Machines, or

                                 (b)    SAE Information Report J2292 (2006), Combination Pelvic/Upper Torso (Type 2) Operator Restraint Systems for Off‑Road Work Machines.

271(2)  Despite subsection (1), if the work process makes wearing the seat belts in the powered mobile equipment impracticable, the employer may permit workers to wear shoulder belts or use bars, screens or other restraining devices designed to prevent the operator or a passenger from being thrown out of the rollover protective structure.

Falling objects protective structures

272(1)  If the hazard assessment identifies that an operator of powered mobile equipment is exposed to falling objects, the employer must ensure that the powered mobile equipment is equipped with a falling objects protective structure.

272(2)  A falling objects protective structure installed on or after July 1, 2009 must comply with the appropriate requirements of

                                 (a)    SAE Standard J167 (2002), Overhead Protection for Agricultural Tractors – Test Procedures and Performance Requirements,

                                 (b)    SAE Standard J/ISO 3449 (2005), Earthmoving Machinery — Falling‑Object Protective Structures—Laboratory Tests and Performance Requirements, or

                                 (c)    SAE Standard J1042 (2003), Operator Protection for General‑Purpose Industrial Machines.

272(3)  An employer, instead of using a falling objects protective structure that complies with subsection (2), may use equipment that is certified by a professional engineer as providing the equivalent or better protection.

Recertification after modification

273   An employer must ensure that any addition, modification, welding or cutting of a rollover protective structure or a falling objects protective structure is done in accordance with the instructions of, and is re‑certified as restored to its original performance requirements by, the equipment manufacturer or a professional engineer.

Fuel tank in cab

274   An employer must ensure that a fuel tank located in the enclosed cab of a unit of powered mobile equipment has a filler spout and vents

                                 (a)    extending outside the cab, and

                                 (b)    that are sealed to prevent vapours from entering the enclosed cab.

Worker transportation

275(1)  An employer must ensure that no part of an operator’s or passenger’s body extends beyond the side of a vehicle or powered mobile equipment while it is in operation.

275(2)  An employer must ensure that equipment or material in a vehicle or unit of powered mobile equipment is positioned or secured to prevent injury to the operator and passengers, if any.

275(3)  An employer must ensure that sufficient protection against inclement weather is provided for workers travelling in a vehicle or unit of powered mobile equipment.

275(4)  If a vehicle or unit of powered mobile equipment with an enclosed body is used to transport workers, an employer must ensure that the equipment’s exhaust gases do not enter the enclosed body.

Riding on loads

276   A person must not ride on top of a load that is being moved.

Transportation on mobile equipment on a farm or ranch

276.1(1)  On a farming and ranching operation, a worker may be transported on mobile equipment not designed for the transportation of workers if

                                 (a)    the worker is safely positioned,

                                 (b)    the mobile equipment is operated at a speed of no more than 10 km/h, and

                                 (c)    the terrain is suitable to enable the worker to be safely transported.

276.1(2)  Despite subsection (1), a worker must not be transported on

                                 (a)    a tongue or drawbar connecting mobile equipment together, or

                                 (b)    a fork or other mobile equipment implements that pose a risk of injury to the worker.

AR 152/2018 s16

Hazardous loads

277(1)  An employer must ensure that workers are not servicing or maintaining a vehicle while flammable, combustible or explosive materials are

                                 (a)    being loaded into or unloaded from the vehicle, or

                                 (b)    in the vehicle, other than in the vehicle’s fuel tank or a portable fuel tank that is approved to the appropriate ULC standard for that tank.

277(2)  For the purposes of subsection (1), servicing and maintaining a vehicle does not include checking or topping up fluid levels or air pressure.

277(3)  A worker must not service or maintain a vehicle in contravention of subsection (1).

Tank trucks

278(1)  The operator must ensure that a tank truck containing flammable, combustible or explosive materials is bonded and grounded while

                                 (a)    its loading lines are connected or disconnected, and

                                 (b)    the contents of the tank truck are being transferred.

278(1.1)  Despite subsection (1), on a farming or ranching operation, the operator is only required to ensure that a conductive tank truck is bonded if the truck is being used to transfer flammable, combustible or explosive materials directly to powered mobile equipment.

278(1.2)  For greater certainty, on a farming and ranching operation, the operator must ensure that a conductive tank truck containing flammable, combustible or explosive materials is bonded when used to transfer flammable, combustible or explosive materials to a stationary storage container that is grounded.

278(2)  Section 277 does not apply to a commercial tank truck designed to transport flammable, combustible or explosive materials.

AR 87/2009 s278;152/2018

Refuelling

279(1)  An employer must ensure that a worker does not

                                 (a)    smoke within 7.5 metres of a vehicle while it is being refuelled,

                                 (b)    refuel a vehicle when there is a source of ignition within 7.5 metres of that vehicle, or

                                 (c)    dispense flammable fuels into the fuel tank of a motor vehicle or watercraft while its engine is running.

279(2)  A person must not

                                 (a)    smoke within 7.5 metres of a vehicle while it is being refuelled,

                                 (b)    refuel a vehicle when there is a source of ignition within 7.5 metres of that vehicle, or

                                 (c)    dispense flammable fuels into the fuel tank of a motor vehicle or watercraft while its engine is running.

279(3)  An employer must ensure that a worker dispensing flammable fuel

                                 (a)    takes precautions to prevent the fuel from overflowing or spilling,

                                 (b)    does not knowingly overfill the fuel system, and

                                 (c)    does not use an object or device that is not an integral part of the hose nozzle valve assembly to maintain the flow of fuel.

279(4)  Subsections (1)(c) and (2)(c) do not apply to the fuelling system of the motor vehicle or watercraft if its manufacturer or a professional engineer certifies

                                 (a)    it is safe to refuel while the engine is running, and

                                 (b)    the safe work practices to be used during the refuelling.

All‑Terrain Vehicles and Snow Vehicles

Three‑wheeled all‑terrain cycles

280   A person must not use a three‑wheeled all‑terrain vehicle at a work site.

Operator’s manual

281   An employer must ensure that the operator’s manual for an all‑terrain vehicle or snow vehicle is kept in a secure place with the vehicle or at another location readily accessible to the operator.

Load and slope limitations

282(1)  The operator of an all‑terrain vehicle or snow vehicle must ensure that, if it is used to move a load, the load conforms to the weight, height and other limits specified by the manufacturer of the all‑terrain vehicle or snow vehicle.

282(2)  If the manufacturer has not set limits for operation of the all‑terrain vehicle or snow vehicle on sloping ground, the employer must implement safe work procedures appropriate for the slopes on which the equipment is used.

Forklift Trucks

Load chart

283   An employer must ensure that a forklift truck has a durable and legible load rating chart that is readily available to the operator.

Seat belt

284   If a forklift truck is equipped with a seat belt by the original equipment manufacturer or a seat belt is added to the equipment at some later date, an employer must ensure that the seat belt is present and in useable condition.

Pile Driving Equipment and Practices

Chocking

285   The operator of pile driving equipment must ensure that a pile hammer is securely chocked while suspended by the hammer line if the equipment is not operating.

Pile hoisting

286(1)  The operator of pile driving equipment must ensure that pilings are not hoisted in the leads if workers who are not directly involved in the pile hoisting are on the superstructure or within range of a falling pile.

286(2)  A worker must not

                                 (a)    remain or ride on a load or part of a load being moved, raised or lowered by pile driving equipment, or

                                 (b)    be on the superstructure of pile driving equipment or within range of a falling pile if the worker is not directly involved in the pile hoisting.

Restraining hoses and connections

287   An employer must ensure that the pressure hoses of pile driving equipment with pressure hammers have, on the pressure side of all hose connections, safety chains or ropes designed to protect workers should the hoses or connections fail.

Brake bands and clutches

288   An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    at the beginning of a work shift, the brake bands and clutches of pile driving equipment are inspected by a competent worker designated by the employer, and

                                 (b)    if the worker finds contamination by oil or grease, the contaminated units are dismantled and cleaned or replaced before they are used.

Timber piles

289   The employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    workers in the area of a timber pile being struck by a pile driver are protected from any danger that may result from the pile shattering, and

                                 (b)    before piles are placed in position for driving, pile heads are cut square and timber piles are free of debris, bark and splintered wood.

Crane boom inspection

290(1)  An employer must ensure that a crane boom used for driving piles with a vibratory hammer is

                                 (a)    inspected

                                           (i)    at the intervals specified in the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, or

                                          (ii)    annually or every 600 operating hours, whichever comes first, and

                                 (b)    certified by a professional engineer as safe for continued use.

290(2)  An employer must ensure that a crane boom with a vibratory pile extractor is

                                 (a)    inspected

                                           (i)    at the intervals specified in the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, or

                                          (ii)    annually or every 200 operating hours, whichever comes first, and

                                 (b)    certified by a professional engineer as safe for continued use.

290(3)  An employer must ensure that a crane boom used for dynamic compaction is

                                 (a)    inspected

                                           (i)    at the intervals specified in the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, or

                                          (ii)    annually or every 200 operating hours, whichever comes first, and

                                 (b)    certified by a professional engineer as safe for continued use.

Personal Vehicle for Work Purposes

Licensing and mechanical inspection

290.1   If a worker uses a personal vehicle for work purposes,

                                 (a)    an employer must ensure that the worker complies with section 256(1) by complying with the appropriate licensed driver requirements of provincial legislation, and

                                 (b)    the worker must ensure that the vehicle is maintained in sound mechanical condition.

Concrete Pump Trucks

Safety requirements 

290.2(1)  An employer must ensure that all load bearing components of a concrete pump truck undergo non‑destructive testing under the direction and control of a professional engineer in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications at 12‑month intervals from the date of the concrete pump truck’s most recent certification.

290.2(2)  An employer must ensure that the operator of a concrete pump truck visually inspects all load bearing components and safety and control devices of the concrete pump truck before each use.

290.2(3)  Before using a concrete pump truck at a work site, an employer must ensure that the outriggers of the equipment are extended in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.

290.2(4)  While a concrete pump truck is in use at a work site, an employer must ensure that no worker or other person is positioned under a distribution boom or mast connected to the concrete pump truck.

290.2(5)  An employer must ensure that a concrete pump truck is not moved when its distribution boom or mast is partially or full extended, unless the truck is designed to be moved with its distribution boom or mast partially or fully extended.

Part 20
Radiation Exposure

Prevention and protection

291   If workers may be exposed to ionizing radiation at a work site, an employer must

                                 (a)    develop and implement safe work practices and procedures to be used when the workers deal with or approach the radiation source,

                                 (b)    if practicable, involve the workers in the development and implementation of the safe work practices and procedures, and

                                 (c)    inform the workers of the potential hazards of ionizing radiation and the radiation source.

Part 21
Rigging

Breaking strength

292(1)  An employer must ensure that rigging is not subjected to a load of more than

                                 (a)    10 percent of the breaking strength of the weakest part of the rigging, if a worker is being raised or lowered,

                                 (b)    subject to section 292.1, 20 percent of the ultimate breaking strength of the weakest part of the rigging in all other situations unless the manufacturer has fatigue rated the rigging in accordance with CEN Standard EN 1677‑1: 2000, Components for slings – Part 1: Forged steel components grade 8, and

                                 (c)    subject to section 292.1, if the rigging is fatigue rated in accordance with CEN Standard EN 1677‑1: 2000 and a worker is not being raised or lowered, the maximum load must not exceed 25 percent of the ultimate breaking strength.

292(2)  Despite subsection (1), an employer may use a dedicated rigging assembly designed and certified for a particular lift or project by a professional engineer, but the dedicated rigging assembly must be re‑rated to comply with subsection (1) before it is used for another lift or project.

Safety factors

292.1(1)  Subject to section 292, an employer must ensure that rigging components are rated relative to their ultimate breaking strength in accordance with the following safety factors:

                                 (a)    running lines                                                                 3.5 to 1;

                                 (b)    non‑rotating hoist lines                                                  5 to 1;

                                 (c)    tugger lines/blocks for pulling                                      3 to 1;

                                 (d)    pendant lines/guy lines                                           3 to 1; and

                                 (e)    winch lines                                                                        2 to 1.

292.1(2)  An employer must ensure that rigging components or hoisting lines that are used in any towing operation are not used for any hoisting operation.

Load ratings

293(1)  An employer must ensure that the maximum load rating of the rigging, as determined by the rigging manufacturer or a professional engineer, is legibly and conspicuously marked on the rigging.

293(2)  Despite subsection (1), if it is not practicable to mark the rigging, the employer must ensure the maximum load rating of the rigging is available to the workers at the work site.

Inspection

294   An employer must ensure that rigging to be used during a work shift is inspected thoroughly prior to each period of continuous use during the shift to ensure that the rigging is functional and safe.

Prohibition

295   A worker must not use rigging that does not comply with this Part.

Rigging protection

296   An employer must ensure that sharp edges on loads to be hoisted are guarded to prevent damage to the slings or straps of the rigging.

Standards

297(1)  An employer must ensure that wire rope, alloy steel chain, synthetic fibre rope, metal mesh slings and synthetic fibre slings manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 meet the requirements of  ASME Standard B30.9‑2006, Safety Standard for Cableways, Cranes, Derricks, Hoists, Hooks, Jacks and Slings.

297(2)  An employer must ensure that below‑the‑hook lifting devices, other than slings, meet the requirements of ASME Standard B30.20‑2006, Below the Hook Lifting Devices.

297(3)  Despite subsection (2), an employer may use a capacity data sheet to label a spreader bar with its rated capacity.

297(4)  Where a capacity data sheet is used in accordance with subsection (3), an employer must ensure that the data sheet and corresponding spreader bar are identified by a unique numbering system.

Slings

298(1)  An employer must ensure that synthetic fibre slings are permanently and legibly marked or appropriately tagged with the following:

                                 (a)    the manufacturer’s name or trade  mark;

                                 (b)    the manufacturer’s code or stock number;

                                 (c)    the safe working load for the types of hitches permitted; and

                                 (d)    where appropriate, the type and material of construction.

298(2)  An employer must ensure that slings at a worksite are not subjected to pull tests beyond 100 percent of their rated load capacity.

Rope wound on drum

299(1)  An employer must ensure that rope on a winding drum is securely fastened to the drum.

299(2)  An employer must ensure that the number of wraps of rope remaining at all times on a drum

                                 (a)    complies with the manufacturer’s specifications for the rope and the drum, or

                                 (b)    if there are no manufacturer’s specifications, is not less than 5 full wraps.

Cable clips

300(1)  An employer must ensure that U‑bolt type clips used for fastening wire rope are installed

                                 (a)    so that the U‑bolt section of the clip bears on the short or “dead” side of the rope,

                                 (b)    so that the saddle of a clip bears on the long or “live” side of the rope, and

                                 (c)    using the number and with the spacing that complies with the specifications in Schedule 5.

300(2)  An employer must ensure that cable clips used for fastening wire rope are installed, and torqued to the manufacturer’s specifications or, in the absence of manufacturer’s specifications, to the values specified in Schedule 5.

300(3)  An employer must ensure that double‑saddle clips (fist clips) used for fastening wire rope are installed using the number and the spacing and torque that complies with the specifications in Schedule 5.

300(4)  An employer must ensure that double base clips used for fastening wire rope are installed with a spacing that is not less than 6 times the diameter of the rope.

Ferrules

301(1)  If a ferrule is used to form an eye loop in a wire rope and

                                 (a)    the ends of the splice are visible beneath the ferrule, or

                                 (b)    the ferrule is identified as covering a “Flemish eye” splice,

the employer must ensure that the ferrule is commercially manufactured of steel and properly swaged onto the splice.

301(2)  Despite subsection (1), if an aluminum alloy ferrule must be used, an employer must ensure that the ferrule is

                                 (a)    commercially manufactured,

                                 (b)    identified as being made of aluminum alloy, and

                                 (c)    properly swaged onto the splice.

Matching components

302(1)  An employer must ensure that the wire ropes, sheaves, spools and drums used in rigging have a diameter of not less than the diameter specified by the manufacturer for use in that circumstance.

302(2)  An employer must ensure that the rope used in rigging is of the correct size for the sheave, spool or drum over which the rope passes.

302(3)  An employer must ensure that the grooving of wire rope sheaves is of the correct size for the wire rope used.

302(4)  An employer must ensure that end fittings and connectors used on a wire rope conform to the manufacturer’s specifications as to number, size and method of installation.

302(5)  An employer must ensure that rigging blocks are constructed and installed so that the ropes cannot jump off the sheaves.

Safety latches

303(1)  An employer must ensure that a hook has a safety latch, mousing or shackle if the hook could cause injury if it is dislodged while in use.

303(2)  Despite subsection (1), if a competent worker disconnecting the hook would be in danger if the hook has a safety latch, mousing or shackle, the employer may use another type of hook.

303(3)  Despite subsection (1), an employer may use a sorting hook for hoisting a skeleton steel structure or for performing similar operations if a sorting hook is safer to use than a hook with a safety latch, mousing or shackle.

303(4)  During a hoisting operation in a caisson, an employer

                                 (a)    must not use a spring‑loaded safety latch hook, and

                                 (b)    must use a shackle assembly consisting of a pin fully shouldered into the eyes of the shackle and secured by a nut that is prevented from rotating by a cotter pin.

Makeshift rigging and welding

304   An employer must ensure that rigging does not have

                                 (a)    makeshift fittings or attachments, including those constructed from reinforcing steel rod, that are load bearing components,

                                 (b)    rigging and fittings that are repaired by welding unless they are certified safe for use by a professional engineer after the repair is completed, or

                                 (c)    alloy steel chain that is welded or annealed.

Rejection Criteria

Synthetic fibre slings

305(1)  An employer must ensure that a synthetic fibre web sling is permanently removed from service if it is damaged or worn as follows:

                                 (a)    the length of the edge cut exceeds the web thickness;

                                 (b)    the depth of an abrasion is more than 15 percent of the webbing thickness, taken as a proportion of all plies;

                                 (c)    the total depth of the abrasion on both sides of the webbing is more than 15 percent of the webbing thickness, taken as a proportion of all plies;

                                 (d)    the depth of the warp thread damage is up to 50 percent of the webbing thickness and the damage

                                           (i)    is within 25 percent of the sling width of the edge, or

                                          (ii)    covers 25 percent of the sling width,

                                 (e)    the warp thread damage is as deep as the sling is thick

                                           (i)    in an area that is within 25 percent of the sling width of the edge, or

                                          (ii)    over an area that is more than 12.5 percent of the width of the sling;

                                 (f)    weft thread damage allows warp threads to separate over an area that is wider than 25 percent of the sling width and longer than twice the sling width.

305(2)  An employer must ensure that a synthetic fibre web sling is permanently removed from service if

                                 (a)    part of the sling is melted, charred or damaged by chemicals,

                                 (b)    stitches in load bearing splices are broken or worn, or

                                 (c)    end fittings are excessively pitted or corroded, cracked, distorted or broken.

305(3)  An employer must ensure that a synthetic fibre web sling is permanently removed from service if it is damaged in such a way that the total effect of the damage on the sling is approximately the same as the effect of any one of the types of damage referred to in subsections (1) or (2).

305(4)  An employer must ensure that a synthetic fibre web sling that is permanently removed from service under this section is physically altered to prevent its further use as a sling.

Wire rope

306(1)  An employer must ensure that wire rope is permanently removed from service if

                                 (a)    wear or corrosion affects individual wires over more than one third of the original diameter of the rope,

                                 (b)    there is evidence that the rope structure is distorted because of bulging, kinking, bird‑caging or any other form of damage,

                                 (c)    there is evidence of heat or arc damage, or

                                 (d)    the normal rope diameter is reduced, from any cause, by more than

                                           (i)    0.4 millimetres if the normal rope diameter is 8 millimetres or less,

                                          (ii)    1 millimetre if the normal rope diameter is more than 8 millimetres and less than 20 millimetres,

                                         (iii)    2 millimetres if the normal rope diameter is 20 millimetres or more and less than 30 millimetres, and

                                         (iv)    3 millimetres if the normal rope diameter is 30 millimetres or more.

306(2)  An employer must ensure that a running wire rope is permanently removed from service

                                 (a)    if six or more randomly distributed wires are broken in one rope lay, or

                                 (b)    if three or more wires are broken in one strand in one rope lay.

306(3)  An employer must ensure that a stationary wire rope such as a guy line is permanently removed from service

                                 (a)    if three or more wires are broken in one rope lay in sections between end connections, or

                                 (b)    if more than one wire is broken within one rope lay of an end connection.

306(4)  An employer must ensure that wire rope that does not rotate because of its construction is permanently removed from service

                                 (a)    if there is evidence of the damage referred to in subsection (1),

                                 (b)    if two randomly distributed wires are broken in six rope diameters, or

                                 (c)    if four randomly distributed wires are broken in 30 rope diameters.

Metal mesh slings

307   An employer must ensure that a metal mesh sling is removed from service if

                                 (a)    there is a broken weld or a broken brazed joint along the sling edge,

                                 (b)    a wire in any part of the mesh is broken,

                                 (c)    corrosion has reduced a wire diameter by 15 percent,

                                 (d)    abrasion has reduced a wire diameter by 25 percent,

                                 (e)    there is a loss of flexibility because the mesh is distorted,

                                 (f)    the depth of the slot is increased by more than 10 percent because the choker fitting is distorted,

                                 (g)    the width of the eye opening is decreased by more than 10 percent because either end fitting is distorted,

                                 (h)    the original cross‑sectional area of metal is reduced by 15 percent or more at any point around the hook opening or end fitting,

                                  (i)    either end fitting is distorted, or

                                  (j)    an end fitting is cracked.

Electric arc damage

308   An employer must ensure that a component of rigging that has been contacted by an electric arc is removed from service unless a professional engineer certifies that it is safe to use.

Damaged hooks

309   An employer must ensure that a worn, damaged or deformed hook is permanently removed from service if the wear or damage exceeds the specifications allowed by the manufacturer.

Part 22
Safeguards

Safeguards

310(1)  Repealed

310(2)  An employer must provide safeguards if a worker may accidentally, or through the work process, come into contact with

                                 (a)    moving parts of machinery or equipment,

                                 (b)    points of machinery or equipment at which material is cut, shaped or bored,

                                 (c)    surfaces with temperatures that may cause skin to freeze, burn or blister,

                                 (d)    energized electrical cables,

                                 (e)    debris, material or objects thrown from machinery or equipment,

                                 (f)    material being fed into or removed from process machinery or equipment,

                                 (g)    machinery or equipment that may be hazardous due to its operation, or

                                 (h)    any other hazard.

310(2.1)  Repealed

310(3)  Subsection (2) does not apply to machinery that already has a safeguard that

                                 (a)    automatically stops the machinery if a worker comes into contact with a moving part or a point at which material is cut, shaped or bored,

                                 (b)    prevents a worker from coming into contact with a hazard referred to in subsection (2), or

                                 (c)    eliminates the hazards referred to in subsection (2) before a worker can be injured.

310(4)  If an employer determines that an effective safeguard cannot be provided in the circumstances, the employer must ensure that an alternative mechanism or system or a change in work procedure is put into place to protect workers from being exposed to hazards that exist if there is no safeguard.

310(5)  An alternative mechanism or system or a change in work procedure put into place under subsection (4) must offer protection to workers that is equal to or greater than the protection from a safeguard referred to in subsection (3).

310(6)  An employer must place warning signs on machinery that starts automatically

                                 (a)    on a clearly visible location at a point of access to the machinery, and

                                 (b)    that give clear instructions to workers on the nature of the hazard.

Tampering with safeguards

311(1)  A person must not remove a safeguard from a machine that is operating if the safeguard is not designed to be removed when the machine is operating.

311(2)  A person must not remove a safeguard or make it ineffective unless removing it or making it ineffective is necessary to perform maintenance, tests, repairs, adjustments or other tasks on equipment.

311(3)  If a worker removes a safeguard or makes it ineffective, the worker must ensure that

                                 (a)    alternative protective measures are in place until the safeguard is replaced,

                                 (b)    the safeguard is replaced immediately after the task is completed, and

                                 (c)    the safeguard functions properly once replaced.

311(4)  If a safeguard for machinery is removed or made ineffective and the machinery cannot be directly controlled by a worker, the worker who removes the safeguard or makes it ineffective must lock out  or lock out and tag the machinery or render it inoperative.

No safeguards

312(1)  Despite other sections in this Part, an employer may allow the machinery to be operated without the safeguards if

                                 (a)    safeguards are normally required by this Code for machinery, and

                                 (b)    the machinery cannot accommodate or operate with these safeguards.

312(2)  If machinery in subsection (1) is operated without safeguards, the employer must ensure workers operating or in the vicinity of the machine wear personal protective equipment that

                                 (a)    is appropriate to the hazard, and

                                 (b)    offers protection equal to or greater than that offered by the safeguards.

Building shafts

313(1)  An employer must ensure that if a work platform is necessary to ensure the safety of workers in a building shaft, there is

                                 (a)    a main work platform that is completely decked and designed to support any anticipated load, and

                                 (b)    a second platform not more than 4 metres below the main work platform.

313(2)  An employer must ensure that if there is no work platform at a doorway or opening to a building shaft

                                 (a)    the doorway or opening is enclosed,

                                 (b)    the enclosure is not less than 2 metres high, and

                                 (c)    there is an access door opening out from the enclosed area.

313(3)  An employer must ensure that, while a building shaft is being constructed, at least one warning sign indicating the presence of an open building shaft is placed at each point of entry to the shaft.

Covering openings

314(1)  An employer must ensure that an opening or hole through which a worker can fall is protected by

                                 (a)    a securely attached cover designed to support an anticipated load, or

                                 (b)    guardrails and toe boards.

314(2)  If a person removes a cover, guardrail or toe board, or any part thereof, protecting an opening or hole for any reason, an employer must ensure a temporary cover or other means of protection replaces it immediately.

314(3)  If a temporary cover is used to protect an opening or hole, an employer must ensure a warning sign or marking clearly indicating the nature of the hazard

                                 (a)    is posted near or fixed on the cover, and

                                 (b)    is not removed unless another effective means of protection is immediately provided.

Guardrails

315(1)  An employer must ensure that a guardrail required by this Code

                                 (a)    has a horizontal top member installed between 920 millimetres and 1070 millimetres above the base of the guardrail,

                                 (b)    has a horizontal, intermediate member spaced mid‑way between the top member and the base,

                                 (c)    has vertical members at both ends of the horizontal members with intermediate vertical supports that are not more than 3 metres apart at their centres, and

                                 (d)    is constructed of lumber that is 38 millimetres by 89 millimetres or of material with properties the same as or better than those of lumber.

315(2)  Despite subsection (1), a temporary guardrail does not require a horizontal intermediate member if it has a substantial barrier positioned within the space bounded by the horizontal top member, toe board and vertical members, that prevents a worker from falling through the space.

315(3)  An employer must ensure that a guardrail is secured so that it cannot move in any direction if it is struck or if any point on it comes into contact with a worker, materials or equipment.

Hoppers, bins and chutes

316   If a worker can access materials in hoppers, bins or chutes, an employer must ensure the hoppers, bins or chutes have horizontal bars, screens or equally effective safeguards that prevent a worker from falling into the hoppers, bins or chutes.

Machine failure

317   If a worker may be injured if a machine fails, an employer must install safeguards on the machine strong enough to contain or deflect flying particles of material, broken parts of machinery and a shock wave.

Protection from falling objects

318(1)  An employer must ensure that workers in a work area where there may be falling objects are protected from the falling objects by an overhead safeguard.

318(2)  An employer must ensure that a safeguard used under subsection (1) is designed to withstand the shock loads from objects that may fall onto it.

318(3)  Despite subsection (1), if the danger from falling objects is in a location in a work site where workers go intermittently or incidentally to their regular duties, an employer may place appropriate and adequate warning signs, horns, flashing lights or similar devices at the location to warn workers of the hazard.

318(4)  An employer must ensure that a safeguard used on a hoist or scaffold under subsection (1)

                                 (a)    is made of wire mesh or an enclosure material that is equally or more efficient at containing equipment and materials,

                                 (b)    is not less than 1 metre high from the floor, platform or working level of the safeguard, and

                                 (c)    encloses all sides of a cantilever hoist platform or skip, except the side adjacent to the building.

318(5)  If the material being hoisted or lowered is of a kind that prevents the sides of a cantilever hoist platform or skip from being enclosed as required by subsection (4), an employer must provide another effective alternative safeguard against falling materials for the workers.

318(6)  An employer must ensure that a safeguard around the surface opening of an underground shaft serving a tunnel

                                 (a)    is made of wire mesh or an enclosure material that is equally or more effective at containing equipment and materials, and

                                 (b)    is not less than 1 metre high from the surface.

318(7)  An employer must ensure that a safeguard is installed on all sides of

                                 (a)    the cage of a building shaft hoist or a tower hoist, or

                                 (b)    a hoist cage in an underground shaft serving a tunnel.

318(8)  An employer must ensure that a safeguard used on a cage under subsection (7) is made of

                                 (a)    wire mesh, or

                                 (b)    an enclosure material that is equally or more effective at containing equipment and materials and at protecting workers from hazards associated with the movement of a cage in a shaft.

Push stick or block

319   If a worker may be injured while feeding materials into cutting or shaping machinery, an employer must ensure the machine worker uses a push stick, push block or other similar means of feeding the material.

Safety nets

320(1)  An employer must ensure that a safety net

                                 (a)    meets the requirements of ANSI Standard A10.11‑1989 (R1998), Construction and Demolition Operations – Personnel and Debris Nets,

                                 (b)    has safety hooks or shackles of drawn, rolled or forged steel with an ultimate tensile strength of not less than 22.2 kilonewtons,

                                 (c)    has joints between net panels capable of developing the full strength of the web,

                                 (d)    extends not less than 2.4 metres beyond the work area,

                                 (e)    extends not more than 6 metres below the work area, and

                                 (f)    is installed and maintained so that the maximum deflection under impact load does not allow any part of the net to touch another surface.

320(2)  An employer must ensure that the supporting structure to which a personnel safety net is attached is certified by a professional engineer as being capable of withstanding any load the net is likely to impose on the structure.

320(3)  Subsection (1) does not apply to properly maintained rescue nets used by fire fighters and other emergency services personnel.

Toe boards

321(1)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a toe board required by this Code is not less than 140 millimetres in height above the surface of the work area, and

                                 (b)    the space between the bottom of the toe board and the surface of the work area is not more than 6 millimetres high.

321(2)  An employer must ensure that toe boards are installed at the outer edge above the work area if a worker may be under a permanent floor, platform, mezzanine, walkway, ramp, runway or other permanent surface where

                                 (a)    guardrails are installed, or

                                 (b)    materials can fall more than 1.8 metres.

321(3)  An employer must ensure that toe boards are installed at the outer edge above the work area of temporary scaffolding or a temporary work platform if materials can fall more than 3.5 metres.

321(4)  An employer must ensure that toe boards are installed around the top of a pit containing a machine with exposed rotating parts if workers may be working in the pit.

321(5)  Subsection (1) does not apply to

                                 (a)    the entrance of a loading or unloading area if the employer takes other precautions to ensure that materials do not fall from the permanent surface, or

                                 (b)    the entrance to a ladder.

Wire mesh

322   An employer must ensure that wire mesh used in a safeguard required by this Code is

                                 (a)    fabricated of wire at least 1.6 millimetres in diameter, and

                                 (b)    spaced to reject a ball 40 millimetres in diameter.

Part 23
Scaffolds and Temporary
Work Platforms

Scaffolds

CSA Standard applies

323   Subject to sections 324 and 325, an employer must ensure that scaffolds erected to provide working platforms during the construction, alteration, repair or demolition of buildings and other structures comply with CSA Standard CAN/CSA‑S269.2‑M87 (R2003), Access Scaffolding for Construction Purposes.

Design

324(1)  An employer must ensure that a single pole or double pole scaffold is

                                 (a)    supported against lateral movement by adequate bracing,

                                 (b)    anchored by one tie‑in for each 4.6 metre vertical interval and one tie‑in for each 6.4 metre horizontal interval,

                                 (c)    anchored by one tie‑in for each 3 metre vertical interval and one tie‑in for each 3 metre horizontal interval if the scaffold is hoarded, and

                                 (d)    set plumb on a base plate, jackscrew or other load dispersing device on a stable surface.

324(2)  An employer must ensure that ropes or wire ropes used in scaffolding are

                                 (a)    protected against fraying or other damage, and

                                 (b)    made of heat or chemical resistant material if there is a possibility of exposure to heat or chemicals.

324(3)  An employer must ensure that wooden scaffolds are constructed of unpainted dressed lumber.

324(4)  Despite subsection (1)(c), an employer must ensure that hoarded masonry walk‑through scaffold frames are

                                 (a)    anchored by not less than one tie‑in for each 9 square metres of hoarding surface area, and

                                 (b)    have vertical tie‑ins spaced at least 2 metres apart but not more than 3 metres apart.

324(5)  If scaffolding or a temporary work platform can be damaged by powered mobile equipment or a vehicle contacting it, an employer must take reasonable measures to protect the scaffolding or temporary work platform from being contacted.

AR 87/2009 s324;56/2018

Load

325(1)  An employer must ensure that a scaffold is designed and constructed to support at least 4 times the load that may be imposed on it.

325(2)  An employer must ensure that the load to which a scaffold is subjected never exceeds the equivalent of one‑quarter of the load for which it is designed.

325(3)  An employer must ensure that a scaffold used to carry the equivalent of an evenly distributed load of more than 367 kilograms per square metre is

                                 (a)    designed and certified by a professional engineer, and

                                 (b)    constructed, maintained and used in accordance with the certified specifications.

325(4)  Subsection (3) applies to a type of scaffold that is not otherwise specifically referred to in this Code.

325(5)  An employer must ensure that all workers on a scaffold are informed of the maximum load that the scaffold is permitted to carry.

Tagging requirements

326(1)  An employer must ensure that a scaffold is colour coded using tags at each point of entry indicating its status and condition as follows:

                                 (a)    a green tag with “Safe for Use”, or similar wording, to indicate it is safe for use;

                                 (b)    a yellow tag with “Caution: Potential or Unusual Hazard”, or similar wording, to indicate the presence of a potential or unusual hazard;

                                 (c)    a red tag with “Unsafe for Use”, or similar wording, to indicate it is not safe to use.

326(2)  An employer must ensure that a bracket scaffold, double‑pole scaffold, needle‑beam scaffold, outrigger scaffold, single‑pole scaffold, suspended scaffold or swingstage scaffold erected but not immediately put into service, or not used for more than 21 consecutive calendar days, has a red tag at each point of entry until it is inspected and tagged by a competent worker for use.

326(3)  An employer must ensure that a bracket scaffold, double‑pole scaffold, needle‑beam scaffold, outrigger scaffold, single‑pole scaffold, suspended scaffold or swingstage scaffold is inspected and tagged by a competent worker before it is used for the first time and at intervals of not more than 21 calendar days while workers work from the scaffold or materials are stored on it.

326(4)  A tag attached to a scaffold under this section expires 21 calendar days after the date of the inspection it records.

326(5)  A tag required by this section must include

                                 (a)    the duty rating of the scaffold,

                                 (b)    the date on which the scaffold was last inspected,

                                 (c)    the name of the competent worker who last inspected the scaffold,

                                 (d)    any precautions to be taken while working on the scaffold, and

                                 (e)    the expiry date of the tag.

326(6)  A worker must not use a scaffold if it has

                                 (a)    a red tag,

                                 (b)    a green or yellow tag that has expired, or

                                 (c)    no tag at all.

326(7)  Subsection (6) does not apply to a competent worker who is involved in the erection, inspection or dismantling of a scaffold.

326(8)  In the case of a farming and ranching operation, an employer may perform a hazard assessment, as set out in Part 2, instead of complying with subsections (1) through (7).

AR 87/2009 s326;152/2018

Vertical ladder on scaffold

327(1)  An employer must ensure that a vertical ladder that gives access to a working level of a scaffold is used by a worker only to move up or down between levels of the scaffold.

327(2)  Workers moving between levels of a scaffold on a vertical ladder

                                 (a)    must not extend a part of their body, other than an arm, beyond the side rails of the ladder, and

                                 (b)    must maintain a three‑point stance on the ladder at all times.

327(3)  The employer must ensure that a ladder attached to a scaffold and providing access to a working level of a scaffold

                                 (a)    is securely fastened to the scaffold,

                                 (b)    does not lean away from the scaffold,

                                 (c)    extends at least 1 metre above the uppermost working level of the scaffold,

                                 (d)    has rungs that are uniformly spaced at a centre‑to‑centre distance of 250 millimetres to 305 millimetres,

                                 (e)    has a maximum unbroken length of 9.1 metres measured from the ground or between working levels, and

                                 (f)    is equipped with a ladder cage that begins within 2.4 metres of the ground or working level if the ladder is more than 6.1 metres in height.

327(4)  The employer must ensure that the ladder cage required by subsection (3)(f) is

                                 (a)    circular with an inside diameter that measures no more than 760 millimetres, or

                                 (b)    square with inside dimensions that measure no more than 760 millimetres by 760 millimetres.

327(5)  Despite subsections (3)(e) and (3)(f), the ladder may have a maximum unbroken length of more than 9.1 metres and does not require a ladder cage if a fall protection system complying with Part 9 is used.

Working from a ladder

328(1)  An employer must ensure that no worker performs work from a ladder that is used to give access to the working levels of a scaffold.

328(2)  A worker must not perform work from a ladder that is used to give access to the working levels of a scaffold.

Scaffold planks

329(1)  An employer must ensure that a commercially manufactured scaffold plank is used, stored, inspected and maintained according to the manufacturer’s specifications.

329(2)  An employer must ensure that a solid sawn lumber scaffold plank is

                                 (a)    graded as scaffold grade or better, and

                                 (b)    sized 51 millimetres by 254 millimetres.

329(3)  An employer must ensure that a solid sawn lumber scaffold plank

                                 (a)    is used, stored, inspected and maintained according to the manufacturer’s specifications, or

                                 (b)    if there are no manufacturer’s specifications, is made of at least number one grade lumber that is 51 millimetres by 254 millimetres with a wane limited to 20 percent of the width of the wide face of the plank and the warp limited to ensure a flat surface.

329(4)  An employer must ensure that a scaffold plank

                                 (a)    is visually inspected by a competent worker before it is installed in a scaffold,

                                 (b)    is subjected to and passes a load test before it is installed in a scaffold if a visual inspection reveals damage that could affect its strength or function,

                                 (c)    extends not less than 150 millimetres and not more than 300 millimetres beyond a ledger, and

                                 (d)    is secured to prevent movement in any direction that may create a danger to a worker.

329(5)  Despite subsection (4)(c), an employer must ensure that an overlapping scaffold plank extends not less than 300 millimetres beyond a ledger.

Scaffold platform

330(1)  An employer must ensure that the platform of a scaffold

                                 (a)    is a minimum width of 500 millimetres, except that a nominal 300 millimetre wide platform may be used with ladderjacks, pump jacks or similar systems,

                                 (b)    does not have an open space between the platform and a structure that is greater than 250 millimetres in width,

                                 (c)    if not level, is designed to ensure adequate footing for workers using the platform, and

                                 (d)    is continuous around obstructions that would create openings into or through which a worker might step or fall through.

330(2)  Repealed

Metal scaffolding

331   An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    metal scaffolding is erected, used, inspected, maintained and dismantled in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, and

                                 (b)    the structural parts of metal scaffolding are securely fastened together as required by the manufacturer.

Bracket scaffolds

332(1)  An employer must ensure that a bracket scaffold

                                 (a)    is constructed, installed and used in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer,

                                 (b)    is securely attached to the support wall in a manner that prevents the bracket from dislodging, and

                                 (c)    is used only as a light duty scaffold.

332(2)  An employer must ensure that the brackets on a bracket scaffold are spaced at intervals of not more than 3 metres.

Double‑pole scaffolds

333(1)  An employer must ensure that uprights and ledgers

                                 (a)    of light duty double‑pole scaffolds are spaced not more than 3 metres apart, and

                                 (b)    of heavy duty double‑pole scaffolds are spaced not more than 2.3 metres apart.

333(2)  An employer must ensure that the dimensions of parts of wooden double‑pole scaffolds are not less than those specified in Schedule 6, Tables 1, 2, 3 and 4.

Free‑standing or rolling scaffolds

334(1)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    the height of a free‑standing or rolling scaffold is not more than 3 times its smallest base dimension,

                                 (b)    if outriggers are used to attain the 3 to 1 ratio, the outriggers are firmly attached and ensure the stability of the scaffold,

                                 (c)    if a vehicle is used instead of scaffold wheels to form a rolling scaffold, all parts of the scaffold are securely fastened together and the scaffold is securely attached to the vehicle,

                                 (d)    if outriggers are required to maintain the stability of a vehicle‑mounted scaffold, the outriggers are securely attached to the frame of the vehicle, and

                                 (e)    a rolling scaffold is equipped with locking wheels or there are blocks for the wheels.

334(2)  A worker must not remain on a rolling scaffold while it is being moved unless

                                 (a)    the height of its work platform is not more than twice its smallest base dimension, and

                                 (b)    the surface over which it travels is firm, level and free of hazards that may cause the scaffold to topple.

334(3)  A worker using a rolling scaffold must engage the wheel locking devices or block the scaffold against movement while the scaffold is stationary and a worker is working from the scaffold.

Half‑horse scaffolds

335(1)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a half‑horse scaffold is used only as a light duty scaffold,

                                 (b)    half‑horse scaffold ledgers are not more than 3 metres apart, and

                                 (c)    half‑horse scaffold legs are not spliced or more than 5 metres high.

335(2)  An employer must ensure that the parts of a half‑horse scaffold are not less than the lumber sizes specified in Schedule 6, Tables 5 or 6.

335(3)  If a part of a half‑horse scaffold is not made of lumber, an employer must ensure that the part is made of a material that has properties equal to or greater than those of lumber.

Ladderjack scaffolds

336(1)  An employer must ensure that ladders used for ladderjack scaffolds are

                                 (a)    erected in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, or

                                 (b)    if there are no manufacturer’s specifications, are not more than 3 metres apart.

336(2)  An employer must ensure that brackets in a ladderjack scaffold are designed to

                                 (a)    be supported by the side rails of the ladder, or

                                 (b)    have at least 90 millimetres of width resting on the ladder rung.

336(3)  An employer must ensure that a ladderjack scaffold is not more than 5 metres high.

336(4)  An employer must ensure that there are not more than two workers at a time on a ladderjack scaffold.

336(5)  Despite sections 329 and 330, an employer may use a single commercially manufactured extendable painter’s plank or a commercially manufactured aluminum or laminated plank on a ladderjack scaffold.

Needle‑beam scaffolds

337(1)  An employer must ensure that beams supporting a needle‑beam scaffold

                                 (a)    are constructed of lumber, or a material that has properties equal to or greater than those of lumber,

                                 (b)    are not less than 89 millimetres by 140 millimetres, and

                                 (c)    are placed on their edge.

337(2)  An employer must ensure that planks forming the working platform of a needle‑beam scaffold are pinned to prevent shifting.

337(3)  An employer must ensure that ropes supporting a needle‑beam scaffold have

                                 (a)    a breaking strength of at least 39 kilonewtons, and

                                 (b)    a diameter of not less than 16 millimetres.

337(4)  An employer must ensure that beam ends of a needle‑beam scaffold are provided with stops to prevent the ropes from slipping off the beam.

Outrigger scaffolds

338(1)  This section applies to outrigger scaffolds, including suspended outrigger scaffolds.

338(2)  If a reference in this section is made to lumber, a material that has properties equal to or greater than those of lumber may be used in its place.

338(3)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    thrustouts are constructed of lumber that is 89 millimetres by 140 millimetres and placed on their edge,

                                 (b)    thrustouts do not extend more than 2 metres beyond the edge of the bearing surface,

                                 (c)    thrustouts are securely braced at the fulcrum point against movement or upset,

                                 (d)    the inboard ends of thrustouts are securely anchored against horizontal or vertical movement or upset,

                                 (e)    the inboard portion from the fulcrum point to the point of anchorage is not less than 1.5 times the length of the outboard portion,

                                 (f)    the maximum distance between thrustouts is 2.3 metres,

                                 (g)    if a working platform is suspended or thrust out, the platform is

                                           (i)    supported by vertical lumber hangers that are 38 millimetres by 140 millimetres or larger and not more than 3 metres long secured to the side of each thrustout and extending at least 300 millimetres above the top of each thrustout, and

                                          (ii)    secured to a block that rests on the top edge of each thrustout as an additional support,

                                 (h)    a suspended platform is supported by lumber beams that are 38 millimetres by 140 millimetres and that are

                                           (i)    secured to the vertical hangers at least 300 millimetres above the bottom of the hangers, and

                                          (ii)    resting on blocks that are secured to the side of the hangers below each beam as an additional support,

                                  (i)    working platforms are completely planked between the hangers, and

                                  (j)    a suspended platform is braced to prevent swaying.

338(4)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    counterweights are not used,

                                 (b)    stops to prevent lateral movement of the hangers are fixed to

                                           (i)    the thrustout and block referred to in subsection 3(g)(ii),

                                          (ii)    the ledgers and the blocks referred to in subsection (3)(h), and

                                 (c)    materials are not stored on outrigger scaffolds.

Roofing brackets

339   An employer must ensure that a roofing bracket is

                                 (a)    constructed to support the loads that may be put on it,

                                 (b)    provided with effective non‑slip devices, and

                                 (c)    secured to the roof with nails.

Single‑pole scaffolds

340   An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a wooden single‑pole scaffold is used only as a light duty scaffold and is not more than 9 metres in height,

                                 (b)    the uprights on a wooden single‑pole scaffold are spaced not more than 3 metres apart, and

                                 (c)    the dimensions and/or strength of members of single‑pole scaffolds are not less than those specified in Schedule 6, Tables 7 and 8.

Suspended scaffolds

341(1)  This section applies to suspended scaffolds other than suspended outrigger scaffolds or suspended swingstage scaffolds.

341(2)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a commercially manufactured suspended scaffold is erected, used, operated and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, and

                                 (b)    a suspended scaffold that is not commercially manufactured is designed and certified by a professional engineer.

341(3)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    the upper end of the suspension rope terminates in a spliced loop in which a steel thimble or eye is securely inserted,

                                 (b)    the suspension rope is secured to a thrustout by a bolt passing through the shackle, the steel thimble or the eye and the bolt is drawn up tightly to the end plate of the shackle by a securing nut,

                                 (c)    the planks of the platform are laid tightly together and overlap the supporting ledgers at each end of the scaffold by at least 300 millimetres, and

                                 (d)    working platforms are not less than 1 metre wide.

341(4)  An employer must ensure that all parts of a suspended scaffold are inspected daily.

341(5)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    thrustouts are securely anchored to the building,

                                 (b)    counterweights are not used for anchoring a thrustout, and

                                 (c)    a stop bolt is placed at the outer end of each thrustout.

341(6)  An employer must ensure that the working parts of a hoisting mechanism are left exposed so that

                                 (a)    defective parts of the mechanism can be easily detected, and

                                 (b)    an irregularity in the operation of the mechanism can be easily detected.

341(7)  An employer must ensure that a suspended scaffold platform has an enclosure that

                                 (a)    is on the three sides of the platform that are not adjacent to the building,

                                 (b)    is made of wire mesh that complies with section 322 or another material that is at least as effective at containing materials or equipment, and

                                 (c)    extends not less than 1 metre above the platform.

Swingstage scaffolds

342(1)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a commercially manufactured swingstage scaffold is erected, used, operated and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer,

                                 (b)    a swingstage scaffold that is not commercially manufactured is designed and certified by a professional engineer, and

                                 (c)    operating procedures are developed for a swingstage scaffold referred to in clause (b).

342(2)  If it is necessary for the safe operation of a swingstage scaffold with a platform, an employer must ensure that the platform is designed to prevent the swingstage scaffold from swinging or swaying away from the building or structure.

Requirements for swingstage scaffold

343(1)  An employer must ensure that a swingstage scaffold is used only as a light duty scaffold.

343(2)  An employer must ensure that a swingstage scaffold is suspended by at least two upper attachment points placed so that the suspension ropes are parallel.

343(3)  An employer must ensure that a platform is at least 500 millimetres wide and fastened to the stirrups.

343(4)  An employer must ensure that a platform is equipped with rollers or fenders that bear against the side of the building or structure to hold the platform at a distance from the wall sufficient to avoid an obstacle, but not so far as to allow a worker to fall through the space between the wall and the platform.

343(5)  An employer must ensure that a thrustout, clamp or parapet hook is tied back or otherwise secured to a solid part of the structure and cannot move or be dislodged.

343(6)  An employer must ensure that counterweights

                                 (a)    are firmly attached to the thrustouts,

                                 (b)    are heavy enough to counterbalance four times the maximum weight likely to be on the scaffold, and

                                 (c)    do not consist of bagged or loose material.

343(7)  An employer must ensure that power units on a swingstage scaffold are equipped with

                                 (a)    manually operated constant pressure controls, and

                                 (b)    positive drives for raising and lowering the scaffold.

343(8)  An employer must ensure that a swingstage scaffold platform has an enclosure that

                                 (a)    is on the three sides of the platform that are not adjacent to the building,

                                 (b)    is made of wire mesh that complies with section 322 or another material that is at least as effective at containing materials or equipment, and

                                 (c)    extends not less than 1 metre above the platform.

Safety on swingstage scaffolds

344(1)  An employer must ensure that if workers are required to be on a swingstage scaffold, the hoisting equipment is equipped with automatically operating locking mechanisms so that the suspension ropes cannot slip or run free.

344(2)  An employer must ensure that if workers are required to be on a manually operated swingstage scaffold,

                                 (a)    the hoisting mechanism is securely locked in a positive drive position, and

                                 (b)    the scaffold has a secondary anti‑fall device that connects the scaffold to the suspension rope at a point above the hoisting mechanism.

344(3)  An employer must ensure that a powered swingstage scaffold has a manually operated secondary mechanism or an escape device, other than the vertical lifeline used for fall protection, if workers cannot reach a safe exit when there is a mechanical failure or power failure.

344(4)  An employer must ensure that a worker on the stage of a swingstage scaffold can use the manually operated secondary mechanism or escape device referred to in subsection (3) to move the scaffold to a point at which the worker can exit safely.

344(5)  An employer must ensure that a suspension rope is long enough to reach the next working surface below the scaffold.

344(6)  An employer must ensure that the end of a suspension rope is doubled back and held securely by a cable clamp so that the hoisting machine cannot run off the end of the rope.

344(7)  An employer must ensure that two or more swingstage scaffolds are not linked together by bridging the distance between them.

Workers on swingstage scaffolds

345(1)  Before starting to work on a swingstage scaffold, a worker must inspect the scaffold to ensure that

                                 (a)    the thrustouts or parapet hooks are secured in accordance with section 343, and

                                 (b)    counterweights meet the requirements of section 343.

345(2)  A worker on a swingstage scaffold must ensure that

                                 (a)    all ropes from the scaffold that extend to the ground or a landing are prevented from tangling, and

                                 (b)    when the scaffold is being moved up or down on its suspension ropes, the stage is not out of level by more than 10 percent of its length.

345(3)  A person on a swingstage scaffold must

                                 (a)    remain between the stirrups at all times,

                                 (b)    not bridge the distance between the scaffold and any other scaffold,

                                 (c)    not use a vertical lifeline used for fall protection as a means of entering or leaving a swingstage, and

                                 (d)    not use bagged or loose materials as counterweights on the scaffold.

345(4)  An employer must ensure that if a worker may fall 3 metres or more while working from a suspended swingstage scaffold, the worker’s personal fall arrest system is connected to a vertical lifeline.

345(5)  Despite subsection (4), an employer may allow a worker using a swingstage scaffold to connect a personal fall arrest system to a horizontal lifeline or anchorage on the swingstage scaffold if the failure of one suspension line will not substantially alter the position of the swingstage scaffold.

Elevating Platforms and
Aerial Devices

Worker safety

346(1)  An employer must ensure that a worker is not travelling in a basket, bucket, platform or other elevated or aerial device that is moving on a road or work site if road conditions, traffic, overhead wires, cables or other obstructions create a danger to the worker.

346(2)  A person must not travel in a basket, bucket, platform or other elevated or aerial device that is moving on a road or work site if road conditions, traffic, overhead wires, cables or other obstructions create a danger to the person.

Standards

347(1)  An employer must ensure that a self‑propelled work platform manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 with a boom‑supported elevating platform that telescopes, articulates, rotates or extends beyond the base dimensions of the platform meets the requirements of

                                 (a)    CSA Standard CAN/CSA‑B354.4‑02, Self‑Propelled Boom‑Supported Elevating Work Platforms, or

                                 (b)    ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.5‑2006, Boom‑Supported Elevating Work Platforms.

347(2)  Subsection (1) does not apply to a work platform mounted on a motor vehicle.

347(3)  An employer must ensure that a self‑propelled integral chassis elevating work platform manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 with a platform that cannot be positioned laterally completely beyond the base and with its primary functions controlled from the platform meets the requirements of

                                 (a)    CSA Standard CAN/CSA‑B354.2‑01 (R2006), Self‑Propelled Elevating Work Platforms, or

                                 (b)    ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.6‑2006, Self‑Propelled Elevating Work Platforms.

347(4)  An employer must ensure that a manually propelled, integral chassis elevating work platform manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 with a platform that cannot be positioned laterally completely beyond the base, that may be adjusted manually or using power and that must not be occupied when moved horizontally meets the requirements of

                                 (a)    CSA Standard CAN3‑B354.1‑04, Portable elevating work platforms, or

                                 (b)    ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.3‑2006, Manually Propelled Elevating Aerial Platforms.

347(5)  An employer must ensure that a telescopic aerial device, aerial ladder, articulating aerial device, vertical tower, material‑lifting aerial device or a combination of any of them, when mounted on a motor vehicle, whether operated manually or using power, meets the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA‑C225‑00 (R2005), Vehicle‑Mounted Aerial Devices.

347(6)  An employer must ensure that a mast climbing elevating work platform that may be adjusted manually or using power meets the requirements of ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.9‑1993, Mast‑Climbing Work Platforms.

347(7)  An employer must ensure that a vehicle‑mounted bridge inspection and maintenance elevating work platform meets the requirements of ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.8‑1993 (R1998), Vehicle‑Mounted Bridge Inspection and Maintenance Devices.

347(8)  An employer must ensure that an order picker meets the requirements of ASME Standard B56.1‑2000, Safety Standard for Low Lift and High Lift Trucks.

347(9)  Repealed AR 56/2018 s22.

AR 87/2009 s347;56/2018

Permanent suspension powered work platforms

348(1)  An employer must ensure that the platform of a permanent suspension powered work platform

                                 (a)    is constructed, installed, operated, tested, inspected, maintained, altered and repaired in accordance with CSA Standard CAN/CSA‑Z271‑98 (R2004), Safety Code for Suspended Elevating Platforms, or

                                 (b)    if it was installed before April 30, 2004, is certified by a professional engineer.

348(2)  For the purposes of subsection (1), the “rated capacity” in CSA Standard CAN/CSA‑Z271‑98 (R2004) is to be taken to mean the total weight of

                                 (a)    workers and hand tools, with a minimum aggregate weight of 115 kilograms per worker, and

                                 (b)    water and other equipment that the work platform is designed to lift at the rated speed.

Fork‑mounted work platforms

349(1)  An employer must ensure that a cage or work platform mounted on the forks of powered mobile equipment and intended to only support material is so designed and constructed that it is securely attached to the lifting carriage or forks of the powered mobile equipment, so that the cage or platform cannot accidentally move laterally or vertically and so that the powered mobile equipment cannot tip.

349(2)  An employer must ensure that a work platform mounted on the forks of powered mobile equipment and intended to support a worker

                                 (a)    is commercially manufactured or, if not commercially manufactured, is designed and certified by a professional engineer,

                                 (b)    has guardrails and toe boards, and

                                 (c)    has a screen or similar barrier that prevents a worker from touching any drive mechanism.

349(3)  An employer must ensure that the operator of the powered mobile equipment remains at the controls while a worker is on the elevated fork‑mounted work platform.

349(4)  A person must not be on a fork‑mounted work platform while the powered mobile equipment to which the platform is attached is moving horizontally.

Suspended man baskets

350   Moved to section 75.1

Boatswain’s chairs

351(1)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a commercially manufactured boatswain’s chair is assembled, used and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, or

                                 (b)    a boatswain’s chair that is not commercially manufactured is designed and certified by a professional engineer.

351(2)  An employer must ensure that a boatswain’s chair provides stable support for the user.

351(3)  An employer must ensure that a rope used to suspend a boatswain’s chair is

                                 (a)    made of synthetic fibre with a breaking strength of at least 27 kilonewtons, and

                                 (b)    is compatible for use with the rigging hardware in the suspension system.

351(4)  An employer must ensure that a wire rope used to suspend a boatswain’s chair is

                                 (a)    of a type recommended for suspending boatswain’s chairs by the rope manufacturer, and

                                 (b)    is suitable for the hoist being used.

Temporary supporting structures

352(1)  An employer must ensure that a temporary supporting structure and every part of it, including metal scaffold components, are designed, constructed and braced in accordance with CSA Standard S269.1‑1975 (R2003), Falsework for Construction Purposes.

352(2)  Subsection (3) applies to a temporary supporting structure unless the requirements of CSA Standard S269.1‑1975 (R2003), Falsework for Construction Purposes are more stringent.

352(3)  An employer must ensure that a temporary supporting structure is certified by a professional engineer if the temporary supporting structure

                                 (a)    consists of shoring that is more than 3.7 metres in height,

                                 (b)    may transmit loads to another part of the structure that may not provide adequate support, or

                                 (c)    is designed to act as a unit composed of parts so connected to one another that a load applied to any part of it may alter the stresses induced in other parts.

352(4)  A professional engineer certification for the purposes of subsection (3) must show

                                 (a)    the size and specifications of the temporary supporting structure, including the type and grade of all materials for its construction,

                                 (b)    the loads for which the temporary supporting structure is designed,

                                 (c)    the sequence of loading or unloading the temporary supporting structure, if the loading or unloading sequence is critical to its stability, and

                                 (d)    the shoring sequence, as necessary, after the temporary supporting structure is stripped.

Fly form deck panels

353(1)  An employer must ensure that a fly form deck panel

                                 (a)    is capable of resisting a minimum horizontal load of 3.6 kilonewtons  applied in any direction at the upper edge,

                                 (b)    has a safety factor against overturning of at least 2 to 1, and

                                 (c)    has a safety factor against sliding of at least 1.5 to 1.

353(2)  An employer must ensure that attachments to the panel are completed and secured before the fly form deck panel is detached from the hoist used to position the panel.

353(3)  An employer must ensure that erection drawings and procedures respecting a fly form deck panel are readily available to the workers who will assemble, fly, use, dismantle or reuse the panel.

353(4)  The erection drawings and procedures referred to in subsection (3) must include

                                 (a)    a plan view, longitudinal section and cross section of the panel,

                                 (b)    the calculated position of the panel’s centre of gravity,

                                 (c)    step‑by‑step procedures for all phases of assembly, flying, use, dismantling, repair and reuse of the panel,

                                 (d)    procedures for installing the panel on non‑typical floors, and

                                 (e)    any supplementary specifications for using the panels that are prepared by the manufacturer, a professional engineer or the employer.

353(5)  An employer must ensure that no person is on a fly form deck panel while it is being flown.

353(6)  A person must not be on a fly form deck panel while it is being flown.

Part 24
Toilets and Washing Facilities

Restrictions by employer

354   An employer must not place unreasonable restrictions on a worker’s use of, or access to, any of the facilities required by this Part.

Drinking fluids

355(1)  An employer must ensure that an adequate supply of drinking fluids is available to workers at a work site.

355(2)  The drinking fluids available at a work site must include potable water.

355(3)  Unless water is provided by a drinking fountain, the employer must ensure that an adequate supply of single‑use drinking cups is provided in a sanitary container located by the water supply.

355(4)  If there are outlets at a work site for both potable water and non‑potable fluid, the employer must ensure that the outlet for potable water has a prominent label that clearly indicates drinking water.

Exception

356   Sections 357 to 361 do not apply to

                                 (a)    a food establishment or other work site for which there are specific regulations under the Public Health Act, or

                                 (b)    a mobile or temporary work site at which work is being performed for a period of not more than five working days if the employer has arranged for workers to use local toilet facilities during that period.

Toilet facilities

357(1)  Subject to subsection (2), an employer must ensure that a work site has the number of toilets for each sex that are required by Schedule 7, in separate toilet facilities.

357(2)  A work site may have only one toilet facility for the use of both sexes if

                                 (a)    the total number of workers at the work site is never more than 10, and

                                 (b)    the door to the toilet facility can be locked from the inside.

357(3)  If three or more toilets are required for men, an employer may substitute not more than two thirds of the toilets with urinals.

357(4)  If two toilets are required for men, an employer may substitute one of them with a urinal.

357(5)  An employer must ensure that a toilet facility is located so that it is readily accessible to the workers who may use it.

357(6)  A farming and ranching operation employer is exempt from subsections (1) to (5).

357(7)  Despite subsection (6), a farming and ranching operation employer must provide workers with

                                 (a)    sanitary and hygiene supplies, and

                                 (b)    access to a toilet if one is available at a work site.

AR 87/2009 s357;152/2018

Water and drainage

358(1)  If a work site is connected to a public or municipal water main and sanitary drainage system, the employer must ensure that the toilets are connected to that system.

358(2)  If a work site is not connected to a public or municipal water main and sanitary drainage system, the employer must ensure that the toilets are self‑contained units or connected to a septic tank.

358(3)  An employer must ensure that a toilet that is a self‑contained unit is emptied and serviced at regular intervals to ensure the unit does not overflow.

Hand cleaning facilities

359(1)  An employer must ensure that at least one wash basin or hand cleaning facility is provided in a toilet facility.

359(2)  An employer must ensure that there is one wash basin or hand cleaning facility for every two toilets in addition to the wash basin or hand cleaning facility required under subsection (1) if three or more toilets are required in a toilet facility.

359(3)  An employer may substitute circular wash fountains for wash basins or hand cleaning facilities required by subsections (1) and (2) on the basis that each 500 millimetres of the fountain’s circumference is equivalent to one wash basin or hand cleaning facility.

Supplies and waste receptacle

360   An employer must ensure that a toilet facility at a work site has

                                 (a)    toilet paper available at each toilet,

                                 (b)    hand cleaning agents and single‑use towels of cloth or paper, or air hand drying equipment, at each wash basin or hand cleaning facility, and

                                 (c)    a covered disposal container for feminine hygiene products near each toilet used by women.

Condition of facilities

361(1)  An employer must ensure that a lunch room, change room, toilet, urinal, wash basin, hand cleaning facility, circular wash fountain or shower at a work site is clean and sanitary, and operational.

361(2)  An employer must ensure that changing rooms, lunch rooms, toilet facilities and rooms in which a wash basin or shower are located are not used as storage areas for materials unless the storage facilities are properly constructed for those materials.

Part 25
Tools, Equipment and Machinery

Contact by clothing, etc.

362(1)  If contact between moving parts of machinery, electrically energized equipment or part of the work process and a worker’s clothing, jewellery or hair is likely, an employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    the worker’s clothing fits closely to the body,

                                 (b)    the worker does not wear bracelets, rings, dangling neckwear, a wristwatch or similar articles, and

                                 (c)    the worker’s head and facial hair is short or confined and cannot be snagged or caught.

362(2)  If contact between moving parts of machinery, electrically energized equipment or part of the work process and a worker’s clothing, jewellery or hair is likely, a worker must

                                 (a)    wear clothing that fits closely to the body,

                                 (b)    not wear bracelets, rings, dangling neckwear, a wristwatch or similar articles, and

                                 (c)    have head and facial hair that is short or confined and cannot be snagged or caught.

362(3)  Despite subsections (1) and (2), a worker may wear a medical alert bracelet that has a breakaway or tear away band.

Machines close together

363   An employer must ensure that a worker is not in danger because the machines installed at a work site are close to each other or to a worker.

Moving workers

364   An employer must ensure that machinery or equipment used to move, raise or lower workers is designed by the manufacturer or certified by a professional engineer as being appropriate for that purpose.

Moving workers on a farm or ranch

364.1   Despite section 364, in the case of a farming and ranching operation, if it is not reasonably practicable to use another machine or equipment that is designed for the purpose, workers may be raised or lowered in loader buckets if

                                 (a)    a hazard assessment has been completed,

                                 (b)    fall protection is provided if the worker is being raised over 3 metres,

                                 (c)    the bucket is secured against unintended movement, and

                                 (d)    the machinery or equipment to which the bucket is attached remains stationary on the ground.

AR 152/2018 s20

Starting machinery

365(1)  An employer must ensure that an alarm system is installed if

                                 (a)    a machine operator does not have a clear view of the machine or parts of it from the control panel or operator’s station, and

                                 (b)    moving machine parts may endanger workers.

365(2)  The alarm system must effectively warn workers that the machine is about to start.

Preventing machine activation

366   An employer must install a positive means to prevent the activation of equipment if

                                 (a)    a worker is required, during the course of the work process, to feed material into the machine, or

                                 (b)    a part of the worker’s body is within the danger zone of the machine.

Operator responsibilities

367(1)  Before starting machinery, an operator must ensure that starting the machinery will not endanger the operator or another worker.

367(2)  While operating machinery, an operator must ensure that its operation will not endanger the operator or another worker.

Controls

368   An employer must ensure that an operational control on equipment

                                 (a)    is designed, located or protected to prevent unintentional activation, and

                                 (b)    if appropriate, is suitably identified to indicate the nature or function of the control.

Immobilizing machinery

369   A worker must not leave a machine, or a part of or extension to a machine, unattended or in a suspended position unless the machine is immobilized and secured against accidental movement.

Drive belts

370(1)  A worker must not shift a drive belt on a machine manually while the machine or motor is energized.

370(2)  An employer must ensure that a permanent drive belt shifter

                                 (a)    is provided for all loose pulleys on a machine, and

                                 (b)    is constructed so that the drive belt cannot creep back onto the driving pulley.

Continuous‑feed machinery

371   An employer must ensure that the drive mechanism of a powered, continuously‑fed feeder device permits the feeder mechanism to be stopped independently of the processing mechanism.

Elevated conveyor belts

372(1)  If an elevated conveyor belt passes over a walkway, an employer must ensure that the conveyor

                                 (a)    has side walls high enough to prevent materials from falling from it, and

                                 (b)    runs in a trough strong enough to carry the weight of a broken chain, rope, belt or other material that falls from the conveyor.

372(2)  A worker must use a walkway to cross over a conveyor belt if

                                 (a)    the conveyor belt is moving, or

                                 (b)    the conveyor belt is motionless but has not been locked out in accordance with Part 15.

372(3)  A worker must not cross under a moving conveyor belt except at a walkway.

Crossing conveyor belts

373(1)  A worker must cross over a conveyor belt using a bridge that is at least 1 metre wide and has adequate guardrails.

373(2)  Despite subsection (1), a worker may cross over a conveyor belt at a location other than a bridge if the belt is locked out.

373(3)  A worker must cross under a moving conveyor belt at a designated place where the worker is protected from moving parts of the conveyor and from material falling from the belt.

Actuated fastening tools

374   A worker must not permit the trigger of an actuated fastening tool to be mechanically held in the “ON” position unless the manufacturer’s specifications permit the tool to be used that way.

Grinders

375(1)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a grinder is operated in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, and subject to subsection (2), equipped with a grinder guard,

                                 (b)    the maximum safe operating speed of the grinder accessory in revolutions per minute is equal to or greater than the maximum speed of the grinder shaft in revolutions per minute, and

                                 (c)    if a hand‑held grinder is used, the object being ground cannot move.

375(2)  An employer must ensure that the guard of a hand‑held grinder covers the area of the grinder accessory contained within an arc of at least 120 degrees of the accessory’s circumference.

375(3)  An employer must ensure that if a tool rest is installed on a fixed grinder, the manufacturer’s specifications are followed if they exist, or the tool rest is

                                 (a)    installed in a manner compatible with the work process,

                                 (b)    securely attached to the grinder,

                                 (c)    set at or within 3 millimetres of the face of the wheel, and

                                 (d)    set at or above the centre line of the wheel.

375(4)  A worker must not

                                 (a)    grind material using the side of an abrasive wheel unless the wheel has been designated for that purpose, or

                                 (b)    adjust a tool rest while a grinder accessory is in motion.

Chainsaws

376(1)  An employer must ensure that a chain saw

                                 (a)    is operated, adjusted and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, and

                                 (b)    is designed or equipped with a mechanism that minimizes the risk of injury from kickback when the saw is in use.

376(2)  A worker must not adjust the chain of a chain saw while the saw’s motor is idling.

Circular saw blades

377(1)  An employer must ensure that a circular saw blade with a crack of any size adjacent to the collar line, or with a crack elsewhere that exceeds the limits specified in Schedule 8, Table 1, is

                                 (a)    removed from service, and

                                 (b)    replaced or repaired.

377(2)  If a circular saw blade has a crack near the periphery that does not exceed the limits specified in Schedule 8, Table 1, an employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    the blade is removed from service and replaced,

                                 (b)    the crack in the blade is repaired, or

                                 (c)    the crack is prevented from getting longer by slotting, centre punching, drilling or another effective means.

377(3)  An employer must ensure that a circular saw that is repaired under subsection (1) or (2) is retensioned as necessary by a competent worker.

Band saw blades

378(1)  An employer must ensure that a band saw blade, other than a shake band saw blade, with a crack that exceeds the limits specified in Schedule 8, Table 2,  is

                                 (a)    removed from service and replaced, or

                                 (b)    the crack in the blade is repaired.

378(2)  An employer must ensure that a band saw blade, other than a shake band saw blade, with a crack that does not exceed the limits specified in Schedule 8, Table 2, is

                                 (a)    removed from service until the crack is repaired, or

                                 (b)    the crack is prevented from getting longer by centre punching or another means.

378(3)  An employer must ensure that a band saw that is repaired under subsection (1) or (2) is retensioned as necessary by a competent worker.

378(4)  A worker must not use a shake band saw blade that is cracked.

Band saw wheels

379(1)  Unless a manufacturer specifies or a professional engineer certifies otherwise, an employer must ensure that a cast steel band saw wheel measured 25 millimetres inboard from the rim edge has a minimum rim thickness

                                 (a)    of 14 millimetres for wheels up to and including 1.8 metres in diameter,

                                 (b)    of 16 millimetres for wheels more than 1.8 metres in diameter and up to and including 2.75 metres in diameter, and

                                 (c)    of 17.5 millimetres for wheels more than 2.75 metres in diameter.

379(2)  An employer must ensure that a band saw wheel that is more than 1.2 metres in diameter is tested for cracks at least once every 12 calendar months by a competent worker.

379(3)  An employer must ensure that a band saw wheel that has been exposed to excessive heat is removed from service until the wheel manufacturer or a professional engineer certifies it is safe for continued use.

Power‑fed circular saws

380(1)  An employer must ensure that a power fed circular rip saw with horizontal power‑driven infeed rolls has a sectional non‑kickback device located in front of the saw blade across the full width of the feed rolls.

380(2)  An employer must ensure that a power fed circular resaw has

                                 (a)    a splitter that is as high as the top of the saw, and

                                 (b)    a cover.

Cut‑off saws

381(1)  An employer must ensure that a hand‑operated cut‑off saw, other than a radial arm saw, is equipped with a device that returns the saw automatically to the back of the table when the saw is released at any point in its travel.

381(2)  An employer must ensure that a limit device is used to prevent a swing or sliding cut‑off saw from travelling past the outside edge of the cutting table.

Sawmill head rig

382(1)  An employer must ensure that a circular head saw has adjustable guides and a splitter that

                                 (a)    is located not more than 75 millimetres from the back of the head saw, and

                                 (b)    extends not less than 250 millimetres above the carriage bench.

382(2)  An employer must ensure that the upper half of a top saw on a circular head rig is covered.

382(3)  An employer must ensure that circular head saw guide adjustment controls are operated remotely from the guides.

Sawmill log carriage

383(1)  An employer must ensure that a sawmill log carriage has

                                 (a)    a substantial buffer stop at each end of the carriage travel,

                                 (b)    a carriage with a safety device that keeps the head blocks not less than 30 millimetres from the saw,

                                 (c)    each head block equipped with a dog, and

                                 (d)    sweepers at the front and back of the carriage to clear obstructions from the track.

383(2)  A worker must not use frayed or worn rope, whether fibre or wire, on carriage drives.

383(3)  An employer must ensure that a sawyer’s lever, operating the carriage drive mechanism, is designed and constructed to operate in the opposite direction from the direction the carriage travels if the operator’s position with respect to the carriage could put the operator in danger.

383(4)  An employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    a sawmill with a device for turning logs has a hold‑down device installed on the carriage, and

                                 (b)    a secure restraining device maintains the carriage drive control mechanism and the log‑turning control in neutral if the operator is not at the controls.

Robots

384(1)  An employer must ensure that the design, construction, installation, testing, start‑up, operation and maintenance of an industrial robot system comply with CSA Standard Z434‑03 (R2008), Industrial Robots and Robot Systems – General Safety Requirements.

384(2) to 384(8)  Repealed

Teaching a robot

385   If a worker is teaching a robot, an employer must ensure that

                                 (a)    only the worker teaching the robot is allowed to enter the restricted work envelope,

                                 (b)    the robot system is under the sole control of the worker teaching the robot,

                                 (c)    if the robot is under drive power, it operates at slow speed only or at a speed that is deliberately selected and maintained by the worker teaching the robot,

                                 (d)    the robot cannot respond to a remote interlock or signal that would activate the robot, and

                                 (e)    the worker is outside the restricted work envelope before the robot is returned to automatic operation.

Part 26
Ventilation Systems

Application

386   This Part applies to work sites if a mechanical ventilation system controls worker exposure to

                                 (a)    an airborne contaminant that exceeds or is likely to